Putin offers counterterrorism help to Philippine president

Putin offers counterterrorism  help to Philippine president
Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte during their meeting in the Black Sea resort of Sochi. (AP)
Updated 05 October 2019

Putin offers counterterrorism help to Philippine president

Putin offers counterterrorism  help to Philippine president
  • Leaders vow to expand strategic ties as bilateral trade doubles to more than $1.2bn

Russian President Vladimir Putin has pledged his country’s full support for the Philippines’ fight against terrorism.

Speaking during Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte’s current five-day official visit to Russia, Putin said: “On the bilateral level, I would like to point out that the Philippines is an important partner for Russia in Asia. Our bilateral cooperation is constructive and mutually beneficial.”
The Russian leader added that the two countries had developed a “truly friendly” relationship and recalled how Duterte had to cut short his first visit to Russia in May 2017 because of terrorist attacks by Daesh-inspired militants in Marawi City.
“I know that over the past two years you have managed to bring down the terrorist threat to a very low level and to greatly strengthen the capability of your security agencies.
“Mr. President, we are ready to continue to develop our partnership and to share our experience and achievements in the field of counterterrorism,” Putin said.
Citing the expansion of links between Russia and the Philippines, the president said it was largely due to Duterte’s personal contribution that political dialogue between the two countries had been revitalized, resulting in considerable achievements in trade and economic cooperation.
“Our trade has doubled, or more precisely, it increased by 102 percent to over $1.2 billion (SR4.5 billion) in 2018. Russian exports to your country have increased fourfold,” Putin added.
However, he believed the two countries could do much more, noting that Russia had major reserves in place and companies were ready to increase exports of energy, aircraft, motor transport and special equipment to the Philippines.
According to Putin, Russia also wanted to increase industrial cooperation with the Philippines, as well as improve collaboration on space exploration and the use of digital technologies.
He stressed the importance of establishing direct ties between entrepreneurs, citing the regular meetings of the Business Council, created in 2009.
In reply, Duterte said: “I am here today to reaffirm our strong commitment to build a robust and comprehensive partnership with the Russian Federation.”
He pointed to a dramatic increase in bilateral activities over the past two years and noted that both governments had made “historic firsts” in key strategic areas such as economic, defense, security, and military technical cooperation.

BACKGROUND

Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte defended his controversial war on drugs as he tried to convince world leaders he was ‘not a killer.’

On defense and security, Duterte highlighted the port call by the BRP Tarlac to Vladivostok in 2018, an unprecedented goodwill visit by a Philippine Navy vessel.
The two nations had also established high-level consultative mechanisms involving their foreign ministries, national security councils, and economic agencies.
The Filipino president cited the opening of defense attachés in both countries as an indication of their long-term commitment to enhance defense relations.
Meanwhile, at the Valdai discussion forum, Duterte defended his controversial war on drugs as he tried to convince world leaders he was “not a killer.”
He said he was having to fight corruption and the trafficking of drugs inside and outside of his government, and therefore a swift response was required, adding that he took full responsibility for all of the consequences of his drug war.
“I and I alone. If some day somebody has to be hanged, I will be happy. I will even put the noose on my neck and say, ‘go ahead.’”
Amid charges of extrajudicial killings in connection with his purge on narcotics, Duterte emphasized that it was not his government’s policy to execute all people involved in the illicit trade.
“I have no business. I have no universal right to destroy a fellow human being. I do not allow the military to shoot a person hog-tied or with his stretched hand in surrender. I told them that the only way that you can kill a criminal, the drug lords and the addicts, is when your life is in danger.”
However, during the forum, Duterte also said he “would be happy” if all the drug lords and addicts were killed.
He added: “I assure you I have a religion … I have my own God. I am not a killer. Some say (I’m) a killer. Of what? I have yet to kill one human being. When I say I will kill you, well, that’s a statement coming from the mouth of a president.”
In the past Duterte had reportedly claimed that he personally killed suspected criminals when he was mayor of his home city of Davao.


Germany slams ‘anti-Semitic’ demos and Hamas ‘terrorist attacks’

Germany slams ‘anti-Semitic’ demos and Hamas ‘terrorist attacks’
Updated 45 min 32 sec ago

Germany slams ‘anti-Semitic’ demos and Hamas ‘terrorist attacks’

Germany slams ‘anti-Semitic’ demos and Hamas ‘terrorist attacks’
  • Merkel’s government stressed “Israel’s right to self-defense against these attacks”
  • Germany has seen scattered demonstrations this week over the escalating conflict

