What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

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Updated 05 June 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

It is always refreshing to stumble across a new eatery and for me, this was one unexpected bonus to come out of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) quarantine period.

Gripped by a sudden lockdown craving for sushi, I took to the HungerStation app to search for a suitable Japanese restaurant and found Shiro.

Opened in Riyadh in 2017, it has yet to achieve the recognition of other sushi chains such as Sushi Yoshi, Tokyo, or Nozomi. But my first experience of Shiro certainly set my taste buds buzzing.

From the standard California roll to the more adventurous dragon-eye fry, Shiro’s menu covers a wide range of the sushi spectrum, including traditional, purist-friendly sashimi.

I would recommend the deep-fried, sauce-doused special avocado fry, as well as the rainbow roll California, and the mixed tempura futomaki. For a tamer option, go for the classic temaki.

The restaurant also offers dishes to satisfy non-sushi palates, which can help settle family debates over which outlet to order from.

One of the menu highlights was Shiro’s miso soup with its perfectly balanced flavors. My fellow diners also enjoyed the crab salad, which came with a lovely light dressing, crunchy sweetcorn, and baby corn, and the chicken noodles were another big hit.

Shiro gives customers the option to customize any of its wok entrees, and we chose chicken, udon noodles, and teriyaki sauce. The udon noodles are the real deal; thick, chewy, and utterly satisfying. Orders can be made online at https://shiro.com.sa or via HungerStation.


Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port, covering 500 families. (SPA)
Updated 10 August 2020

Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

  • So far, 290 tons of aid transported to provide urgent humanitarian needs to people affected by explosion

JEDDAH: Aid continues to flow into the Lebanese capital Beirut, as the fourth Saudi air bridge plane operated by the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) arrived on Sunday.
Ninety tons of emergency aid was flown in on the flight, including medical materials and equipment, foodstuff and shelter supplies. Medicines, burn treatments, medical solutions, masks, gloves, sterilizers and other surgical materials will be distributed by special teams on the ground.
The plane also carried food baskets that included flour and dates as well as shelter materials such as tents, blankets, mattresses, and utensils.
So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.
This aid was provided based on an assessment report of the necessary humanitarian needs resulting from the explosion, in coordination with the Saudi Embassy in Beirut, and the KSRelief branch in Lebanon.
This comes as an extension of the efforts made by Saudi Arabia to show solidarity with the Lebanese people and to provide relief to those affected by the disaster.

FASTFACT

So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port on Sunday, covering 500 families.
Saudi Ambassador to Lebanon Waleed bin Abdullah Bukhari told Arab News that special committees would oversee and review reports on the Lebanese people’s needs.
“Aid will continue to flow into Lebanon after assessing the required needs of the Lebanese people in cooperation with the relevant authorities in Lebanon,” he said.
Countries around the world have come together to help Lebanon in the wake of the explosion on Aug. 4, which devastated large areas of Beirut, damaging and destroying infrastructure, buildings and homes, including all port facilities and the country’s grain storage silos.