Trump says world ‘has to be watching’ the violence in Iran

Donald Trump disembarking from Air Force One after landing in the UK for the NATO summit. (AFP)
Updated 03 December 2019

Trump says world ‘has to be watching’ the violence in Iran

  • 'Iran is killing thousands and thousands of people right now as we speak'
  • Trump says US supports 'brave people of Iran' protesting for freedom

LONDON: President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he supports the demonstrations in Iran and urged the world to watch the Iranian government’s violent effort to quash protests that he says have killed “thousands of people.”
Speaking in London, where he is attending the NATO leaders summit, Trump said, “Iran is killing thousands and thousands of people right now as we speak.”
He added they were killed “for the mere fact that they’re protesting,” and he called it a “terrible thing.”
Trump was mum on what, if anything, the US could do in response to the violence, but he said, “I think the world has to be watching.”
Later, during a meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Trump said he misunderstood an earlier question when he said he did not support the Iranian protesters. Trump explained that he thought the question, during an earlier meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron, pertained to financial support for the protesters. “We do support them totally,” Trump explained.

The president also sent out a tweet that said: “The United States of America supports the brave people of Iran who are protesting for their FREEDOM. We have under the Trump Administration and always will!“
Amnesty International said on Monday it believes at least 208 people were killed in the protests and the crackdown that followed. Iranian state television on Tuesday acknowledged for the first time that security forces shot and killed what it described as “rioters” in multiple cities amid recent protests over the spike in government-set gasoline prices.
The protests are viewed as a reflection of widespread economic discontent gripping the country since Trump reimposed nuclear sanctions on Iran last year.
Trump encouraged reporters “to get in there and see what’s going on,” noting that the Iranian government has curtailed Internet access to limit the spread of information about the violence.


Arab world mourns death of Kuwait’s emir

Updated 27 min 1 sec ago

Arab world mourns death of Kuwait’s emir

  • Kuwait says goodbye to “Emir of Humanity”
  • Sheikh Sabah has been succeeded as emir by his brother

The Gulf states and the wider Middle East mourned the death on Tuesday of the emir of Kuwait, Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah.
Sheikh Sabah, who was 91, had ruled Kuwait since 2006, and steered its foreign policy for more than 50 years. He died in the US, where he had been in hospital since July following surgery in Kuwait.

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman sent their condolences to the people of Kuwait and the Al-Sabah family. (AP)

Flags flew at half staff in Kuwait, which began 40 days of mourning. “Goodbye, Emir of Humanity,” read a large banner on a street near the Kuwait stock exchange.
Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman sent their condolences to the people of Kuwait and the Al-Sabah family.
“With the departure of Sheikh Sabah, we lose a wise leader who devoted his life to the service of his country and the Islamic and Arab nations,” said the Saudi Foreign Minister, Prince Faisal bin Farhan. “We console ourselves and our brothers in Kuwait for this great loss.”

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GCC Secretary-General Dr. Nayef Falah Al-Hajraf said the world had “lost the pioneer of development, always striving for good, love and peace, aiming to strengthen harmony, cooperation and solidarity among the peoples of the world, and who spared no effort for the good of all humanity.”
Dr. Yousef bin Ahmed Al-Othaimeen, secretary-general of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, said Sheikh Sabah was a voice of wisdom and moderation. “He was one of the leaders of Kuwait who worked on its prosperity and supported its stability,” he said.

Crown Prince Nawaf Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah succeeds Sheikh Sabah. (AP)

Sheikh Sabah has been succeeded as emir by his brother, Crown Prince Nawaf Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, 83, who will be sworn in on Wednesday.
Dahim Alqahtani, a Kuwaiti politics expert, said the emirate’s policies were unlikely to change under the new emir. “I believe Kuwait will follow Sheikh Sabah’s policies, which are based on balance and bridging differences,” he told Arab News.