BERLIN: Germany on Friday said rockets fired by Hamas at Israel amount to “terrorist attacks” and warned it would not tolerate “anti-Semitic” demonstrations on its own soil as the conflict intensified in the Middle East.
“These are terrorist attacks that have only one goal: to kill people indiscriminately and arbitrarily and to spread fear,” Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert told a government press conference.
Merkel’s government stressed “Israel’s right to self-defense against these attacks,” he added.
Palestinian militants have fired some 1,800 rockets, and the Israeli military has launched more than 600 airstrikes, toppling at least three high-rise apartment buildings, and has shelled some areas with tanks stationed near the frontier.
The Gaza Health Ministry says the toll from the fighting has risen to 119 killed, including 31 children and 19 women, with 830 wounded. The Hamas and Islamic Jihad militant groups have confirmed 20 deaths in their ranks, though Israel says that number is much higher. Seven people have been killed in Israel, including a 6-year-old boy and a soldier.
The most intense hostilities in seven years were triggered by weekend unrest at Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque compound, which is sacred to both Muslims and Jews.
Germany has seen scattered demonstrations this week over the escalating conflict, with protesters shouting anti-Semitic slogans and burning Israeli flags.
Flags were burned outside synagogues in Muenster and Bonn, with 16 people arrested.
On Wednesday evening, around 180 people shouted anti-Jewish slogans at a march in Gelsenkirchen, also in the west.
On Thursday around 1,500 people gathered in the northern city of Bremen calling for “freedom for Palestine” in a protest which proceeded without incident, according to local police.
Seibert said Friday that Germany would not tolerate “anti-Semitic” demonstrations.
“Anyone who attacks a synagogue or defiles Jewish symbols shows that for them it is not about criticizing a state or the policies of a government, but about aggression and hate toward a religion and the people who belong to it,” he said.
German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier had on Thursday also condemned the protests.
“Those who burn Star of David flags in our streets and shout anti-Semitic slogans not only abuse the freedom to demonstrate, but are committing crimes,” he told the popular Bild daily.
“Nothing justifies threats against Jews in Germany or attacks on synagogues in German towns,” he said.


12 killed in mosque blast near Afghan capital, shattering cease-fire calm: police

12 killed in mosque blast near Afghan capital, shattering cease-fire calm: police
Updated 14 May 2021

12 killed in mosque blast near Afghan capital, shattering cease-fire calm: police

12 killed in mosque blast near Afghan capital, shattering cease-fire calm: police
  • Kabul police spokesman says explosives had been placed inside the mosques
  • No one immediately claimed responsibility for the explosion

KABUL: A blast at a mosque on the outskirts of the Afghan capital during Friday prayers killed at least 12 worshippers, police said, shattering the relative calm of a three-day cease-fire.
“The death toll has jumped to 12 killed including the imam of the mosque and 15 others are wounded,” Ferdaws Framurz, the spokesman for Kabul police said, updating an earlier toll.
He said the explosion happened inside a mosque in Shakar Darah district of Kabul province.
The blast is the first major incident since a temporary truce between the Taliban and government troops came into force on Thursday.
The warring sides agreed on the truce to mark the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Fitr, only the fourth such halt in fighting in the nearly two-decades old conflict.
Deadly violence has rocked the country in recent weeks after the US military began formally withdrawing its remaining 2,500 troops from Afghanistan on May 1.
Last week, a series of blasts outside a girls’ school in the capital killed more than 50 people, most of them teenage girl students.


US pulls out of major Kandahar base in southern Afghanistan

US pulls out of major Kandahar base in southern Afghanistan
Updated 14 May 2021

US pulls out of major Kandahar base in southern Afghanistan

US pulls out of major Kandahar base in southern Afghanistan

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan: The United States has completed its withdrawal from Kandahar Airfield in southern Afghanistan, once the second largest military base in the country for US forces, officials said Friday.
“They have not officially handed over the base to us but I can confirm they left the base on Wednesday,” said Khoja Yaya Alawi, a spokesman for the Afghan army in Kandahar.


Diplomats, donors concerned about sex abuse reports at WHO

Diplomats, donors concerned about sex abuse reports at WHO
Updated 14 May 2021

Diplomats, donors concerned about sex abuse reports at WHO

Diplomats, donors concerned about sex abuse reports at WHO
  • Senior WHO management was informed of multiple sex abuse allegations involving at least 2 of its doctors in the Ebola epidemic in 2018
  • The US State Department had no immediate comment

