Mariah Carey, Hussain Al-Jassmi to perform at free Expo 2020 concert in Dubai

The stars will perform at a free concert. (AFP)
Updated 07 October 2019

Mariah Carey, Hussain Al-Jassmi to perform at free Expo 2020 concert in Dubai

DUBAI: US superstar singer Mariah Carey, along with the Emirati star Hussain Al-Jassmi, will perform in Dubai this month at a celebration to mark one year until Expo 2020. 

The free-to-attend concert will be held at Burj Park, Downtown Dubai, on Oct. 20, kick-starting the “One Year to Go” countdown to Expo 2020 Dubai.




Hussain Al-Jassmi will perform at Burj Park, Downtown Dubai. (AFP)

In addition to the concert, free festivities are set to take place in every emirate from 5pm to 10pm, topped off by a projection on the Burj Khalifa, with a countdown moment at 8.20pm that will mark the precise time the next World Expo is set to launch on Oct. 20, 2020.

Simultaneous festivities will take place across the other six emirates at Louvre Abu Dhabi, Al Majaz Waterfront in Sharjah, Ajman Museum, Umm Al Quwain Corniche, Al Qawasim Corniche in Ras Al Khaimah and Fujairah Fort.

To enquire about tickets, fans can visit expo2020dubai.com/1YTG

 

Najeeb Mohammed Al-Ali, executive director, of the Expo 2020 Dubai Bureau, said: “As we celebrate a momentous milestone on the journey to Expo 2020, there is an ever-growing sense of excitement and togetherness throughout the UAE. This will be reflected in the seven One Year to Go events around the emirates, showcasing the inclusive and collaborative spirit of the UAE.

“Across the nation, people of all ages and backgrounds will enjoy an evening of unparalleled entertainment and excitement. We’re delighted to welcome two stellar musical acts to the Dubai stage with Mariah Carey and Hussain Al-Jassmi. The seven celebrations will not only wow everyone, they will also serve as a glimpse into why Expo 2020 will be the World’s Greatest Show.”

 


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!