How to keep your skin healthy and bright while you #StayHome

Dr. Rebecca Treston shares her tips for maintaining healthy skin while you stay at home. (File/Instagram/@bellahadid)
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Updated 30 March 2020

How to keep your skin healthy and bright while you #StayHome

DUBAI: With more and more people working from home amidst the coronavirus pandemic, there are plenty of opportunities to pamper ourselves and provide our skin with immediate relief. While the world continues to practice social-distancing in a bid to curb the spread of COVID-19, consider this the optimal time to press the reset button on your dermis. Rebecca Treston, founder of The Rebecca Treston Method, explains that following a “daily routine is key to maintaining healthy skin when you are confined to your home.” Below, she shares her top skin-boosting tips.

Cleanse your skin

“If you aren’t wearing makeup because you aren’t going to work, do not double cleanse, one cleanse is enough because you don’t want to overdo it and eliminate all the natural oils from the skin. Tone with a gentle product such as rose water to balance the pH of the skin.”


Use antioxidants

“During the day, apply antioxidants such as products that have vitamins C and E, which will give your skin a glow, but more importantly, will combat any exposure to free radicals. Ensure you use a product that has hyaluronic acid to deeply moisturize the dermis and follow this step with a skin-specific moisturizer to soothe your skin.”


Don’t forget to exfoliate

“Use a mild acid toner to exfoliate any dead skin so that your dermis can repair overnight. Try a vitamin A-based formula, a retinoid or something that comprises AHAs or BHAs, depending on your skin type. Moisturize with either vitamin E or a hydrating cream to help repair your skin while you sleep.”


Fresh air is important

“If you’re self-isolating indoors, try to get some fresh air daily, even if it’s just by opening your window.”


Indulge in a weekly face mask

“Incorporate a soothing face mask into your skincare regime. If your fruits and vegetables are getting over-ripe or are about to spoil, be creative with creating DIY face masks. Avocado is great for hydration, while oatmeal and honey are good for glowing skin. Papaya has a nice natural enzyme that is ideal for light exfoliation.”

Less is more

“Don’t overdo your skincare regime just because you’re at home and have more time. Continue to use the products that have been prescribed to you by a skincare specialist, or opt for formulas rich in antioxidants.”


REVIEW: Hijack movie ‘7500’ opts for low-key suspense

Updated 09 July 2020

REVIEW: Hijack movie ‘7500’ opts for low-key suspense

  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars in tense, claustrophobic drama

AMMAN: After a string of huge movie roles, Joseph Gordon-Levitt has taken a step back from Hollywood to focus on his family in recent years. Now, the 39-year-old is back on screen playing Tobias Ellis, the first officer on a commercial flight from Berlin to Paris. When hijackers attempt to take over the plane, Tobias winds up trapped in the cockpit while chaos unfolds just a few feet away. The film — named for the emergency code given to hijacked aircraft — is the feature debut of Patrick Vollrath, a German director with an Academy Award nomination (for the short “Everything Will Be Okay”) already to his name.

Vollrath limits the action to the cockpit of the plane, creating an almost unbearably claustrophobic atmosphere that’s only heightened by the contrasting mundanity of the opening scenes. As Tobias and his captain (played by German actor Carlo Kitzlinger) go through their checklists and procedures, the knowledge that something terrible is about to happen only ratchets up the tension, and when the situation does erupt, the brutality of the attack is shocking in the extreme.

Quite deliberately, “7500” lacks the spectacle of classic disaster movies, and though it’s fiction, the obvious similarities to events such as those aboard United Airlines Flight 93 lend the movie a sense of disconcerting resonance. Gordon-Levitt turns in a masterful performance, never once seeking to dominate the film, but capturing a sense of impotent fury and fear as his place of work — previously his comfort zone — is turned into a literal prison.

Vollrath never opts for histrionics, but lets the sparse script and his semi-improvisational style empower his lead actor to bring a raw and uncompromising edge to the performance. Vollrath sidesteps many of the usual clichés used in modern terrorist movies, making less of the reasons for the attack and instead exploring the toll exerted on both sides. There’s no music score, so the movie uses the noise of the aircraft, the attack, and the muffled sounds of the world beyond the cockpit to underline just how trapped Tobias becomes.

“7500” is not an easy film to watch, and it would be hard to describe it as ‘enjoyable,’ but it is an impressive demonstration of a director and an actor at the top of their respective games.