LONDON: British, European and American diplomats and donors have voiced serious concerns about how the World Health Organization handled sex abuse allegations involving its own staff during an outbreak of Ebola in Congo, as reported this week by The Associated Press.
On Tuesday, the AP published an investigation documenting that senior WHO management was informed of multiple sex abuse allegations involving at least two of its doctors during the epidemic in 2018.
A notarized contract obtained by the AP showed that two WHO staffers signed off on an agreement between WHO’s Dr. Jean-Paul Ngandu and a young woman he allegedly impregnated in Congo. In it, Ngandu promised to pay the young woman money, cover her pregnancy costs and buy her a plot of land. The contract was made “to protect the integrity and reputation of the organization,” Ngandu said.
“The UK has a zero tolerance approach when it comes to sexual exploitation and harassment — and that extends to all international organizations that we fund,” said Simon Manley, the UK’s ambassador to the UN in Geneva. “We are speaking with WHO and other major donors as a matter of urgency to establish the facts.” Britain is WHO’s second biggest donor, after the US
The US State Department had no immediate comment.
WHO has declined to comment on the specific allegations reported by the AP and said it is waiting for the results of a panel created last October to investigate sexual abuse during the Congo outbreak involving WHO staffers.
“What’s alarming is that WHO seems to be keeping this abuse quiet and not publicly condemning these allegations,” said Clare Wenham, an assistant professor of global health policy at the London School of Economics, who has studied gender and funding issues at WHO. “There’s a lot of talk about giving WHO more money but I don’t think any government should be committing to that until we know it’s an organization we can trust.”
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the agency’s third-largest funder, said it expects UN agencies to conduct thorough investigations into sexual abuse as quickly as possible.
“Our role as a funder is to hold organizations that receive grants from the foundation to the highest standards of transparency and accountability, and to insist that they take steps to prevent misconduct in the future,” the foundation said.
Lawrence Gostin, director of the WHO Collaborating Center on Global Health Law at Georgetown University, said the ultimate responsibility for WHO’s Ebola response lies with director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. The AP found that one of the doctors accused of sexual harassment, Boubacar Diallo, bragged about his relationship to Tedros, who mentioned Diallo during a speech in January 2019. The AP spoke with three women who said Diallo offered them WHO jobs in exchange for sex; Diallo denied the claims.
“I find it hard to believe Tedros would have known about these allegations and done nothing,” Gostin said. “The (director-general) must meet the highest ethical standards so we must understand what he knew and when he knew it. ... Dr. Diallo may have used his relationship with Tedros as leverage in sexual exploitation, but it would not be Tedros’ fault if he wasn’t aware of it.”
Gostin said WHO staffers who were aware of sexual misconduct claims but failed to act should be punished.
Balazs Ujvari, a spokesman for the European Commission, said it would “thoroughly monitor the investigations” by the AP. He said the commission is ready to review or suspend funding “for any partner who is not living up to the required high ethical and professional rules and standards.” Last year, the European Commission gave WHO about 114 million euros ($138 million).
The World Bank said it is “deeply concerned” about the new sex abuse allegations at WHO. The bank paused its negotiations with Congolese authorities for new financing to agencies, including WHO, last year when reports of general sex abuse during the Ebola outbreak surfaced.
“We review our relationship with any organization whose standards are in question,” the World Bank said in an email.


Muslims around world add subtle local twists to Eid celebrations

Muslims around world add subtle local twists to Eid celebrations
Updated 14 May 2021

Muslims around world add subtle local twists to Eid celebrations

Muslims around world add subtle local twists to Eid celebrations
  • Ramadan ended on Wednesday evening marking the start of Eid Al-Fitr celebrations by Muslims around the world
  • The holiday signals the end of the important month-long period of Islamic fasting and religious reflection

CHICAGO: Arab News reporter Kateryna Kadabashy has noted that while more than 1.8 billion Muslims around the world commemorate Ramadan and celebrate Eid in similar ways, subtle differences still exist based on local and regional traditions and cultures.

Ramadan ended on Wednesday evening marking the start of Eid Al-Fitr celebrations by Muslims around the world.

The holiday signals the end of the important month-long period of Islamic fasting and religious reflection, with many worshippers adopting different ways to enjoy the festival based on their national origins.

A Ukrainian-Palestinian journalist who reports on varied topics including Crimea, Palestine, and women’s rights, Kadabashy detailed in her story how Ukrainian Muslims in the Crimea region celebrate Eid with slightly nuanced differences reflecting local culture.

She said: “One of the stories I wrote, was about how Ukrainian Muslims celebrate Eid. And I tried to focus on Islam in general because in Ukraine it is not a very widespread religion.

“There are not a lot of Muslims, and a lot of people that are Muslims – unless they are Tartar Ukrainians or from the Crimea region – are most likely to be people that have converted to Islam or people that have become Ukrainian.

“I was wondering how they celebrated Eid, because for me all of the Eid celebrations done at home were very Levant oriented.”

Kadabashy explained how Ukrainians celebrated Eid in a slightly different way to the rest of the Islamic world.

“The way Ukrainian Muslims celebrate Eid is kind of very similar, more similar to how Ukrainians celebrate anything rather than how we celebrate Eid at home.

“I asked a (Ukrainian) woman how she celebrated Eid at home, and she liked the usual things that we do. Baking a cake, going for a picnic. Ukrainians like to celebrate anything and everything, such as having a barbecue in the park. So, they do the same things for Eid that any other Ukrainian would do for any other celebrations,” she added.

Kadabashy noted that Muslims everywhere practiced certain basic traditions of Ramadan, such as donating money and food to charitable organizations and those in need.

But she also pointed out that the types of food eaten during iftar and Eid varied, with many preferring Levant foods over traditional regional dishes.

“They also try to give a dua, or an amount of money for their children or other children on Eid,” she said.

“They still try to gather with family, loved ones, and friends. These things are kind of similar. But then all cultures gather around the holidays and all religions are not exclusive to Eid.”

In addition, she noted that Muslims around the globe sacrificed lambs or other animals during Eid and gave the meat to needy families.

  • The Ray Hanania Radio Show is broadcast every Wednesday live on WNZK AM 690 in Greater Detroit and WDMV AM 700 in Greater Washington, DC at 8 AM EST, and streamed live on Facebook.com/ArabNews.