Saudi hair care pro Waseem Sendi tackles stereotypes with beard brand

Saudi hair care pro Waseem Sendi tackles stereotypes with beard brand
Waseem Sendi addressed the importance of self-care for men, which goes far beyond looking good. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 21 April 2020

Saudi hair care pro Waseem Sendi tackles stereotypes with beard brand

Saudi hair care pro Waseem Sendi tackles stereotypes with beard brand

DUBAI: “Self-care products are not gender-specific,” said Waseem Sendi, founder of Diggn’It — a beard care brand hailing from Saudi Arabia.

Sendi addressed the importance of self-care for men, which goes far beyond looking good, he said.

“Men have been told their whole lives to ‘man up,’ which means no crying, no emotion, no growth, no softness,” Sendi said. “The problem that creates is that those natural emotions have nowhere to go, and it leads to explosions and does a disservice to our entire community.” 




Wissam Sendi is the founder of Diggn’It. (Supplied)

Sendi’s brand, that was born out of a small kitchen in his home in Saudi Arabia, was co-founded by his wife Samya Fetyani and their business partner Layal Ismail.

It is inspired by generations of Arab tradition using natural oils — like castor, cactus and sweet almond — to care for the hair.

“When we were formulating the products we spoke to our grandmothers on what they said was ‘known’ for excellent care for your hair. That was our starting point and it was important for our products to reflect the centuries of knowledge and tradition that wasn’t as known to our generation,” Sendi explained.




The brand is inspired by generations of Arab tradition using natural oils. (Supplied)

The products, that vary from beard oils to balms, softeners and wax, are also available in Arabian scents like musk, oud, rose and amber.

Sendi went on to explain why having a beard is such an important statement to him, saying he encountered a plethora of racist and stereotyped comments growing up between the Middle East and in North America. “The most common ‘joke’ was to shave before I travelled. That was just a common stereotype,” he said. 

But as the years have gone on, and beards and grooming has become more accepted, the businessman got a lot more positive comments.




The products vary from beard oils to balms, softeners and wax. (Supplied)

“Arab men with beards have spent the Age of Terror extremely conscious of their beard styles and what it looks like worldwide. We did not want to be mistaken with terrorist groups, but we still wanted to have freedom in the expressions of ourselves through our beards,” he said.

“We don’t have to all be the same, we are not all the same, but we can definitely live our vibe,” Sendi added.

Their products, which are available online at www.diggnit.com, and retailers such as Amazon, are designed in Saudi Arabia and made in the UAE.


COVID-19 kills men’s fashion buzz in Milan

COVID-19 kills men’s fashion buzz in Milan
Updated 15 January 2021

COVID-19 kills men’s fashion buzz in Milan

COVID-19 kills men’s fashion buzz in Milan

MILAN: A year after the last COVID-free catwalk shows in Milan, men’s fashion week begins on Friday, but without the buzz of its traditional audience of buyers, bloggers, celebrities and media.

As the pandemic continues to upend Italy’s crucial luxury sector nearly 12 months after it first swept through the country, fashion houses have turned to technology to showcase their fall/winter 2021-22 collections.

Shows will be broadcast live on the fashion houses’ own websites or be replaced with pre-recorded presentations, short films and other artistic projects. Others such as Dolce & Gabbana have withdrawn entirely.

The four-day men’s fashion event takes place with infections rising in Italy’s Lombardy region with a return a full lockdown possible as early as the weekend.

Lombardy, whose capital is Milan, is one of five in Italy classified “orange” by the government, which means that stores and most schools are closed, while a curfew remains in force at night.

Among those opting for live shows to be broadcast by the fashion houses are Fendi, Etro and Kway.

Most other brands, however, including Ermenegildo Zegna, Tod’s, Prada and Church’s, have opted for pre-records – choices that allow for creative freedom but lack the immediacy and drama of live shows.

Dolce & Gabbana, which was originally scheduled to offer a traditional runway show on January 16, announced on Monday its decision to pull out entirely.

In view of COVID-19, it said, “the conditions essential to the realisation of our fashion show are not met.”

For the moment, no digital presentation is planned.