‘Biggest fight on the planet’ — Tickets go on sale for ‘Clash on the Dunes’ in Saudi Arabia

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Tickets for the biggest boxing bout on the planet – the Clash on the Dunes – between Andy Ruiz Jr. and Anthony Joshua (pictured) in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, go on sale on Sunday night. (Supplied)
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Tickets for the biggest boxing bout on the planet – the Clash on the Dunes – between Andy Ruiz Jr. (pictured) and Anthony Joshua in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, go on sale on Sunday night. (Supplied)
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Tickets for the biggest boxing bout on the planet – the Clash on the Dunes – between Andy Ruiz Jr. and Anthony Joshua in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, go on sale on Sunday night. (Supplied)
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Tickets for the biggest boxing bout on the planet – the Clash on the Dunes – between Andy Ruiz Jr. and Anthony Joshua (pictured) in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, go on sale on Sunday night. (Supplied)
Updated 14 October 2019

‘Biggest fight on the planet’ — Tickets go on sale for ‘Clash on the Dunes’ in Saudi Arabia

  • First heavyweight world title fight in the Middle East
  • New tourism visas launched by Kingdom mean it has never been easier for boxing fans to flock to the fight

RIYADH: Tickets for the biggest boxing bout on the planet – the Clash on the Dunes – between Andy Ruiz Jr. and Anthony Joshua in Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, go on sale on Sunday night.

The two are set to clash on Dec. 7 in the Diriyah Arena, a purpose-built arena for 15,000 fans, as Anthony ‘AJ’ Joshua attempts to recapture the belts taken from him by Andy ‘Destroyer’ Ruiz Jr earlier in the year.

Boxing fans from across the region and around the globe from Sunday onwards can get their tickets to the fight, which includes new super-fast tourist visas recently launched the Kingdom.

It will be the first world heavyweight title fight ever to be staged in the Middle East and forms part of the month-long Diriyah Season, a spectacular season of world-class sport, global entertainment, and culture, launched last week at a glittering ceremony in the ancient city, the birthplace of modern Saudi Arabia on the outskirts of Riyadh.

Due to the unique venue, being staged outside of the UK or the US, the fight has already seen parallels drawn in the media to some of the most iconic fights in history, such as Muhammad Ali's fights against George Foreman - "the Rumble in the Jungle" - and Joe Frazier - the "Thrilla in Manila.”

The launch followed the recent announcement that travelers from 49 countries across the world can now secure tourist visas online in just seven minutes to attend the festival and its events.

HRH Prince Khaled bin Abdulaziz, Chairman of Skill Challenge Entertainment (SCEE), said: “This is a historic moment for Saudi Arabia welcoming the first world heavyweight championship, as a nation we have started to pave the way for becoming a global player in the sports and entertainment industry and we have witnessed a real appetite for the boxing sport.

“This is the biggest fight that has taken place in the region to date and we are bringing it to Saudi Arabia on December 7 – the world is watching us and we promise to deliver an unparalleled experience. SCEE are a proud partner of the GSA bringing Clash on the Dunes to Diriyah Season, 2019.”

Boxing promoter Eddie Hearn, who is also Anthony Joshua’s manager, said: “This is the biggest boxing match on the planet, and it will be taking place in one of the most unique venues ever.

“We already know there is a great passion for boxing in the Kingdom, but AJ and Andy will want their fans to come and support them, from across the region and from the UK and the US and Mexico.

“It’s great news that these tourism visas have been launched, that’s a big step forward for the country and it means that boxing fans wherever they are can come witness an unmissable night. This fight will go down in history as one of the greats.”

Tickets go on sale at 9pm KSA time (10pm UAE, 7pm UK and 2pm US) and are available at www.diriyahseason.sa.

Prices below:

Category 1: SAR3,995
Category 2: SAR2,995
Category 3: SAR1,995
Category 4: SAR995
Category 5: SAR495


Signs suggest summer dates for 2021 Olympics

Yoshiro Mori President Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee
Updated 30 March 2020

Signs suggest summer dates for 2021 Olympics

  • The postponed Games were to have opened on July 24 and closed on Aug. 9

TOKYO: Tokyo Olympic organizers seem to be leaning away from starting the rescheduled Games in the spring of 2021. More and more the signs point toward the summer of 2021.

Organizing committee President Yoshiro Mori suggested there would be no major change from 2020.
“The Games are meant to be in summer, so we should be thinking of a time between June and September,” Japanese news agency Kyodo reported Mori saying on Saturday.
International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, after the postponement was announced in Switzerland on Tuesday, left open the possibility of spring dates.

FASTFACT

Any final decision will be made between local organizers and the IOC, and hundreds of sponsors, sports federations and broadcasters.

The postponed games were to have opened on July 24 and closed on Aug. 9. Mori suggested some decisions could be made as early as this week when the organizing committee’s executive board meets.
Any final decision will be made between local organizers and the IOC, and hundreds of sponsors, sports federations and broadcasters.
Athletes have been left in limbo by the postponement. Many have been forced to stop training because of the spreading coronavirus. Even those who can train have no idea about how to schedule training to reach peak fitness at the right time.

The Games are meant to be in summer, so we should be thinking of a time between June and September.

Yoshiro Mori, President Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee

Mori and organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto have both said the added cost of rescheduling will be “enormous.” Early estimates put those costs at between $2-3 billion with the several levels of Japanese governments likely to foot most of the bills.
Tokyo organizers say they are spending $12.6 billion to stage the Games. However, a government audit report said it will cost at least twice that much. All but $5.6 billion is public money.
The Switzerland-based IOC has contributed $1.3 billion to organize the Tokyo Olympics, according local organizing committee documents. It has a reserve fund of about $2 billion for such emergencies and also has insurance coverage.