Beefed up: Indonesia’s sacrifice ritual to rake in $1.4bn despite pandemic

Beefed up: Indonesia’s sacrifice ritual to rake in $1.4bn despite pandemic
The Qurbani could involve about 117 tonnes of sacrificed meat. (AFP)
Short Url
Updated 30 July 2020

Beefed up: Indonesia’s sacrifice ritual to rake in $1.4bn despite pandemic

Beefed up: Indonesia’s sacrifice ritual to rake in $1.4bn despite pandemic
  • Increased meat donations ‘could help reduce rural malnutrition,’ experts say

JAKARTA: Eid Al-Adha festivities in Indonesia could generate 20.5 trillion rupiahs ($1.4 billion) this year, based on purchases made by an estimated 2.3 million families for the annual sacrifice.

The Qurbani could involve about 117 tonnes of sacrificed meat, offering a chance to increase the country’s low beef consumption and address its malnutrition problem, if officials can address unequal meat distribution, according to a June study by the Institute for Demographic and Poverty Studies.

The study found that the middle-upper class Muslim families of the country is 9 percent, or 5.6 million of the 62.4 million total Muslim families of the world’s largest predominantly Muslim country.

“Out of those in the middle-upper class bracket, we estimated 40 percent would buy a Qurbani cattle, based on a conservative assumption that one family would donate just one cattle, either a cow or a goat, given the economic slowdown from the COVID-19 pandemic,” Askar Muhammad, a researcher at the Jakarta-based think tank, told Arab News.

However, about 71 percent of those families are concentrated in the capital Jakarta and other cities in Java, Indonesia’s most populated island, causing concern that there could be a surplus of sacrificed meat in some areas, also in Muslim-minority regions, such as on Papua island, where there are not enough beneficiaries.

Muhammad said a scheme is needed to help beneficiaries in remote areas of Java and other islands access sacrificed meat for the festival.

“For most beneficiaries, this could be the only time of the year when they have the opportunity to consume meat,” he said.

He said: “This is also a good window for us to improve public health and nutrition levels, considering that our average meat consumption is low.”

Indonesia’s beef and sheep meat consumption stands at an annual 2.4 kg per capita, well below the global average of 8.1 kg, according to 2019 data from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

“Most beneficiaries also do not have the means to preserve fresh meat for later consumption and cooking the meat would require extra costs. The meat could also spoil during the distribution process to regions where beneficiaries are concentrated,” said Ali Nurhasan, head of the Qurbani committee at Muslim charity Rumah Zakat.

Nurhasan said the group has been tackling the problem since 2003 by distributing donated sacrificed meat as canned and corned beef or rendang, a West Sumatran specialty dish of slow-cooked beef.

In 2019, the Indonesian Ulema Council issued a fatwa, which allowed the preservation of sacrificed meat in cooked and canned form for later use.

“Our priority is to distribute the cans to beneficiaries in areas where donators are, but we also set aside cans as a national stock for distribution to remote areas and survivors of disasters, such as the recent flash floods in Masamba,” Nurhasan said, referring to the July 13 flash floods which struck in South Sulawesi province, killing 38 people and displacing more than 14,000.

Each can of ready-to-eat beef weighs 200 gm and has a two-year expiration date. Every year an average of 100,000 cans, from 20,000 donators, are distributed.

For each lamb that is sacrificed, the group processes the meat into about 30 cans of corned beef or 25 cans of rendang, while for each cow, the meat is processed into about 350 corned beef or 235 cans of rendang.

“Usually we would be out of stock in less than a year considering Indonesia is a disaster-prone country and quick distribution of nutritious, ready-to-eat beef for displaced survivors is preferable to other instant food normally distributed during disasters,” Nurhasan said.

Meanwhile, the National Zakat Agency (Baznas) expects to slaughter 3,500 cattle this year by buying sacrificial animals from local breeders and distributing the meat to 70,000 families in poor and remote regions across Indonesia, after donators buy cattle through the agency’s online platform.

“By buying and slaughtering our sacrificial cattle on the spot in targeted areas, donators will help to empower local farmers and the meat could be distributed to local beneficiaries right away,” said Arifin Purwakanta, the president-director of Baznas.


Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries
Updated 15 January 2021

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries
  • Pfizer said the modifications at the Puurs factory were necessary in order to ramp up its production capacity from mid-February of the vaccine
  • There will be “a significant increase” in deliveries in late February and March, the US group promised

BERLIN: A global coronavirus vaccine rollout suffered a major blow Friday as Pfizer said it would delay shipments of the jabs in the next three to four weeks due to works at its key plant in Belgium.
Pfizer said the modifications at the Puurs factory were necessary in order to ramp up its production capacity from mid-February of the vaccine developed with Germany’s BioNTech.
There will be “a significant increase” in deliveries in late February and March, the US group promised. The European Commission also confirmed that promised doses for the first quarter will arrive within the period.
But European Union nations, which are desperately waiting for more doses to immunize their populations against the virus that has already claimed almost two million lives worldwide, expressed frustration.
Germany, the EU’s biggest economy, voiced regret over the “last minute and unexpected” delay.
It urged the European Commission — which undertook joint procurement for the bloc — to “seek clarity and certainty” for upcoming shipments.
Six northern EU nations also warned in a letter to the Commission that the “unacceptable” situation “decreases the credibility of the vaccination process.”
The letter signed by ministers from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden further asked the Commission to “demand a public explanation of the situation” from the pharmaceutical companies.
Across the Atlantic, Canada also said it was impacted by the delays, calling it “unfortunate.”
“However, such delays and issues are to be expected when global supply chains are stretched well beyond their limits,” said Canada’s Procurement Minister Anita Anand.
Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccine, which was developed at record-breaking speed, became the first to be approved for general use by a Western country on December 2 when Britain gave it the go ahead.
After Britain rolled out its immunization drive, the EU followed from December 27.
The latest shipment delay will likely add fuel to anger over the bloc’s vaccination campaign, which has already been criticized for being too slow compared to the United States or former EU member Britain.
The European Commission has also been accused of not securing enough doses early enough.
Just last week, the EU struck a deal to double its supply of the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine to 600 million doses.
The urgency of immunizing the population has grown over fears of virus variants first seen in South Africa and Britain, which officials warn are more infectious.
But vaccine makers had repeatedly warned that production capacity was limited.
While Pfizer is augmenting capacity at Puurs, its partner BioNTech on Friday secured authorization to begin production at Germany’s Marburg.
The challenges of getting millions of vaccines around the world are also huge as the BioNTech/Pfizer jabs must be stored at ultra-low temperatures of about minus 70 degrees Celsius (-94 Fahrenheit) before being shipped to distribution centers in specially-designed cool boxes filled with dry ice.
Once out of ultra-cold storage, the vaccine must be kept at two Celsius to eight Celsius to remain effective for up to five days.