British actress Millie Bobby Brown shows love for Jordanian designer

The actress wore a fairy tale-like pair of transparent pump. (AFP)
Updated 09 October 2019

British actress Millie Bobby Brown shows love for Jordanian designer

DUBAI: Netflix's “Stanger Things” star Millie Bobby Brown stepped out in glass slingbacks by the Jordanian-Romanian designer Amina Muaddi at an Ulta Beauty fan meet and greet event this week - the latest in a long line of celebrities to hop on the designer's bandwagon.

The Emmy-nominated British actress wore a fairy tale-like pair of transparent pumps, decorated with a crystal-embellished brooch.  

The label, known for its bright hues and stilettos that often broaden out into a square block at the base of the heel, shared a snap of the fashionable teenager. “The cutest @milliebobbybrown in her Begum glass slingbacks,” read the Instagram caption.




Amina Muaddi shared a snap of the fashionable teenager on Instagram. (Instagram) 

Brown teamed the shoes with an off-the-shoulder denim top and two-toned jeans.  

A fan shared a picture with Brown, where the star was also spotted wearing a pair of “Gilda” crystal- embellished sandals by Muaddi at another event. 

Muaddi is fast becoming a celebrity favorite and the former Destiny’s Child singer Kelly Rowland is the latest in a glittering line of leading ladies who have been spotted in her distinctive designs.

Rowland was spotted at the opening of director Tyler Perry's new studio in Atlanta over the weekend wearing a slinky pair of sling backs by the designer. A day later, she hit the red carpet in an dark-green ensemble with sparkling heels by Muaddi, which she wore with a jade green mini dress by Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran. Rowland even took to social media last week to gush over her latest pair of Amina Muaddi heels, posting an Instagram Story in which she waxes lyrical about her "fly" new shoes. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kylie @aminamuaddiofficial

A post shared by AMINA MUADDI (@aminamuaddi) on

Muaddi has been in the spotlight as of late, with the likes of Kylie and Kendall Jenner, Rihanna and British model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley showing off her heels in recent months.

Kylie boasted a pair of the “Lupita” glass slippers at the launch of her new skincare line, Kylie Skin, at the end of May, while her older sister Kendall finished off a skin-tight minidress with the Gilda rainbow sandals while in Cannes in May.

Back in April, beauty mogul Rihanna was spotted in New York — reportedly out and about with her Saudi beau Hassan Jameel — wearing a black coat with strappy white sandals by Muaddi, while Huntington-Whiteley has been an avid fan for quite some time and regularly takes to Instagram to show off Muaddi’s latest designs.

Muaddi’s footwear label is designed in Paris and produced in Italy.


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!