Israel cenbank’s Abir says buying corporate bonds to prevent layoffs

Bank of Israel Deputy Governor Andrew Abir poses for a picture in his office in Jerusalem July 8, 2020. (Reuters)
Updated 08 July 2020

Israel cenbank’s Abir says buying corporate bonds to prevent layoffs

JERUSALEM: The Bank of Israel’s decision to start buying corporate bonds should enable companies to issue debt and prevent further layoffs as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, deputy governor Andrew Abir said.
On Monday, the bank held its benchmark interest rate at 0.1 percent but said it would buy 15 billion shekels ($4 billion) of higher-rated corporate bonds in the secondary market.
“It’s not that the corporate bond market was not functioning or because spreads have widened dramatically, but rather the understanding that over the next 6-12 months, there’s going to be a need for issuance in that market,” Abir told Reuters.
The central bank began purchases on March 15 of up to 50 billion shekels of government bonds, which has helped reverse a spike in government and corporate yields.
The index of bonds issued by Israel’s 20 largest firms has gained 1.4 percent following the central bank’s announcement, following three weeks of declines.
Noting that more than 40 percent of corporate credit comes from the bond market, Abir said that fear of being frozen out the market could lead to cash hoarding and cost-cutting, including jobs.
“We want to prevent a situation where a company is having question marks in its ability to fund themselves (and) lays off another 1,000 workers.”
Unemployment is already more than 20 percent and could worsen after some COVID-19 restrictions were reimposed.
Abir said risks to the central bank’s scenario of a record six percent economic contraction in 2020 will be “to the downside” if the infection rate stays high.
Analysts are split over whether the central bank will lower its key rate to zero percent or negative. The Bank of Israel has indicated it is reluctant to do so.
“We still have more measures that we can do. QE can be increased. We haven’t run out of our policy options,” Abir said.


Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

Updated 03 August 2020

Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

  • Xiao-i argued that Apple’s voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004

SHANGHAI: Chinese artificial intelligence company Shanghai Zhizhen Intelligent Network Technology Co., also known as Xiao-i, has filed a lawsuit against Apple, alleging it has infringed on its patents.
The company is calling for $1.43 billion in damages and demands that Apple cease “manufacturing, using, promising to sell, selling, and importing” products that infringe on the patent, it said in a social media post.
Xiao-i argued that Apple’s voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004 and was granted in 2009.
Apple did not respond to a request for comment. Reuters was not immediately available to find a copy of the court filing.
The lawsuit marks the continuation of a row that has been ongoing for nearly a decade.
Shanghai Zhizhen first sued Apple for patent infringement in 2012 regarding its voice recognition technology. In July, China’s Supreme People’s court ruled that the patent was valid.