What We Are Reading Today: Troop 6000

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Updated 24 May 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Troop 6000

Troop 6000 is a fact-based history of a Girl Scout troop which began in a homeless/crisis shelter in New York City and the woman behind its genesis.
Troop 6000 “is the ultimate story of how when we come together, we can improve our circumstances, find support and commonality, and experience joy, no matter how challenging life may be,” said a review in goodreads.com.
New York Times journalist Nikita Stewart embedded with Troop 6000 for more than a year, at the peak of New York City’s homelessness crisis in 2017, spending time with the girls and their families and witnessing both their triumphs and challenges.
Stewart “takes the reader with her as she paints intimate portraits of Giselle’s family and the others whom she met along the way. Readers will feel an instant connection and express joy when a family finally moves out of the shelter and into a permanent home, as well as the pain of the day-to-day life of homelessness,” said the review.


What We Are Reading Today: The Cubans by Anthony DePalma

Updated 31 May 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Cubans by Anthony DePalma

The Cubans from Anthony DePalma, a former foreign correspondent for The New York Times,  is a must-read for anyone interested in Latin America, say critics.

“In his thoroughly researched and reported book, replete with human detail and probing insight, DePalma renders a Cuba few tourists will ever see,” said Marie Arana in a review for  The New York Times.

DePalma burrows deep into one enclave of Havana, the historic borough of Guanabacoa, some three miles southeast of the capital.

“Lying across the famous harbor from the city center, Guanabacoa is close enough to have ties to Havana’s businesses, politics and culture,” he writes.

“Yet it operates at its own speed, with its own idiosyncrasies and an overriding sense, as one Cuban told me, of ‘geographic fatalism’ that comes from being so close to the capital, yet so very hard to reach from there.”

The book sadly leaves scant hope that anything will change in Cuba in the foreseeable future, but is testament to the resilience and ingenuity of the Cuban people.