DJs call the tune at Riyadh fashion pop-up

Moh Flow, a Syrian artist based in Dubai, delivered a hit set-list to an enthralled audience.
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Updated 23 December 2019

DJs call the tune at Riyadh fashion pop-up

  • The pop-up event focused on Saudi fashion with exclusive live art, photography, community talks and music

RIYADH: Leading DJs followed up their set lists with words of inspiration at a pop-up event in Riyadh hosted by Saudi fashion label AA (A for Anonymous).

Saudi “X-Factor Arabia” winner Hamza Hawsawi, Vinyl Mode, Moh Flow, DJ Majid and DJ Baloo were among performers and artists helping AA celebrate Vision 2030 as well as the Kingdom’s youth culture in fields including music, philanthropy, sports and entrepreneurship.

The pop-up event, held at streetwear outlet Urbn Lot last week, focused on Saudi fashion with exclusive live art, photography, community talks and music.

DJ Majid set the stage with an uplifting set before being joined by his friend DJ Mohammed Nassar, aka Vinyl Mode. Both performed at MDL Beast, the region’s biggest music festival, held in Riyadh at the weekend.  

“These are exciting times. I got to play at MDL Beast with my brothers. This is a great moment in history,” Majid told Arab News.

Inspiration

Moh Flow, a Syrian artist based in Dubai, delivered a hit set list to an enthralled audience.

“I am a huge Moh Flow fan and I am so excited to see him in Riyadh,” Mazen, a visitor said.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Saudi philanthropist Wid Enani, founder of Live to Give, a Jeddah charity organization, encouraged young citizens to volunteer and ‘connect to their community to make it a better place.’

• Saudi artists Nawaf and Abdullah created live art. ‘It is an honor to be here and do this,’ they said.

• Yara, a young female rapper from Jeddah, traveled to Riyadh for her first performance in the capital.

The “X-Factor” winner, who made an appearance on the MDL Beast main stage on Saturday, “inspires us to believe that dreams can come true,” Abdullah, a blogger at the event, told Arab News.

“For all those who love to sing and have a passion, he has been brave enough to take the risk and pave the way.”

Speaking at the event, Saudi philanthropist Wid Enani, founder of Live to Give, a Jeddah charity organization, encouraged young Saudis to volunteer and “connect to their community to make it a better place.”

Yara, a young female rapper from Jeddah, traveled to Riyadh for her first performance in the capital.

“It is amazing to see female rappers get a platform in Riyadh,” she said. “I’ve never seen this before.”

Saudi artists Nawaf and Abdullah also created live art. “It is an honor to be here and do this,” they said.


‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

Updated 15 August 2020

‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

DHAHRAN: Right on the heels of “Indian Matchmaking,” Netflix acquired streaming rights to Australian dating show “Love on the Spectrum” for a global audience. While these releases offer minority groups visibility and representation in mainstream media (the Indian diaspora and adults on the autism spectrum, respectively) the latter takes a nuanced and thoughtful approach to matchmaking.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV as endorsed by “Too Hot to Handle” and “Love is Blind,” both of which were released earlier this year.

First released on the Australian Broadcast Corp. last fall, the unscripted show follows seven singles on the autism spectrum as they look for love and companionship, and two autistic couples as they make momentous relationship decisions.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV. Supplied

Unobtrusive and done respectfully, the show offers insight into their lives and vulnerabilities — what autism on the spectrum looks like for each individual, the challenges they face in social situations, and why they seek companionship. Alongside heart-warming interviews with participants and their families, the episodes feature first dates, mixer events and sessions with autism or relationship experts.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities that shine through. One cannot help but laugh out loud at 25-year-old Michael’s one-liners that double as sage advice.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities. Supplied

But while these “quirks” seem loveable and endearing to a neuro-typical audience, autistic audiences have voiced that in their quest to make a show interesting, these snippets romanticize high-functioning autism and disregard Level 3 autism (the most severe). They have also voiced a desire to see an autistic and non-autistic pairing.

At the outset, a show that follows autistic young adults in the dating world may not seem like something one can relate to. But as the five-part docuseries unravels, one can agree that the universal experience of navigating the dating world and finding love is difficult — autistic or not. With awkward first dates and heartbreak, “Love on the Spectrum” is heartfelt, authentic and real, and therein lies the appeal of the show.