Tokyo sees biggest rise in coronavirus cases in two months

Tokyo had initially sought to hold new daily cases at fewer than 20 after the government lifted the state of emergency on May 25. (Reuters)
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Updated 02 July 2020

Tokyo sees biggest rise in coronavirus cases in two months

  • About 70 percent of cases on Thursday were among people in their 20s and 30s

TOKYO: Tokyo confirmed 107 new coronavirus infections on Thursday, its highest daily tally in two months, but Japan’s chief cabinet secretary said there was no need to reintroduce a state of emergency.
The Japanese capital, with 14 million people, had initially sought to hold new daily cases at fewer than 20 after the government lifted the state of emergency on May 25, only to see its tally consistently exceed 50 over the past week.
Tokyo’s daily count last rose above 100 on May 2. On Wednesday, it confirmed 67 new cases.
Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said about 70 percent of cases on Thursday were among people in their 20s and 30s.
“It’s really unpleasant that it is increasing somewhat. I’d like to ask all Tokyo residents and everyone at businesses for their cooperation to prevent that,” she said.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters he didn’t think there was a need for a fresh state of emergency.
“We’ll continue to pay attention to the infection situation in the area with a sense of urgency, and work to both prevent spreading of infection and support economic activity,” he said.
Officials have also said the medical system can handle existing infections and that increased testing partly explains the rise in confirmed cases.
Despite more cases in Tokyo, Japan, with about 19,000 cases and 976 deaths, has reported a lower overall rate of infection than many countries.
More than 10.7 million people have been reported to be infected by the coronavirus globally and over 515,000 have died, according to a Reuters tally.
This week, Tokyo said it would move away from numerical targets in favor of more reliance on expert advice to rein in the virus and avert more economic damage.


Lebanese diaspora in London protest in support of Beirut protesters

Updated 26 min 1 sec ago

Lebanese diaspora in London protest in support of Beirut protesters

  • At least 100 people — both Lebanese and non-Lebanese — showed up at the protest denouncing government corruption and negligence following the port explosion that killed at least 158 people
  • Many of the chants at the London protest targeted politicians from across Lebanon’s ruling elite, including Hezbollah Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah

LONDON: The Lebanese diaspora in London gathered in Hyde Park on Saturday in a protest showing solidarity for those demonstrating in Beirut.

At least 100 people — both Lebanese and non-Lebanese — showed up at the protest denouncing government corruption and negligence following the port explosion that killed at least 158 people, injured more than 6,000 and left 300,000 homeless.

“It is very important to show support and solidarity with our fellow Lebanese protesting in the country,” one protester said. “Here in London we can peacefully protest, but those in Lebanon must go through attacks by both the internal security forces and political leaders’ thugs.”

Many of the chants at the London protest targeted politicians from across Lebanon’s ruling elite, including Hezbollah Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah.

“Terrorist, terrorist, Hassan Nasrallah is a terrorist,” was one of the slogans chanted at the protest.

Another was: “All of them means all of them, and your leader is one of them.”

The Lebanese national anthem was played at the beginning of the protest following a moment of silence to honor those who were killed in the explosion. Protesters were seen breaking down in tears as the names of those who died were read aloud.

Posters carried pictures of the victims, with others carrying the message that “their blood is on your hands” — referencing the government’s negligence around the cause of the explosion.

The Lebanese government announced that 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate was located in one of the warehouses in the port and was the main cause of the blast’s immense power. Lebanese President Michel Aoun did not rule out the involvement of foreign interference.

“The incident might be a result of negligence or external intervention through a missile or a bomb,” Aoun said on Friday.