Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season

Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
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The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them. (Photo/Supplied)
Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
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The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them. (Photo/Supplied)
Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
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The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them. (Photo/Supplied)
Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
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The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them. (Photo/Supplied)
Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
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The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them. (Photo/Supplied)
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Updated 14 December 2019

Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season

Diriyah Oasis makes family fun accessible during Diriyah Season
  • The area features new attractions, old favorites and plenty of entertainment for people of all ages

AD DIRIYAH: Saudi Arabia’s Diriyah Season has featured many exciting one-time events such as concerts, the Formula E Prix, and the historic Clash on the Dunes fight, but there’s always plenty more fun to be had in Diriyah. One of the most popular attractions available in the area is the Diriyah Oasis.

Diriyah Oasis is a funfair-type attraction in the heart of Diriyah. Split into four zones — Nature, Imagination, Reflection and Excitement. The 130,000 square meter area features new attractions, old favorites and plenty of entertainment for the whole family.

The Nature Zone includes outdoorsy activities such as a “forest walk,” an elevated obstacle course to challenge you, a butterfly dome, where people can take a walk inside a butterfly-filled bubble and learn more about their life cycles, and even a special area where they can experience the feeling of skydiving.

The Reflection Zone includes the Diriyah Wheel, a towering Ferris wheel offering views of the surrounding Diriyah area, waterfall swings that magically dissipate as you swing through them, and a series of sand art sculptures.

The Imagination Zone contains attractions such as a series of escape rooms, urban ping pong tables that can take four, six, or even eight players, illusion rooms and an urban maze.

The Excitement Zone features drone racing, laser tag, bumper cars and a video game arena where visitors can indulge in some rounds of popular multiplayer games.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The Nature Zone includes outdoorsy activities such as a ‘forest walk,’ a butterfly dome where people can take a walk inside a butterfly-filled bubble and learn more about their life cycles.

• The Imagination Zone contains attractions such as a series of escape rooms, illusion rooms and an urban maze.

• The Excitement Zone features drone racing, laser tag, bumper cars and a video game arena where visitors can indulge in some rounds of popular multiplayer games.

Workshops are available throughout each area where kids and adults can create artwork to take home (such as birdfeeders or plant pots in the Nature Zone, futuristic abstract art in the Excitement Zone, and so on), and also themed carnival games with several prizes on offer, ensuring no one goes home empty-handed.

And of course, a variety of restaurants and cafes have set up shop in the area, from the quick and casual eateries such as the Mexican-inspired Fire Grill or the donut bakery Glaze, up to more fancy eateries such as the French Le Relais de l’Entrecote steak restaurant or the Armenian Mayrig. There’s even a Starbucks, set up high on one of the Oasis’s two main gates, where you can enjoy a coffee while overlooking the entire area.

Payments in the Oasis are made by way of rechargeable electronic bracelets, which you can preload with money at various points in the park. However, the bracelets are only used for the attractions, which range in price between SR20-60 ($5.5-16). Food and drinks are purchased normally.

The Diriyah Oasis was designed to pay tribute to Diriyah’s historical importance and reflect the rich heritage, architecture and resources of Saudi Arabia and the region.

The Oasis is open from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m. Sunday to Wednesday, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Thursday, and 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Entry tickets can be purchased for SR100 from the Diriyah Season website, or from the Jarir Bookstore.


Virus rules violators warned as cases decline in Saudi Arabia

Virus rules violators warned as cases decline in Saudi Arabia
Hundreds of individuals were fined for breaking social gathering protocols in different part of Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Updated 27 min 3 sec ago

Virus rules violators warned as cases decline in Saudi Arabia

Virus rules violators warned as cases decline in Saudi Arabia
  • Saudi Arabia has administered more than 11.7 million COVID-19 vaccines so far at a rate of 33.5 doses per hundred

JEDDAH: More than 250 individuals were fined for breaking social gathering protocols in the last 24 hours, including 72 women attending a wedding where authorities imposed fines on both guests and the host.
For the fourth day in a row, the number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in Saudi Arabia remained below 1,000 with a significant rise in recoveries.
A total of 886 new cases of the cases were recorded in the Kingdom on Monday, meaning 433,980 people in Saudi Arabia have now contracted the disease.
In addition, 1,127 new recovered cases were also announced, taking the total number of recoveries to 418,914, meaning the Kingdom’s recovery rate has increased to 96.5 percent, marking a significant decline in the epidemiological curve.
There were 7,892 active cases, 1,377 of them critical, an increase of just one patient in the past 24 hours.

FASTFACTS

• A total of 886 new cases were recorded in the Kingdom on Monday.

• The highest number of cases was recorded in the Riyadh region.

• More than 250 individuals fined for violating health protocols.

The regions with the highest number of infections were Riyadh with 281 cases and Makkah with 250. Twelve new COVID-19 related deaths were reported, raising the death toll to 7,174.
Saudi Arabia has administered more than 11.7 million COVID-19 vaccines so far at a rate of 33.5 doses per hundred. Of the Kingdom’s 34.8 million people, 33.6 percent have now been vaccinated with at least one jab.
On Monday, the Ministry of Islamic Affairs closed nine mosques temporarily in six regions, after cases of COVID-19 were detected among worshipers.
The ministry stated that the total number of mosques that had been closed now amounted to 1,210, with 1,188 subsequently reopened after the completion of disinfection.


GCC national ID not valid for travel

GCC national ID not valid for travel
Travelers must verify the conditions of the destination country and ensure they are met. (SPA)
Updated 38 min 20 sec ago

GCC national ID not valid for travel

GCC national ID not valid for travel
  • King Fahd Causeway Passports raises operational capacity

RIYADH: Using a national ID as a document for traveling to Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries remains suspended, a spokesman for the Eastern Province Passports said.

