Erdogan accuses the West of ‘standing by terrorists’ in Syria

Ankara’s military action against Kurdish forces who played a key role in the fight against the Daesh group has drawn widespread international criticism. (File/AFP)
Updated 21 October 2019

Erdogan accuses the West of ‘standing by terrorists’ in Syria

  • Ankara says the YPG is a “terrorist” offshoot of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)
  • The PKK is blacklisted as a terror group by Ankara, the US and the EU

ISTANBUL: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday lashed out at Western states, accusing them of “standing by terrorists” in failing to support Turkey’s operation against Syrian Kurdish fighters.
“Can you imagine the whole West stood by the terrorists and all attacked us including NATO member states and European Union countries?” Erdogan said in Istanbul.
“Since when did you start to side with terror? Did PYD-YPG (Syrian Kurdish forces) join NATO and we do not know about it?” he asked.
Ankara says the YPG is a “terrorist” offshoot of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which has been waging an insurgency inside Turkey since 1984.
The PKK is blacklisted as a terror group by Ankara, the US and the EU.
Ankara’s military action against Kurdish forces who played a key role in the fight against the Daesh group has drawn widespread international criticism and prompted some NATO countries to suspend new arms sales.
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg has repeatedly voiced “serious concerns” about the military operation launched on October 9 to push Syrian Kurdish forces back from the border.
Erdogan denied any territorial ambition saying: “Turkey does not have an eye on any country’s territory ... We consider such an accusation as the biggest insult directed to us.”
Turkey has announced a 120-hour suspension of the offensive following a deal with US Vice President Mike Pence, under which Kurdish fighters were to withdraw to allow a “safe zone” to be set up along the border.
Erdogan was to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.


US declares Israeli settlements on occupied Palestinian land 'consistent' with international law

Updated 18 November 2019

US declares Israeli settlements on occupied Palestinian land 'consistent' with international law

  • The announcement by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo sparked anger among Palestinians
  • The move is the latest by the Trump administration seen as favoring the Israeli position over the Palestinians

WASHINGTON: The United States on Monday backed Israel’s right to build Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank by abandoning its four-decade position that they were “inconsistent with international law.”

The announcement by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo sparked anger among Palestinians who say the settlements are the main barrier to their future state.

The shift in US policy follows the Trump administration’s decision to relocate the US embassy in Israel to Jerusalem last year, a move seen as undermining Palestinian claims to the eastern half of the city as a future capital.

Pompeo said US statements about the settlements on the West Bank - which Israel captured during a 1967 war - had been inconsistent, saying Democrat President Jimmy Carter in 1978 found they were not consistent with international law and Republican President Ronald Reagan in 1981 said he did not view them as inherently illegal.

“The establishment of Israeli civilian settlements is not, per se, inconsistent with international law,” Pompeo told reporters at the State Department, drawing criticism from a senior Palestinian figure even before his announcement.

“Another blow to international law, justice & peace,” Hanan Ashrawi, a veteran Palestinian negotiator and member of the Palestine Liberation Organization's Executive Committee, said on Twitter ahead of Pompeo’s statement.

The announcement marked the third major instance in which the Trump administration has sided with Israel and against stances taken by the Palestinians and Arab states even before unveiling its long-delayed Israeli-Palestinian peace plan.

In 2017 Trump recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel before opening the embassy in the city. US policy had previously been that the status of Jerusalem was to be decided by the parties to the conflict.

In March, Trump recognized Israel’s 1981 annexation of the Golan Heights in a boost for Netanyahu that prompted a sharp response from Syria, which once held the strategic land.

Trump's move might have been designed to help Netanyahu as he struggles to stay in power. Israeli politics is deadlocked after two inconclusive elections this year. Former military chief Benny Gantz's centrist Blue and White party emerged neck and neck with Netanyahu following a September vote, and both leaders have struggled to put together a ruling coalition.

*With Reuters