Prince Harry to visit Diana’s Angola land mine project

Britain’s Prince Harry takes part in activities with children at the Khayelitsha Football for Hope project in Cape Town, in 2015. (Reuters)
Updated 06 September 2019

Prince Harry to visit Diana’s Angola land mine project

  • The pictures of Diana wearing protective gear as she walked among red skull-and-crossbone signs in 1997 won vital publicity for the Halo Trust
  • Harry, 34, the queen’s grandson and seventh-in-line to the throne, is a frequent visitor to southern Africa for conservation work and holidays

LONDON: Britain’s Prince Harry will make a poignant visit to Angola this month to visit the land mine clearance project that featured in some of the most famous photographs of his late mother Princess Diana.
The pictures of Diana wearing protective gear as she walked among red skull-and-crossbone signs in 1997 won vital publicity for the Halo Trust which was clearing mines left during Angola’s civil war.
Diana died a few months before the international treaty to ban the weapons was signed later that year.
“(Harry) will visit the location where his mother was photographed. He will see how an area that was a dangerous minefield in 1997 is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses,” Buckingham Palace said on Friday.
Harry, his wife Meghan and their baby son Archie will start their 10-day tour in Cape Town, South Africa, while Harry will also go to Malawi and Botswana at the request of the Foreign Office, the palace added.
The trip will be the first official tour as a family for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Meghan, 37, a former US actress, gave birth to Archie, their first child, in May. Archbishop Desmond Tutu will be among the dignitaries the couple will meet during the visit.
Harry, 34, the queen’s grandson and seventh-in-line to the throne, is a frequent visitor to southern Africa for conservation work and holidays.
The trip will take place between Sept. 23 and Oct. 2.


Almost 80,000 homes still without power a week after Japan typhoon

Updated 7 min 15 sec ago

Almost 80,000 homes still without power a week after Japan typhoon

  • Typhoon Faxai powered into the Tokyo region in the early hours of Monday last week
  • The national weather agency Monday issued new warnings for heavy rain in Chiba
TOKYO: Almost 80,000 homes are still without power a week after a powerful typhoon battered eastern Japan, authorities said Monday, with sustained heavy rain prompting evacuation orders and hampering recovery efforts.
Typhoon Faxai powered into the Tokyo region in the early hours of Monday last week, packing record winds that brought down power lines, disrupted Rugby World Cup preparations and prompted the government to order tens of thousands of people to leave their homes.
The storm killed two people, with at least three elderly later confirmed dead due to heatstroke as temperatures soared to above 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) in areas affected by a post-typhoon blackout.
Some 78,700 households were still without power in Chiba, southeast of the capital, Tokyo Electric Co. (TEPCO) spokesman Naoya Kondo said.
“A complete recovery is still unlikely until September 27 as we have difficulties in mountain areas,” he added.
Some 16,700 households were also without water because several water purification plants had no power, a local official said.
With help from the military, officials were dispatching water tanker trucks to the affected areas.
The national weather agency Monday issued new warnings for heavy rain in Chiba, while local authorities issued non-compulsory evacuation orders to 46,300 people due to the risk of landslides.
“A delay in recovery work is expected due to heavy rain,” said Kenta Hirano, a disaster management official in Futtsu in Chiba, where more than 1,000 houses were damaged by the typhoon.
Local media showed residents in Chiba hurriedly covering broken roofs with blue tarps.
“We are at a loss as we can’t live there again,” a 66-year-old man told public broadcaster NHK after the typhoon ripped off the roof of his house.