Thousands of Houthi violations leave hundreds of civilians dead in Yemen

The Houthi violations included the random detention and abduction of citizens. (File/AFP)
Updated 22 September 2019

Thousands of Houthi violations leave hundreds of civilians dead in Yemen

  • The violations included the killing of 172 children, 106 women and 101 elderly
  • The report also revealed 12,673 families had been displaced

DUBAI: The Houthi militia committed 16,000 violations in the last three years against civilians in Yemen’s Al-Jawf province, according to the Right to Life Organization in Yemen.

The violations, between July 2016 and September 2019, included the killing of 172 children, 106 women and 101 elderly, there were also 786 injured, including 290 children and 113 women, state news agency SPA.

The report also revealed 12,673 families had been displaced, while14 homes, 45 schools, and 11 health facilities had all been bombed.

The Houthi violations also included the random detention and abduction of citizens during the same time.


Lebanese security forces and Hezbollah supporters clash in central Beirut

Updated 14 December 2019

Lebanese security forces and Hezbollah supporters clash in central Beirut

  • Teargas and rubber bullets fired at the protestors
  • Riot police put out calls through loudspeakers for people not to gather

BEIRUT: Clashes broke out on Saturday between Lebanese security forces and Hezbollah supporters in downtown Beirut, some of whom tried to break into a barricaded central district of Lebanon's capital.

Teargas and rubber bullets were fired at the protestors, and the Lebanese Red Cross said several members of the security forces had to be taken to hospital with injuries.

A heavy security presence was put in place central Beirut after the Hezbollah supporters tried to advance to the city’s main central Martyr’s square, and riot police put out calls through loudspeakers for people in he Al-Khandaq Al-Ghamiq area of central Beirut not to gather.

Hundreds of people were gathered as part of a wave of protests that have swept Lebanon since Oct. 17, furious at a ruling elite that steered the country towards its worst economic crisis in decades.

Since the protests pushed Saad Al-Hariri to resign as prime minister in late October, talks between the main parties have been deadlocked over forming a new cabinet.

Lebanon urgently needs a new government to pull it out of the crisis which has also shaken confidence in its banking system. Foreign donors say they will only help after the country gets a cabinet that can enact reforms.

State news agency NNA said the tear gas had made several people faint, while the Lebanese Red Cross said 14 people were injured, six of them badly enough to need taking to hospital.

The unrest erupted from a build-up of anger at the rising cost of living, new tax plans and the record of leaders dominating the country since the 1975-90 civil war. Protesters accuse the political class of milking the state for their own benefit through networks of patronage.