UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, Kathryn Jones learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 25 May 2020

UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

DUBAI: Skincare products can quite often sit on shelfs or in delivery vehicles for weeks and months, stored in unsuitable conditions.

And despite brands promoting them as organic and natural, some customers might question the effectiveness of products left lying around for long periods after being produced.

However, Kathryn Jones, founder of the UAE-based brand Kathryn Jones Hand Blended Serums, or KJ Serums for short, told Arab News how her company created fresh products every month for customers.




Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.” (Supplied)

“The concept of a freshly-made skincare serum is something quite different and our customers have really embraced it. They appreciate it’s a fresh product that must be used up within a month when it’s at its most active and effective and repurchased – almost like a food stuff,” she said.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.”

She added: “I simply could not afford the prices of some of the top skincare brands but still wanted excellent results.”

With her background in the biopharmaceuticals industry, she started experimenting and developing her own formulas. “The core proposition is ‘hand blended’ because that’s how it all started, by hand blending and perfecting the serum formulas myself here in the UAE,” she said.

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, the entrepreneur learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region.

“Our climate here is extreme often for eight months or more of the year, especially in the Gulf region. A lot our customers will ask for a product that reduces oiliness and sheen on the skin and are reluctant to purchase products that contain a lot of oils, or are very heavily moisturizing,” Jones added.

The businesswoman believes the Middle East market is “wonderfully diverse” with different attitudes and expectations toward skincare products.

“Of course, this is a challenge to develop effective products which can address many different skin types and issues, but the market is truly receptive to new concepts,” she said.

Jones pointed out that with the current lockdown situation due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people had more time to care for their skin.

“The coronavirus pandemic has obviously confined us to our homes, and, given the steady increase in the number of enquiries we are receiving, it suggests consumers currently have more time to consider their online skincare purchases and perhaps have more time to invest in an effective routine,” she said.

On whether the COVID-19 outbreak would change the future of the skincare industry, Jones added: “I think that many consumers, either through necessity or out of a desire to support local brands might have chosen to source their products from different manufacturers and therefore brand loyalties may have been affected to a certain extent.”


Depp says wife-beating claim made him ‘Quasimodo’

Updated 10 July 2020

Depp says wife-beating claim made him ‘Quasimodo’

  • The High Court trial revolves around a 2018 headline in The Sun asking how JK Rowling could be happy casting ‘wife-beater’ Depp in a ‘Fantastic Beasts’ film
  • Johnny Depp: ‘I went from Cinderella into Quasimodo in 0.6 seconds and I was without a voice’

LONDON: Hollywood legend Johnny Depp on Friday accused Britain’s The Sun tabloid of turning him from “Cinderella into Quasimodo” by claiming he beat his ex-wife Amber Heard.
The first week of Depp’s star-studded libel trial against the paper’s publisher and executive editor drew to a close with the 57-year-old denying hurling a champagne bottle and a phone at his former wife.
Depp claims charges compiled by Heard over a tumultuous two-year marriage that ended in 2017 were a “hoax” designed to advance her career at his expense.
The “Pirates of the Caribbean” actor said Thursday he was so often high or strung out on drugs that he was “in no condition” to hurt the 34-year-old model and film star.
The High Court trial revolves around a 2018 headline in The Sun asking how JK Rowling could be happy casting “wife-beater” Depp in a “Fantastic Beasts” film.
Depp said the headline altered his Hollywood image and endangered his career.
“I went from Cinderella into Quasimodo in 0.6 seconds and I was without a voice,” he told the court.
“That’s where I was in my life at that point.”
Cinderella is a beautiful fairy tale princess and Quasimodo the disfigured protagonist of Victor Hugo’s novel “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.”
Depp looked more confident and engaged on the fourth day of the three-week trial than he appeared at its start.
He listened alertly in an olive suit and verbally clashed with publisher News Group Newspapers’ (NGN) lawyer Sasha Wass in an attempt to refute her various charges.
Wass has gone chronologically through each of Depp’s 14 alleged assaults and other abuses.
She attempted on Friday to complete her depiction of the US superstar as self-centered and out of touch with reality due to debilitating drug abuse.
Depp countered that it was Heard who was chronically looking for a fight.
He said he went to read in bed on the night of Heard’s 30th birthday party because “I was trying to avoid another confrontation with Ms Heard about something that didn’t go exactly as she wanted or had planned.”
Depp turned up for the party two hours late because of a difficult business meeting about a financial dispute.
But Wass said Depp was fuming because Heard had pointed out one of his character faults.
“And the argument picked up pace and you picked up the bottle of champagne and you threw it at Ms Heard. And it missed and the bottle hit the wall and it smashed,” the lawyer said.
“And that, I suggest, is how you express yourself when you are angry, you smash things,” the lawyer said.
Depp denied this happened and countered: “I disagree.”
The couple’s marriage was all but over by the time Heard accused Depp of hitting her in the face with a phone in May 2016.
Wass said Depp “wound up like a baseball pitcher” and threw it at his wife at one of their mansions while one of Heard’s friends was on the other line.
Depp denied this but admitted that Heard asked the friend to call the police.
He also said the security on site witnessed how the entire episode was staged.
“She was screaming ‘stop hitting me, Johnny!, stop hitting me, Johnny!’, and the security came and she was still screaming... and I was 20 feet away getting something from the fridge,” Depp said.
“And then (one of the guards) said boss, let’s get out of here.”
Wass’ cross-examination ended with a 30-minute private session in which reporters were asked to leave the courtroom.
The actor’s attorney David Sherborne then took over by directly asking whether Depp had ever hit a woman.
“Never, no sir,” Depp replied.
Sherborne also got Depp to confirm that no other woman had alleged abuse in his past relationships.