Emirati police deploy smart tech in coronavirus fight

Police wear smart helmets to check workers’ temperatures amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Dubai. Reuters United Arab Emirates April 23, 2020. Picture taken April 23, 2020. (REUTERS)
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Updated 25 April 2020

Emirati police deploy smart tech in coronavirus fight

  • Dubai’s police are using the helmets to screen people in densely populated areas, including sealed neighborhoods

Police in the UAE are deploying smart helmets that can scan the temperatures of hundreds of people every minute to combat the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
The helmets, which need less time and less contact than traditional thermometers, can measure temperatures from five metres (16 feet) away and scan up to 200 people a minute, triggering an alert if a fever is detected.
Chinese company KC Wearable says it has sold more than 1,000 of the temperature scanning helmets and has received orders from the Middle East, Europe and Asia.
“We’ve implemented the smart helmet during this time of crisis, with COVID-19, across all police stations in Dubai, as well as at patrolling stations whose duty requires them to be on the frontline,” police officer Aly Al-Ramsy told Reuters.
“In the case of someone with a high temperature, we take the necessary measures to stop the person ... and then the person is dealt with by paramedics and taken to the closest medical facility.”
Dubai’s police are using the helmets to screen people in densely populated areas, including sealed neighborhoods.
Gulf states have ramped up testing after recording a growing number of cases among low-income migrant workers in overcrowded housing.
The UAE has the second highest infection count among the six Gulf states, with more than 8,000, and over 50 deaths. It does not provide a breakdown for each of its seven emirates.
Like other countries around the world, Gulf states have deployed technology in the struggle to rein in the virus, including smartphone apps that track sufferers. Civil liberties groups have criticised such apps as an invasion of privacy.


China aims for sustained and healthy economic development

Updated 30 October 2020

China aims for sustained and healthy economic development

  • Beijing to let market forces play decisive role in resources allocation, report says

BEIJING: China is targeting sustained and healthy economic development in the five years to 2025, with an emphasis on a higher quality of growth, the Xinhua news agency said on Thursday, citing the ruling Communist Party’s Central Committee.

President Xi Jinping and members of the Central Committee, the largest of the ruling party’s elite decision-making bodies, met behind closed doors from Monday to lay out the 14th five-year plan, a blueprint for economic and social development.

China’s external environment “is getting more complicated,” the agency said, adding, “There is a significant increase in instabilities and uncertainties.”

BACKGROUND

China aims to boost its gross domestic product (GDP) per person to the level of moderately developed countries by 2035, while GDP is due to top 100 trillion yuan ($15 trillion) in 2020.

However, the country’s development was still in a period of important strategic opportunities, despite new challenges, it said.

It added that China aims to boost its gross domestic product (GDP) per person to the level of moderately developed countries by 2035, while GDP is due to top 100 trillion yuan ($15 trillion) in 2020.

China will also deepen reforms and let market forces play a decisive role in resources allocation, the agency said.

China will promote a “dual circulation” model, make self-sufficiency in technology a strategic pillar for development, move to develop and urbanize regions, and combine efforts to expand domestic demand with supply-side reforms, it added.

The “dual circulation” strategy, first proposed by Xi in May, envisages that China’s next phase of development will depend mainly on “domestic circulation” or an internal cycle of production, distribution and consumption, backed by domestic technological innovation.