Un-baaaaa-lievable: Goats invade locked-down Welsh town

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A goat is seen in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Goats are seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Goats are seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A woman takes a picture of a goat in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A herd of goats is seen in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A goat is seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Updated 31 March 2020

Un-baaaaa-lievable: Goats invade locked-down Welsh town

  • With humans sheltering indoors to escape the new coronavirus, mountain goats are taking advantage of the peace and space to roam in frisky clumps through the streets of Llandudno
  • Now emboldened by the lack of people and cars, the long-horned animals are venturing deeper into the seaside town

LONDON: Un-baaaaa-lievable: This wild bunch is completely ignoring rules on social distancing.
With humans sheltering indoors to escape the new coronavirus, mountain goats are taking advantage of the peace and space to roam in frisky clumps through the streets of Llandudno, a town in North Wales.
Andrew Stuart, a video producer for the Manchester Evening News, has been posting videos of the furry adventurers on his Twitter feed and they are racking up hundreds of thousands of views.
He said the goats normally keep largely to themselves, in a country park that butts up against Llandudno. But now emboldened by the lack of people and cars, the long-horned animals are venturing deeper into the seaside town. The UK has been in lockdown for the past week to combat the spread of the coronavirus.
“There’s no one around at the moment, because of the lockdown, so they take their chances and go as far as they can. And they are going further and further into the town,” Stuart told The Associated Press in an interview Tuesday from his parents’ pub in Llandudno, where he is waiting out the pandemic.
His videos show the goats munching on people’s neatly trimmed hedges and trees in front yards and loitering casually on empty streets as if they own the place.
“One of the videos on my Twitter shows that they were on a narrow side street and I was on the other side and they were scared of me. They were edging away from me. So they are still scared of people,” Stuart said. “But when there’s hardly anyone around on the big streets, they are taking their chances, they are absolutely going for it. And I think because it’s so quiet, and there’s hardly anyone around to scare them or anything, that they just don’t really care and are eating whatever they can.”
For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.


Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

Updated 28 May 2020

Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

  • DJ Sanjay Meriya, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer

MUMBAI: As India’s financial capital Mumbai battled a growing number of coronavirus cases, local DJ Sanjay Meriya set aside his turntable and dusted off a long-unused medical degree in order to help out.
Meriya, 30, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer after spotting a government newspaper ad asking for help.
He has chiefly been visiting a slum in one of Mumbai’s worst-hit suburbs, clad in a protective suit and gloves, to instruct local residents about the precautions they should take to ward off the coronavirus.
“I’m very patriotic. I can battle this way (as a doctor),” Meriya, who signed up as a volunteer for at least three months, told Reuters.
Mumbai accounts for more than 32,000 of India’s 150,000 cases of the coronavirus, making it the worst-hit city. With government hospitals short of beds and health officials overworked, volunteers like Meriya are all the more important.
Meriya began to dabble in DJing as a hobby at around the age of 20 while studying for his medical degree, but said it then “took over me” — much to his family’s dismay.
“They hated it. They still hate it,” he said of his decision to devote himself to being a DJ.
Although worried about his potential exposure to the virus, Meriya’s family is thrilled to see him back in medicine.
“They now have a lot to share with all our relatives, if you know what I mean when it comes to Indian families,” he said.