KAUST researcher wins top award for global marine science work

Prof. Carlos Duarte with his father in law Vicente Agusti (age 97) who visits Duarte every year at KAUST. ‘I take inspiration from his perseverance in learning. My goal is that, through my research, the ocean will have, by 2050, an abundance of life as Vicente knew in his childhood.’ (AN Photo)
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Updated 10 February 2020

KAUST researcher wins top award for global marine science work

  • Carlos Duarte, a professor of marine science, Tarek Ahmed Juffali Research Chair in Red Sea Ecology, won the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in ecology and conservation biology
  • The award was made in recognition of his leadership role in research related to the problems of global marine science and his contribution to the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan

JEDDAH: A researcher at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) has received a top international award for his contribution to global marine science and the Kingdom’s ambitious Red Sea tourism project.
Carlos Duarte, a professor of marine science, Tarek Ahmed Juffali Research Chair in Red Sea Ecology, won the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in ecology and conservation biology granted by the Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria Foundation (Fundacion BBVA) in Spain.
Prof. Duarte, who is of Portuguese origin, has taken part in several global research campaigns as part of his efforts to expand knowledge about marine biodiversity and its role in shaping environments around the world.
The award was made in recognition of his leadership role in research related to the problems of global marine science and his contribution to the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan.
Expressing his delight at receiving the “prestigious” accolade, the professor highlighted the major role played by KAUST in promoting his work and supporting efforts to preserve marine ecosystems.
“It (the award) could be rightly called the ‘Nobel award’ of ecology and biodiversity, with a distinguished international jury selecting among the top ecologists in the world,” Duarte told Arab News
“For the award to be presented to me represents, therefore, a huge honor and a great recognition, not only of my work, but to that of the dozens of students and hundreds of collaborators that have contributed to my research over the years, as well as my institution, KAUST, for its unparalleled support and intellectual freedom to pursue the best research I am able to deliver.”
He pointed out that the launch of Vision 2030 had been an historic event setting the Kingdom on a path to a bright future.
“I was contacted in 2016 to provide advice on how the giga projects that are being developed in the Red Sea could become drivers of positive marine conservation outcomes.
“I was immediately challenged and captivated by the notion that development, which for decades has been a driver of destruction and biodiversity loss in the marine environment, could be reverted, with the right vision, motivation, commitment and scientific support, into a driver of a rebound of marine life in the ocean,” the professor said.
He noted that the commitment of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to marine conservation was “a model for leaders worldwide.”
Duarte added that he was “proud” to have been involved in the Red Sea project and said that tourism development and a national transformation program, such as Vision 2030, could be drivers of a game-changing shift in the recovery of marine environments.
He said his work had “led to new thoughts on the role of the private sector in rebuilding marine life, which I am about to publish. It also makes me proud of contributing through my research to develop this aspiration in Saudi Arabia.”
Duarte also collaborates and supports sustainability, marine conservation, and design work on the Amaala and NEOM mega projects.
He is currently leading an initiative to enhance sea turtle conservation in the Red Sea that is jointly funded by the Red Sea Development Co., Amaala, NEOM and KAUST. “These sea turtles move all across the Red Sea and represent a shared asset that is everyone’s responsibility to protect,” he added.
He noted that global recognition of Vision 2030 would be taken to a new level in the run-up to the Kingdom hosting this year’s G20 summit of world leaders.
“The principles that drive and inspire Vision 2030 will not only propel the development of the Kingdom but will also help other nations adopt concepts developed within KSA, such as the use of development to drive ocean conservation, developed by the Red Sea project, or the circular carbon economy, a concept put forward in October 2019 by Energy Minister Prince Abdul Aziz bin Salman as a new approach to solve the climate crisis while avoiding disruptive economic impacts to societies that could hurt the disadvantaged and create social unrest,” Duarte said.


‘American Sharqawia’: US Consul General Rachna Korhonen bids Saudi Arabia farewell

Updated 56 min 18 sec ago

‘American Sharqawia’: US Consul General Rachna Korhonen bids Saudi Arabia farewell

