Hajj season nears end with no COVID-19 at holy sites

Pilgrims pray at Jamarat after throwing stones at the symbolic Satan. (SPA)
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Updated 02 August 2020

Hajj season nears end with no COVID-19 at holy sites

  • Grand Mosque cleaned 10 times a day during the pandemic crisis

MAKKAH: Pilgrims returned to the Jamarat Bridge for the stoning ritual on Saturday, the fourth day of Hajj, as the season neared an end with no cases of COVID-19 at the holy sites.

The Saudi Health Ministry said the pilgrims’ health status was reassuring, and there had been no public health issues this season.

The Grand Mosque was sterilized and disinfected after pilgrims completed their Tawaf Al-Ifada ritual on the third day of Hajj. 

The mosque has been cleaned 10 times a day during the pandemic crisis.

Dr. Amani Al-Saadi, a health mentor taking part in Hajj this year, said the pilgrims’ health status was monitored from when they left their accommodation until they returned at the end of the day.

Each pilgrim had a designated seat on the Hajj buses to reduce contact with others, and there was a medical clinic at each residence complex, where doctors checked the pilgrims’ health and supplied any required medication.

Farida, an Indonesian pilgrim, was among those privileged to perform Hajj this year.

She said being selected was “unbelievable and priceless,” and expressed her happiness and gratitude at being able to perform the once-in-a-lifetime duty.

“This is like a blessing for me from Allah before I leave Saudi Arabia for good,” she said. “It was very well organized, I take my hat off to the Ministry of Hajj and Ministry of Health.”


Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port, covering 500 families. (SPA)
Updated 10 August 2020

Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

  • So far, 290 tons of aid transported to provide urgent humanitarian needs to people affected by explosion

JEDDAH: Aid continues to flow into the Lebanese capital Beirut, as the fourth Saudi air bridge plane operated by the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) arrived on Sunday.
Ninety tons of emergency aid was flown in on the flight, including medical materials and equipment, foodstuff and shelter supplies. Medicines, burn treatments, medical solutions, masks, gloves, sterilizers and other surgical materials will be distributed by special teams on the ground.
The plane also carried food baskets that included flour and dates as well as shelter materials such as tents, blankets, mattresses, and utensils.
So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.
This aid was provided based on an assessment report of the necessary humanitarian needs resulting from the explosion, in coordination with the Saudi Embassy in Beirut, and the KSRelief branch in Lebanon.
This comes as an extension of the efforts made by Saudi Arabia to show solidarity with the Lebanese people and to provide relief to those affected by the disaster.

FASTFACT

So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port on Sunday, covering 500 families.
Saudi Ambassador to Lebanon Waleed bin Abdullah Bukhari told Arab News that special committees would oversee and review reports on the Lebanese people’s needs.
“Aid will continue to flow into Lebanon after assessing the required needs of the Lebanese people in cooperation with the relevant authorities in Lebanon,” he said.
Countries around the world have come together to help Lebanon in the wake of the explosion on Aug. 4, which devastated large areas of Beirut, damaging and destroying infrastructure, buildings and homes, including all port facilities and the country’s grain storage silos.