Giorgio Armani postpones Cruise 2021 show in Dubai amid coronavirus concerns

The coronavirus continues to create havoc with the industry’s calendars of events. (File/AFP)
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Updated 08 March 2020

Giorgio Armani postpones Cruise 2021 show in Dubai amid coronavirus concerns

DUBAI: Italian luxury fashion house Giorgio Armani has postponed its Cruise 2021 resort show that was set to take place in April in Dubai, amid concerns over the coronavirus outbreak.

The Cruise 2021 show was originally slated to coincide with the reopening of the iconic fashion house’s flagship store, located in Dubai Mall.

According to an official release from the Italian brand, the decision “has been taken as a precautionary measure in order to protect all the industry stakeholders, employees and guests who would be involved in the trip.”

The official announcement did not mention a new date but said that the show “will be held on the occasion of Expo 2020.”

Giorgio Armani has been taking plenty of precautionary measures in light of the ongoing uncertainty prompted by the coronavirus outbreak.

Last month during Milan Fashion Week, the label showed its Fall 2020 collection to an empty theater, opting to livestream the runway on the brand’s website, Facebook and Instagram instead.

The storied label joins a slew of other fashion brands that have canceled or postponed their upcoming cruise collections, including Prada, which had been scheduled for May 21 in Tokyo and Gucci, which was due to showcase its cruise collection in San Francisco on May 18.  

The upcoming fashion weeks in Beijing and Shanghai will also be postponed due to coronavirus concerns.


‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

Updated 15 August 2020

‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

DHAHRAN: Right on the heels of “Indian Matchmaking,” Netflix acquired streaming rights to Australian dating show “Love on the Spectrum” for a global audience. While these releases offer minority groups visibility and representation in mainstream media (the Indian diaspora and adults on the autism spectrum, respectively) the latter takes a nuanced and thoughtful approach to matchmaking.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV as endorsed by “Too Hot to Handle” and “Love is Blind,” both of which were released earlier this year.

First released on the Australian Broadcast Corp. last fall, the unscripted show follows seven singles on the autism spectrum as they look for love and companionship, and two autistic couples as they make momentous relationship decisions.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV. Supplied

Unobtrusive and done respectfully, the show offers insight into their lives and vulnerabilities — what autism on the spectrum looks like for each individual, the challenges they face in social situations, and why they seek companionship. Alongside heart-warming interviews with participants and their families, the episodes feature first dates, mixer events and sessions with autism or relationship experts.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities that shine through. One cannot help but laugh out loud at 25-year-old Michael’s one-liners that double as sage advice.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities. Supplied

But while these “quirks” seem loveable and endearing to a neuro-typical audience, autistic audiences have voiced that in their quest to make a show interesting, these snippets romanticize high-functioning autism and disregard Level 3 autism (the most severe). They have also voiced a desire to see an autistic and non-autistic pairing.

At the outset, a show that follows autistic young adults in the dating world may not seem like something one can relate to. But as the five-part docuseries unravels, one can agree that the universal experience of navigating the dating world and finding love is difficult — autistic or not. With awkward first dates and heartbreak, “Love on the Spectrum” is heartfelt, authentic and real, and therein lies the appeal of the show.