Camel race and shows cap Europe’s first International Festival for Camels

The International Festival for Camels was held over two days in Janvry, on the outskirts of Paris. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 17 September 2019

Camel race and shows cap Europe’s first International Festival for Camels

  • The activities ranged from a scientific forum to review the latest research on camels to an introduction to the culture of camels

JEDDAH: Sunday marked the end of Europe’s first International Festival for Camels, which was held over two days in Janvry, on the outskirts of Paris.

The festival was held under the patronage of the International Camel Organization, which is chaired by the president of the Camel Club, Fahad bin Falah bin Hethlen, in cooperation with the French government.

It kicked off last Saturday in the presence of Janvry’s mayor, a representative of the French Chamber of Commerce, the president of the French Federation of Camels, the secretary-general of the International Camel Organization Dr. Mubarak Al-Swilim, and the Camel Club’s CEO Khaled Abu Hmeid.

The activities ranged from a scientific forum to review the latest research on camels to an introduction to the culture of camels. 

The organization’s efforts would not have been successful without the support of King Salman and the guidance and support of the crown prince and the general supervisor of the Camel Club.

Fahad bin Falah bin Hethlen, president of the Camel Club

It included an exhibition of camel products, camel shows for the public and a European camel race.

Bin Hethlen said that the sponsorship and presence of the International Camel Organization in Europe’s first International Festival for Camels is part of the organization’s efforts to promote camel culture and activities in the world.

He added: “This is a continuation of what was done during the Central Asian Conference, which we organized last August in Kyrgyzstan. There are more international initiatives that will be announced soon.”

He ended by saying that the organization’s efforts would not have been successful without the support of King Salman and the guidance and support of the crown prince and the general supervisor of the Camel Club.

The organization is sponsored by Saudi Arabia, which is its headquarters.


China restaurant apologizes for weighing customers

Updated 15 August 2020

China restaurant apologizes for weighing customers

  • Customers were asked to stand on scales and scan their data into an app that recommended food choices based on their weight and the dishes’ calorific value
  • The restaurant said it was “deeply sorry” for its interpretation of the anti-waste campaign

BEIJING: A restaurant in China has apologized for its controversial policy of asking diners to weigh themselves before entry in an overzealous response to a new national campaign against food waste.
The beef restaurant in the central city of Changsha was heavily criticized on Chinese social media as soon as it unveiled the policy on Friday.
Customers were asked to stand on scales and scan their data into an app that recommended food choices based on their weight and the dishes’ calorific value, according to a report by the state-run China News Service.
President Xi Jinping this week urged the nation to stop wasting food, as the coronavirus pandemic and serious flooding last month have led to a rise in food prices.
In response, regional catering groups have urged customers to order one dish fewer than the number of diners at a table — an attempt to overturn the ingrained cultural habit of ordering extra food for group meals.
Signs were displayed in the beef restaurant reading “be thrifty and diligent, promote empty plates” and “operation empty plate” — referring to the nationwide campaign — according to photos published in local media.
In a swift backlash, hashtags related to the incident have been viewed over 300 million times on the social platform Weibo.
The restaurant said it was “deeply sorry” for its interpretation of the anti-waste campaign.
“Our original intentions were to advocate stopping waste and ordering food in a healthy way. We never forced customers to weigh themselves,” it said in an apology posted online on Saturday morning.
Chinese state media has also waged war on viral binge-eating videos, known as “mukbang,” while livestreaming platforms have promised to shut down accounts promoting excess eating and food wastage.