Russia yet to finalize stance before OPEC+ considers deeper oil cuts

Russia agreed to reduce output by 228,000 barrels per day (bpd) to about 11.18 million bpd in 2019 as part of cuts agreed by the group known as OPEC+. (AFP)
Updated 03 December 2019

Russia yet to finalize stance before OPEC+ considers deeper oil cuts

  • Russia agreed to reduce output by 228,000 barrels per day to about 11.18 million bpd in 2019
  • But it pumped more than its quota in November, producing 11.244 million bpd

MOSCOW: Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said on Tuesday he expected this week’s meeting of OPEC oil producers and their allies to be constructive but said Moscow had yet to finalize its position in talks on possible additional supply curbs.
Russia agreed to reduce output by 228,000 barrels per day (bpd) to about 11.18 million bpd in 2019 as part of cuts agreed by the group known as OPEC+. But it pumped more than its quota in November, producing 11.244 million bpd.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Russia and other producers, which previously agreed to reduce combined output by 1.2 million bpd or 1.2 percent of global demand until March, hold discussions in Vienna on Thursday and Friday.
“I will not tell you anything now as we are still finalizing our position,” Novak told reporters. “Let’s wait ... But I think the meeting, as usual, will be of constructive nature.”
Two sources said on Monday that OPEC+ was discussing cutting output by at least an additional 400,000 bpd, as Riyadh seeks high oil prices to balance its budget and help Thursday’s pricing for Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering (IPO). The Saudis have been lobbying others to deepen cuts.
Novak said Russia’s average cut was 195,000 bpd in November and said Moscow aimed to comply fully with the quota in December.
Russia earlier called for a change to the way its output is measured to exclude gas condensate, which accounts for about 7 percent-8 percent of Russia’s total oil production, or about 800,000 bpd.
Novak told reporters he planned to discuss excluding condensate from Moscow’s quotas at the OPEC+ meeting.
By excluding condensate and only taking into account oil production, Novak said Russia’s output could be about 225,000 bpd to 230,000 bpd less in December.
“That said, we will discuss with our colleagues to take into account our statistics the same way as for OPEC countries — excluding condensate,” the minister said.
Vagit Alekperov, chief executive of Russia’s No.2 oil producer Lukoil, said in comments broadcast on Tuesday that it would not be expedient to deepen global oil production cuts in the winter season, especially for Russia.
Russian data cites production in tons. Reuters uses a conversion rate of 7.33 barrels per ton of oil.


Oil giants’ production cuts come to 1m bpd as they post massive write-downs

Updated 10 August 2020

Oil giants’ production cuts come to 1m bpd as they post massive write-downs

  • Crude output worldwide dropped sharply after the market crashed in April

LONDON: The world’s five largest oil companies collectively cut the value of their assets by nearly $50 billion in the second quarter, and slashed production rates as the coronavirus pandemic caused a drastic fall in fuel prices and demand.

The dramatic reductions in asset valuations and decline in output show the depth of the pain in the second quarter. Fuel demand at one point was down by more than 30 percent worldwide.

Several executives said they took massive write-downs because they expect demand to remain impaired for several more quarters as people travel less and use less fuel due to the ongoing global pandemic.

Of those five companies, only Exxon Mobil did not book sizeable impairments. But an ongoing reevaluation of its plans could lead to a “significant portion” of its assets being impaired, it reported, and signal the elimination of 20 percent or 4.4 billion barrels of its oil and gas reserves.

By contrast, BP took a $17 billion hit. It said it plans to recenter its spending in coming years around renewables and less on oil and natural gas.

Weak demand means oil producers must revisit business plans, said Lee Maginniss, managing director at consultants Alarez & Marsal. He said the goal should be to pump only what generates cash in excess of overhead costs.

“It’s low-cost production mode through the end of 2021 for sure, and to 2022 to the extent there are new development plans being contemplated,” Maginniss said.

London-based BP has previously said it plans to cut its overall output by roughly 1 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOEPD) by the end of 2030 from its current 3.6 million BOEPD.

Of the five, Exxon is the largest producer, with daily output of 3.64 million BOEPD, but its production dropped 408,000 BOEPD between the first and second quarters. The five majors, which include Chevron Corp, Royal Dutch Shell and Total SA, also cut capital expenditures by a combined $25 billion between the quarters.

Crude output worldwide dropped sharply after the market crashed in April. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed to cut output by nearly 10 million barrels a day to balance out supply and demand in the market.