Citizens wishing to travel must verify the conditions of the destination country and ensure they are met, Mualla Al-Otaibi added.
In February last year, the Saudi Ministry of Foreign Affairs decided to suspend GCC citizens’ use of national identity cards for travel to and from the Kingdom, coinciding with the onset of precautionary measures to combat COVID-19.
Al-Otaibi said the border points of the Eastern Region Passports had resumed work after the lifting of travel suspensions through all air, land and sea ports on May 17.
“Preventive maintenance work was carried out for all border backup devices and systems,” said Al-Otaibi.
A further 10 lanes have been installed in the departure area, bringing the total number of lanes to 27, with 36 lanes in the arrival area.
King Fahd Causeway Passports increased its operational capacity by 30 percent to facilitate passenger travel.
The spokesman said that meetings and workshops were held with port authorities to ensure speedy and smooth travel, while applying all precautions.
The movement of passengers leaving for Bahrain had decreased sharply since Monday morning, he said. The director general of Saudi Customs at the King Fahd Causeway, Dhaifallah Al-Otaibi, told Arab News they were ready to receive arrivals and departures through the causeway, and to provide customs services to travelers of all categories.
Customs at the causeway linking Saudi Arabia and Bahrain strived to enhance customs procedures, he added.

We are ready to receive arrivals and departures through the causeway.

Dhaifallah Al-Otaibi, DG Saudi Customs

He confirmed the continued cooperation and coordination between all parties operating at the border crossing, and that port authorities were all working as one business system to provide the best services.
“Customs (the land link between Saudi Arabia and Bahrain) continues to take precautionary measures, (which are) more intense with the start of travel between the two countries to ensure the maximum levels of safety recommended to protect travelers and arrivals, in addition to protecting the employees of the port,” he added.
Customs at the King Fahd Causeway continued working on freight traffic since the suspension of personal travel between the two countries last year, he said.
Causeway customs statistics said that procedures for about 272,000 trucks entering and leaving the Kingdom had been completed between March 2020 until the end of April 2021, while about 325,000 vehicles had crossed the causeway in both directions since the beginning of this year.


Saudi envoy attends virtual meeting on Palestine

Saudi envoy attends virtual meeting on Palestine
Ambassador Abdullah bin Yahya Al-Muallami, the permanent representative of Saudi Arabia to the UN, attends a meeting of the Arab Group in New York. (SPA)
Updated 7 min 4 sec ago

Saudi envoy attends virtual meeting on Palestine

Saudi envoy attends virtual meeting on Palestine
  • The meeting discussed ways to stop Israeli violations and reviewed strategies to take up the issue in the UN

NEW YORK: Ambassador Abdullah bin Yahya Al-Muallami, the permanent representative of Saudi Arabia to the UN, took part in an online meeting of the Arab Group in New York on Monday to discuss the situation in Palestine.
The meeting discussed ways to stop Israeli violations and reviewed strategies to take up the issue in the UN. The participants of the meeting stressed the need for a coordinated plan of action to urge the UN to make Israel stop committing atrocities against Palestinian civilians.
The meeting also called on the international community to carry out its duties to protect innocent civilians.


Over 26k Saudis get jobs through Hadaf in April

Over 26k Saudis get jobs through Hadaf in April
Thousands of young Saudi men and women got jobs in 8,682 companies. (Photo/Twitter)
Updated 21 min 28 sec ago

Over 26k Saudis get jobs through Hadaf in April

Over 26k Saudis get jobs through Hadaf in April
  • The Riyadh region topped with 10,354 beneficiaries

RIYADH: A total of 26,311 young Saudi men and women got jobs in 8,682 companies in the private sector during April through the placement services offered by the Human Resources Development Fund (Hadaf).
The number of male beneficiaries of the program was 12,141 while 14,170 women found jobs in the private sector. The Riyadh region topped with 10,354 beneficiaries.
The number of the program’s beneficiaries is rising due to a new strategy used by Hadaf to ensure jobs for the qualified Saudi youth by forging partnership with the private sector. 


Who’s Who: Mishari Almishari, deputy director of the National Information Center

Who’s Who: Mishari Almishari, deputy director of the National Information Center
Mishari Almishari. (Supplied)
Updated 16 min 17 sec ago

Who’s Who: Mishari Almishari, deputy director of the National Information Center

Who’s Who: Mishari Almishari, deputy director of the National Information Center

Mishari Almishari, who was recently awarded the Order of King Abdul Aziz Second Class for his services to the country, has been deputy director of the National Information Center (NIC) since Sept. 2019.
The NIC provides IT solutions and services to Saudi government bodies and has one of the largest IT centers in the Middle East.
It was set up three decades ago as the Computer Center, which became the General Administration of Central Information, changing to the NIC in the 1980s.
Almishari received a bachelor’s degree from King Saud University (KSU) in 2001 and completed his postgraduate studies in the US, receiving a master’s in computer science from the University of Southern California in 2006.
He did a doctorate in computer science at the University of California, Irvine, with his thesis focusing on (online) security and privacy.
During his stay in the US, Almishari worked as a research intern at Xerox Corp. in New York in 2010.
On his return to the Kingdom, he joined KSU in 2013 as an assistant professor. He taught undergraduate courses and conducted research in the areas of security and privacy until 2019.
He was a deanship consultant for over two years and supervised several IT-related projects at KSU between 2013 and 2015.
Almishari was chief information officer at Saudi Customs from 2016 to 2017.
His research papers have been published in scientific journals, while his dissertation on machine learning and security and privacy for the modern web was published in five scientific journals.