Jordan king says Israeli annexation would be a disaster

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Jordan's King Abdullah hold a joint news conference in Berlin, Germany September 17, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 18 September 2019

Jordan king says Israeli annexation would be a disaster

  • Abdullah said “we’re looking on this with tremendous concern.”

Jordan’s King Abdullah said on Tuesday that if Israel went ahead with the idea of annexing all the settlements in the West Bank it would be a “disaster” for attempts to find any two-state solution with the Palestinians.

Speaking after talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Abdullah said he was “extremely concerned” about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s vow to annex all the West Bank settlements.

He said it will “directly impact” the relationship between Israel and Jordan, and Israel and Egypt, and that “these types of statements are ... a disaster to any attempt to move forward to the two-state solution.”

Merkel agreed, calling Netanyahu’s vow “unhelpful.” The German government backs an internationally negotiated peace solution in the sense of a two state solution ... annexations are always detrimental to peace solutions. They do not help and therefore we do not agree, said Merkel

Abdullah said “we’re looking on this with tremendous concern.”

Opinion

This section contains relevant reference points, placed in (Opinion field)

Netanyahu’s career was on the line on Tuesday as Israel held its second national election this year, with voters deciding whether to give him another term in office despite a likely indictment on corruption charges.

The longest serving leader in Israeli history was seeking a fourth consecutive term in office and fifth overall. 

But he faced a stiff challenge from retired military chief Benny Gantz, whose centrist Blue and White party is running even with Netanyahu’s Likud. 

Both parties could struggle to form a majority coalition with smaller allies, though, forcing them into a potential unity government.


Erdogan accuses the West of ‘standing by terrorists’ in Syria

Updated 19 min 33 sec ago

Erdogan accuses the West of ‘standing by terrorists’ in Syria

  • Ankara says the YPG is a “terrorist” offshoot of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)
  • The PKK is blacklisted as a terror group by Ankara, the US and the EU

ISTANBUL: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday lashed out at Western states, accusing them of “standing by terrorists” in failing to support Turkey’s operation against Syrian Kurdish fighters.
“Can you imagine the whole West stood by the terrorists and all attacked us including NATO member states and European Union countries?” Erdogan said in Istanbul.
“Since when did you start to side with terror? Did PYD-YPG (Syrian Kurdish forces) join NATO and we do not know about it?” he asked.
Ankara says the YPG is a “terrorist” offshoot of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which has been waging an insurgency inside Turkey since 1984.
The PKK is blacklisted as a terror group by Ankara, the US and the EU.
Ankara’s military action against Kurdish forces who played a key role in the fight against the Daesh group has drawn widespread international criticism and prompted some NATO countries to suspend new arms sales.
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg has repeatedly voiced “serious concerns” about the military operation launched on October 9 to push Syrian Kurdish forces back from the border.
Erdogan denied any territorial ambition saying: “Turkey does not have an eye on any country’s territory ... We consider such an accusation as the biggest insult directed to us.”
Turkey has announced a 120-hour suspension of the offensive following a deal with US Vice President Mike Pence, under which Kurdish fighters were to withdraw to allow a “safe zone” to be set up along the border.
Erdogan was to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.