Saudi oilfield attacks ‘had zero impact on economy,’ says finance minister

Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan. (SPA)
Updated 19 September 2019

Saudi oilfield attacks ‘had zero impact on economy,’ says finance minister

  • Weekend strikes failed to interrupt market supply or revenue flow, Kingdom’s finance minister says

LONDON: Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan said that the weekend attacks on the Kingdom’s oil infrastructure would have “zero” impact on the country’s economy as concerns about global oil supplies eased.

“In terms of revenues there is zero impact,” Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan told Reuters in an interview on the sidelines of an investor conference in Riyadh.

“Aramco continued to supply the markets without interruption and therefore revenues should continue as they are.”

In a separate interview with Bloomberg, Al-Jadaan said that after a boost to state spending, the government was “seeing momentum” in the non-oil economy and that he expected the sector to hit the 2.9 percent expansion forecast by the International Monetary Fund. Oil prices retreated after the comments, having jumped more than 20 percent at one point on Monday — the biggest spike since the 1990-91 Gulf War.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) said on Wednesday it remained in regular contact with authorities in Saudi Arabia and that for now, markets remain well supplied with ample stocks available. 

IEA member countries hold about 1.55 billion barrels of emergency stocks in government-controlled agencies, which amount to 15 days of total world oil demand. 

In addition, IEA member countries also hold 2.9 billion barrels of industry stocks as of the end of July, a two-year high that can cover more than a month of world
oil demand, the Paris-based agency said.

These stocks include about 650 million barrels of obligated emergency stocks, which can be made immediately available to the market when governments lower their holding requirements.

“Recent events are a reminder that oil security cannot be taken for granted, even at times when markets are well supplied, and that energy security remains an indispensable pillar of the global economy,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director.

“This is why the IEA remains vigilant about the risk of disruptions to global oil supplies.”

The Saudi stock market gained 0.6 percent on Wednesday and Saudi dollar-denominated bonds also recovered after retreating on Monday. Earlier Commerzbank said that the oil price rally that followed the attacks was not sustainable and, despite rising regional tensions, lowered its 2020 price forecasts because of slowing demand growth.

The bank cut its Brent forecast for next year by $5 to $60 per barrel and kept its 2019 outlook unchanged at $65.

It also reduced its 2020 forecast for WTI to $57 from $62. Commerzbank forecast WTI to average $58 this year, Reuters reported.

While the attacks had “painfully demonstrated the risks to oil supply,” raising the possibility of short-term price spikes, prices should fall again in the coming weeks as long as there is no “total escalation of the situation,” analysts said.

 


Lee’s death sparks hope for Samsung shake-up, dividends

Updated 26 October 2020

Lee’s death sparks hope for Samsung shake-up, dividends

  • Shares in the company and affiliates rise; around $9bn in tax estimated for stockholdings alone

SEOUL: Shares in Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. and affiliates rose on Monday after the death a day earlier of Chairman Lee Kun-hee sparked hopes for stake sales, higher dividends and long-awaited restructuring, analysts said.

Investors are betting that the imperatives of maintaining Lee family control and paying inheritance tax — estimated at about 10 trillion won ($8.9 billion) for listed stockholdings alone — will be the catalyst for change, although analysts are divided on what form that change will take.

Shares in Samsung C&T and Samsung Life Insurance closed up 13.5 percent at a two-month high and 3.8 percent, respectively, while shares in Samsung SDS also rose. Samsung Electronics — the jewel in the group’s crown — finished 0.3 percent higher.

Son and heir apparent Jay Y. Lee has a 17.3 percent stake in Samsung C&T, the de facto holding firm, while the late Lee was the top shareholder of Samsung Life with 20.76 percent stake.

“The inheritance tax is outrageous, so family members might have no choice but to sell stakes in some non-core firms” such as Samsung Life, said NH Investment Securities analyst Kim Dong-yang.

“It may be likely for Samsung C&T to consider increasing dividends for the family to cover such a high inheritance tax,” KB Securities analyst Jeong Dong-ik said. Lee, 78, died on Sunday, six years after he was hospitalized due to heart attack in 2014. Since then, Samsung carried out a flurry of stake sales and restructuring to streamline the sprawling conglomerate and cement the junior Lee’s control.

Investors have long anticipated a further shake-up in the event of Lee’s death, hoping for gains from restructuring to strengthen de facto holding company Samsung C&T’s control of Samsung Electronics, such as Samsung C&T buying an affiliate’s stake in the tech giant.

“At this point, it is difficult to expect when Samsung Group will kick off with a restructuring process as Jay Y. Lee is still facing trials, making it difficult for the group’s management to begin organizational changes,” Jeong said.

Lee is in two trials for suspected accounting fraud and stock price manipulation, as well as for his role in a bribery scandal that triggered the impeachment of former South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The second trial resumed hearings on Monday.

Lee did not attend the trial on Monday, as Samsung executives joined other business and political leaders for the second day of funeral services for his father.