Artist Firouz Farmanfarmaian turns confinement into creativity with his first virtual exhibition

1 / 4
Firouz Farmanfarmaian. (Image supplied)
2 / 4
'Confinement' by Firouz Farmanfarmaian. (Image supplied)
3 / 4
'New Form IV' by Firouz Farmanfarmaian. (Image supplied)
4 / 4
A sketch from Firouz Farmanfarmaian's 'Let's Get Lost (Let Them Send Out Alarms)' exhibition. (Image supplied)
Short Url
Updated 27 April 2020

Artist Firouz Farmanfarmaian turns confinement into creativity with his first virtual exhibition

  • For his latest work, the artist used only materials on hand in his studio

LONDON: When multidisciplinary artist Firouz Farmanfarmaian went into lockdown at his studio in Marbella, Spain, in March, he didn’t realize his time in confinement would be a period of intense creativity leading to his first ever participation in a VR exhibition.

Prior to isolation, Farmanfarmaian spent six months in the Draa Valley in South Morocco, working closely with local Amazigh artisans and painting in the deserted streets of abandoned ‘ghost’ villages — once populated by Berbers and, further back, by Jews.

He told Arab News that the first few days in confinement after his time in the wide open spaces of the Draa Valley had been “pretty brutal.” Then, out of the blue, a phone exchange with his agent Janet Rady led to the launch of a collaborative multi-platform digital exhibition available across Artsy, the Janet Rady Fine Arts (JRFA) website, Nouvelle Vague Artspaces, Kunsmatrix VR exhibition and Instagram.




Work in progress in Firouz Farmanfarmaian's studio in Marbella. (Image supplied)

“Let's Get Lost (Let Them Send Out Alarms),” which runs until May 13, features art that Farmanfarmaian created using only materials immediately on hand in his studio. In part this was due to the logistical restrictions of the lockdown, but  it was also a result of his admiration for the concept of ‘junkspace’ defined by the Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas as “what remains after modernization has run its course or, more precisely, what coagulates while modernization is in progress, its fallout.”

Farmanfarmaian worked with companies in the industrial area of Marbella where his studio is based, taking delivery of their unused materials and repurposing them for his art.

“I used industrial glue on wood and acrylic markers and plastic paint with a lot of texturization,” he said. “We are living through dark times so I logically went towards a darker type of palette which reflects the reality that people are dying in this plague and the mood I am in right now.” The muted colors also reflect the desert landscapes he was working in before the lockdown.

Farmanfarmaian also used an oval shape as a motif in his work for the first time. A departure from the triangle and cosmic cross that feature prominently in his preceding work. “When I used the triangle and cosmic cross they would be shown with an encasing. I slowly started in this series to move forward into this new form, in which the triangle and cross have disappeared and only the encasing, which had originally been created just to give them perspective, stayed,” he explained.




Work from Firouz Farmanfarmaian's 'Let's Get Lost (Let Them Send Out Alarms)' exhibition. (Image supplied)

There is a strong architectural feel to Farmanfarmaian’s work, a legacy of his grandfather, the pioneering architect Abdul Aziz Farmanfarmaian, whose extensive legacy includes high-profile projects in Saudi Arabia where he worked after the Iranian revolution. Although Farmanfarmaian studied architecture, he did not follow his grandfather into the profession. After three years he chose to switch to studying graphic design, but he recognizes “there is an element of architectonics in my work.”

In his work, you sense Farmanfarmaian searching for his lost roots. He left Iran aged four when his family moved to Spain because of the revolution. He was largely educated in Paris, under the guidance of his grandfather. He is also powerfully influenced by the concept of ‘trace,’ as espoused by the late French philosopher Edouard Glissant.

“His idea was that the archaic cultures and memory have to be revisited and put forward again in order for to us to communicate better today,” Farmanfarmaian said

This philosophy influenced his post-tribal exhibition “Memorandum of the Unknown Path,” a powerful site-specific installation in the main halls of the Théâtre Royal de Marrakech for the 1-54 Marrakech 2020 African art fair. This work is currently going through the qualification process for the Jameel Prize, echoing the footsteps of his late great aunt, the celebrated artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, who was a finalist in 2011.

For Farmanfarmaian, the coronavirus has meant isolation but also intense creativity and exploration of new ways of communicating. He believes it is the responsibility of artists to give hope in times of darkness.

“We are adaptive creatures and every situation can also be a blessing,” he said.


Elvis Presley’s only grandson dies aged 27

Updated 13 July 2020

Elvis Presley’s only grandson dies aged 27

LOS ANGELES: A little-known member of one of rock ‘n’ roll music’s royal families, Benjamin Keough, grandson of the late Elvis Presley and only son of the “The King’s” daughter, Lisa Marie Presley, has died aged 27, her spokesman said on Sunday.

There was no immediate word from authorities on the circumstances or timing of Keough’s death. The Los Angeles County coroner’s office confirmed only that the death of an individual of his name and age was under investigation.

Citing unnamed law enforcement sources, celebrity news website TMZ said Keough had taken his own life on Sunday in Calabasas, California, a community northwest of Los Angeles. That information could not be independently verified.

Keough was the younger of the two children Lisa Marie Presley had by her first husband, musician Danny Keough, before their divorce in 1994. The other is actress Riley Keough, 31.

Presley, 52, singer-songwriter in her own right, also has twin 11-year-old daughters with her fourth husband, musician-producer Michael Lockwood, whom she wed in 2006 after two brief marriages, to pop star Michael Jackson and actor Nicolas Cage.

She is the only offspring of rock pioneer Presley, by his marriage to actress Priscilla Presley.

Lisa Marie Presley’s only son, who kept a low public profile, bore an uncanny resemblance to his grandfather, widely acclaimed as the “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” who died in 1977.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Flashback!!!! Backstage with Ben @opry on

A post shared by Lisa Marie Presley (@lisampresley) on

“She is completely heartbroken, inconsolable and beyond devastated, but trying to stay strong for her 11-year-old twins and her oldest daughter Riley,” Roger Widynowksi, a spokesman for Lisa Marie Presley’s manager, said in a statement.

“She adored that boy. He was the love of her life.”

Her close relationship to her son, whose middle name was Storm, was reported to have inspired the title track she wrote for her third album, “Storm & Grace,” released in 2012.

One of the last times he was seen in public with the family, according to TMZ, was during a vigil at Graceland for the 40th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

Benjamin Keough was himself a musician who struck a record deal and had earned a couple of acting credits in his burgeoning career, TMZ added.