UAE vital sector workers to get bonuses for coronavirus efforts

Al-Maktoum has approved of several other initiatives during the cabinet meeting. (WAM)
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Updated 15 June 2020

UAE vital sector workers to get bonuses for coronavirus efforts

  • The initiative aims to show gratitude and appreciation for individuals who were a big part in bearing the burden of COVID-19
  • Al-Maktoum has approved of several other initiatives during the cabinet meeting

UAE vital sector workers to get bonuses for coronavirus efforts 
DUBAI: UAE cabinet set a system and criteria to provide bonuses for vital sector workers as a show of gratitude for their efforts during the coronavirus pandemic.
The initiative aims to show gratitude and appreciation for individuals who were a big part in bearing the burden of COVID-19, Dubai ruler Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum said in a tweet.
“Today, we decided on a system and set criteria for determining bonuses for workers in vital jobs in emergencies… appreciation is due to everyone who has contributed in bearing the burdens of the crisis with us,” the Prime Minister and Vice President tweeted.

Al-Maktoum has approved of several other initiatives during the cabinet meeting, such as launching the Governance System for the Federal Government Board to improve transparency and efficiency and the creation of Al-Etihad Digital Payments Company as a national platform for quick digital payments.
The UAE has reported 42,294 coronavirus infections, 27,462 recoveries and 289 deaths as of June 14.


Lucky baby anteater escapes birds, falls from tree into care of Australian zoo

Updated 21 October 2020

Lucky baby anteater escapes birds, falls from tree into care of Australian zoo

  • The echidna will remain at the Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital until it grows spines and can feed itself

SYDNEY: A lucky echidna puggle, or baby spiny anteater, that survived an attack by birds and fell from a tree is taking its first steps as zoo keepers in Australia hand-feed the young mammal.
Members of the public brought the young echidna to the Taronga Zoo in Sydney last month after it fell 4 meters from a tree onto their balcony, somehow escaping becoming supper for the winner of a clash between a raven and a magpie.
“He was lost from his mum and the story is that some people were just sitting on their balcony one nice afternoon and they heard this thud and they looked down and they saw this little guy on the balcony,” said Taronga Zoo Senior Keeper Sarah Male.
“And they’ve looked up into the tree and seen a raven and a magpie there.”
After recovering from scratches and peck marks, the puggle – grey, sharp-nosed and easily held in the palm of one hand – has put on weight and started to develop fur, Male said.
“While the puggle is improving every day, it is still very young and in the wild would still be dependent on mum, so will require ongoing care for the next few months,” she said in an emailed statement.
“I’ve hand-raised lots of animals throughout the years at Taronga but such a young echidna puggle is a new experience.”
The echidna will remain at the Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital until it grows spines and can feed itself. The zoo said it hasn’t made plans for the animal beyond that.
Echidnas and platypuses are the only two species belonging to the monotreme order of egg-laying mammals. Their young are known as puggles.