Saudi Arabia ends gender segregation in restaurants 

Women sit among men in a cafe in Khobar, Saudi Arabia opened this year. (Reuters/File photo)
Updated 09 December 2019

Saudi Arabia ends gender segregation in restaurants 

  • Restaurants in the Kingdom have until now had to provide two entrances: one for women and families and another for men
  • Rules to make life easier for investors, citizens, says Makkah mayor

RIYADH/MAKKAH: The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs has ended the requirement for restaurants to have separate sections for males and families.

Dr. Majid Al-Qasabi, the department’s minister-designate, also approved other updates to rules and regulations in different sectors on Sunday.

Dr. Khaled Al-Jammaz, undersecretary-designate for technical affairs at the ministry, explained that the move was part of a number of amendments that included 103 regulations, requirements, manuals, models, standards and applications for activities of all kinds.

Makkah Mayor Mohammed Abdullah Al-Quwaihis told Arab News that the amendments aimed to make life easier for investors, citizens and entrepreneurs.

“They will be positive and will ease many conditions and restrictions, but they will not affect the core of the work in terms of public health and food, and this decision will increase the flow of investment and the number and variety of restaurants,” he said.

Nasser Al-Shalhoub, one of the owners of the soon-to-be opened Chaoua coffee shop, said that ending the requirement to have separate sections for males and families was an excellent decision — “especially since we are facing a problem with increasing costs because we are obligated to make two counters for the two sections, and now with this amendment the ministry has helped us to start working and reduce costs.”

A good designer can provide clever solutions to offer privacy for customers in different ways; it doesn’t have to be by blocking the place with big walls.

Abdulrahman Al-Harbi, An architect

“This will benefit us because we will take advantage of the space, and the area will look better,” he said.

Abdulrahman Al-Harbi, an architect, said: “A good designer can provide clever solutions to offer privacy for customers in different ways; it doesn’t have to be by blocking the place with big walls,” Al-Harbi said.

Ruba Al-Harbi, who manages a restaurant and owns the Snapchat lifestyle account @Tasteeandtell, also agrees with the amendment. “It’s a waste of money to open two sections for males and families because this segregation will do nothing when both sides meet outside the restaurant’s doors.” She said that she had noticed the change a while ago, even before it was announced on the ministry’s website.

“I have entered several restaurants that had only one section and it was fine to sit and eat there.”

Al-Harbi said that were many issues when restaurants were divided. “Family sections are usually crowded. You often can’t find a place to sit while male sections are always empty because they don’t go to restaurants as much as females,” she said. 

Dareen Rajeh, a compliance analyst, said that many people in Saudi Arabia needed to get used to the existence of both sexes in the same place without becoming confused or uncomfortable. “We need to open our horizons and focus on more important issues.”


KSRelief launches prosthetics' center in Taiz

Updated 23 January 2020

KSRelief launches prosthetics' center in Taiz

TAIZ: The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) on Wednesday launched an artificial limb center in Taiz, Yemen, providing high-quality prosthetics for up to 600 patients.

Abdulqawi Al-Mikhlafi, who is the deputy governor of Taiz, expressed his appreciation for the Kingdom’s generous support to Yemen across all sectors over the past few years, particularly in the areas of health, the environment and development.

Al-Mikhlafi said such efforts helped local authorities to deal with the many challenges they faced in providing comprehensive services to needy Yemenis.

He added that the Kingdom’s support reflected the deep historical and cultural ties between the people of Yemen and Saudi Arabia, and he praised the Kingdom for standing by the country and its government for more than 50 years.

Dr. Elan Abdul Haq, deputy governor of Taiz for health affairs, thanked KSRelief for its continued support for Taiz and Yemen, assistance he said had alleviated the suffering of millions of Yemenis during the ongoing conflict.

The head of the Artificial Limbs Center, Mansour Al-Wazei, announced that the center would begin receiving patients soon, providing vital aid to amputees for whom prosthetics meant regaining the ability to live full and productive lives.