  • "There’s some magic in the water of the desert," says Korhonen

JEDDAH: As she reaches the end of her second mission in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, US Consul General Rachna Korhonen will soon be heading home, taking memories to last a lifetime.
Known for her love for culture and the Arabic language and for her vast knowledge of the region, Korhonen became well known as a constant supporter of Saudi women and youth in the region, participating in numerous cultural and social events in the Eastern Province and across the Kingdom.
After two more weeks in the Kingdom, Korhonen will return to the US capital to serve as the executive director of the Bureau of Near East Affairs (NEA) and the Bureau of South Central Asian Affairs (SCA) at the US State Department which supports the posts in the region, including Saudi Arabia, thus continuing her connection with the Kingdom.
With 14 years of experience as a US diplomat, she served 3 years in Riyadh in 2010, and then came back to serve as the consul general in Dhahran in August 2017. “I would say Riyadh was the start of my relationship with Saudi Arabia, and Dhahran and the Eastern Province is the culmination of the relationship,” said Korhonen told Arab News on a video call. She almost feels herself Sharqawia, a resident of the Eastern Province, Sharqia.
“Ana Sharqawia (‘I am a Sharqawia). The measure of any place is the people, it’s not about the place, it’s really about the people.”
As consul general, her role was to build relations and promote the interests of her home in the country where she was posted. Korhonen went the extra mile, she joined in the region’s celebrations and understood its traditions and culture.
Recalling her time in the Eastern Province, she said: “I’ve been getting to know Sharqawis, the people who live and work here, who have made this their home in the years since Aramco started or were born in Al-Ahsa. I think anyone who comes to the Eastern Province falls in love,” she said.
“The biggest reason I’ve gotten to enjoy myself here is (because) it has quite a bit of America here. I think it’s difficult to realize how much America exists in Saudi Arabia until you come to the Eastern Province,” she added.
As the drilling for oil began in 1935 with the help of the California Arabian Standard Oil Company (CASOC), which later became Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s oil capital has been home to thousands of Americans over the past 85 years, who have had a major influence on the region.
“Aramco is definitely a reminder of home, and you put that in with the people, the hospitality, the normal way of being Saudi which is to welcome your guests no matter who they are. You put those things together, you get the best of the United States and you get the best of Saudi Arabia.”
A native of New Jersey and big baseball fan, her love for the game didn’t stop her from supporting the Al-Ettifaq Football Club in Dammam, attending matches and singing their anthem.
Her trips to Al-Ahsa, a place she calls the most beautiful place in the Kingdom, allowed her to discover the region’s vast experiences.
Her appreciation of Al-Ahsa goes deep. Both the scenery and the hospitality of the people make it her favorite city — she even took Ambassador John Abizaid on a trip there in February.
“As you drive towards Al-Ahsa, you can see the sand changing color, from a bright yellow to a reddish color,” she said. “You start seeing the desert turning green, which is amazing to me. I’m a mountain and forest type of person and I can tell you that I now like the desert too, it’s beautiful.”
The uniqueness of Al-Ahsa called out to Korhonen and she recalls her first visit to the region in 2017. “The history, the people, the food, the culture, is very different from any place I’ve been to in Saudi Arabia, Hasawis (people of Al-Ahsa) are lovely. I think there’s some magic in the water of the desert,” she said.
Korhonen developed an interest in regional cultural events, visiting local markets picking out sheep for Eid, learning about the Saudi love for falconry and participating in the traditional celebratory dance of Al-Arda. She even has a Diwaniya, a parlor where guests are received, at her home.
When she returned to the Kingdom in 2017, Korhonen noticed the transformation of the Kingdom, noting that Vision 2030 has been the instigator for this noticeable change.
“The changes have been tremendous, I think Vision2030 is really going to really bring Saudi Arabia onto the world stage. I think some parts are already there. In the energy sector, Saudi Arabia has always been a leader,” she said. “I’m betting you right now that you’re going to see Saudi women, you’re going to see Saudi men, you’re going to see Saudi kids, Saudi art, culture and music, the traditional Saudi things, all starting to show up on the world stage.”
As the Kingdom heads towards diversifying its economy, Korhonen anticipates that the world will begin seeing more Saudi entrepreneurs with innovative ventures, as education is key. She noted that with the continuous flow of Saudi students on scholarships in the US, their return to the Kingdom will help bring forth a new business-like mindset with partnerships between the two countries that will help the Kingdom’s economy to flourish.
“It’s coming,” she noted. “I’ve seen some of the (US) businesses here, but I haven’t seen enough yet and I’d like to see more of that in the next 2-5 years, because Vision 2030 will be a success if we can get entrepreneurs to start businesses and hire more Saudis,” she added. “That to me is the key and that is what you should be bringing back from the US.”
As the end of her mission draws near, it's safe to say that we'll be seeing Korhonen back in the Kingdom in the near future.
“I’ll honestly come back because of the people, because of the friendships I’ve made here.”