Jennifer Gates, Nayel Nassar celebrate their engagement with party pictures

The couple celebrated their much-reported on engagement with a party in Florida. (Instagram)
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Updated 11 February 2020

Jennifer Gates, Nayel Nassar celebrate their engagement with party pictures

  • The two have been together since January 2017, bonding over their passion for equestrian sports

DUBAI: Jennifer Gates and her Egyptian fiancé Nayel Nassar just celebrated their much-reported on engagement with a party in Florida.

Gates, the daughter of billionaire Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, shared a picture on her Instagram alongside her Egyptian show jumper fiancé, in which the pair are both wearing simple white outfits.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Always putting a smile on my face

A post shared by Nayel Nassar (@nayelnassar) on

Nassar, 29, also took to Instagram to share snaps of the heartwarming moment and wrote: “Always putting a smile on my face.”

The two have been together since January 2017, bonding over their passion for equestrian sports, with Gates also being an equestrian athlete who competes frequently. Both belong to the Paris Panthers, a riding club which competes in different forms of equestrian sporting events.

Similar to Gates, Nassar was born to millionaire parents in Chicago in the US but was raised in Kuwait.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by Jennifer Gates (@jenniferkgates) on

His parents run an architecture and design firm which relocated to the US in 2009.

He began riding at the age of five and was jumping by the age of 10. He first qualified in 2013 for the FEI World Cup Finals, an annual international competition which includes the most skilled and talented show jumping horses and riders.

Like Gates, Nassar graduated from Stanford University with a degree in economics, while she has a degree in human biology.


Film review: Great storytelling makes for fascinating watch in Netflix’s ‘Yeh Ballet’

"Yeh Ballet" is no rags-to-riches story, but one of sheer fortitude and a bit of luck. (Supplied)
Updated 31 min 33 sec ago

Film review: Great storytelling makes for fascinating watch in Netflix’s ‘Yeh Ballet’

CHENNAI: Sooni Taraporevala gained immense fame by writing for Mira Nair’s films, such as "The Namesake," "Mississippi Masala" and the Oscar-nominated "Salaam Bombay." In 2009, Taraporevala stepped behind the camera to helm a small movie called "Little Zizou" about the Parsi community. It was a hit, and three years ago, she took up the camera again to create a virtual reality short documentary about two boys from Mumbai’s slums who became renowned ballet dancers. 

Taraporevala converted her documentary into a full-length feature, "Yeh Ballet," for Netflix, and the work, though with a somewhat documentary feel, is fascinating storytelling — a talent we have seen in her writings for Nair. 

Happily, "Yeh Ballet" is no rags-to-riches story (of the kind "Gully Boy" was), but one of sheer fortitude and a bit of luck. The film begins with a breathtaking aerial shot of the Arabian Ocean on whose shores Mumbai stands — an element that points toward the director’s background as a photographer. 

The film chronicles the lives of Nishu and Asif Beg. (Supplied) 

A story inspired by true events, "Yeh Ballet" chronicles the lives of Nishu (Manish Chauhan) and Asif Beg (newcomer Achintya Bose). The two lads are spotted by a ballet master, Saul Aaron (British actor Julian Sands) who, driven away from America because of his religion, lands in a Mumbai dance school.

Nishu and Asif, despite their nimble-footed ballet steps, find their paths paved with the hardest of obstacles. When foreign scholarships from famous ballet academies come calling, they cannot get a visa because they have no bank accounts. And while Asif’s father, dictated by his religion, is dead against the boy’s music and dancing, Nishu’s dad, a taxi driver, feels that his son’s passion is a waste of time and energy.

Well, all this ends well — as we could have guessed — but solid writing and imaginative editing along with Ankur Tewari’s curated music and the original score by Salvage Audio Collective turn "Yeh Ballet" into a gripping tale. It is not an easy task to transform a documentary into fiction, but Taraporevala does it with great ease. Or so it appears. Of course, the two protagonists add more than a silver lining to a movie that will be long remembered — the way we still mull over "Salaam Bombay" or "The Namesake." But what I missed was a bit more ballet; the two guys are just wonderful to watch as they fly through the air.