Palestinian woman killed in West Bank as Israelis, Palestinians clash

A Palestinian demonstrator uses a sling to hurl stones at Israeli troops during a protest against Jewish settlements and Israel’s plan to annex parts of the occupied West Bank, near Ramallah August 7, 2020. (Reuters/Mohamad Torokman)
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Updated 07 August 2020

Palestinian woman killed in West Bank as Israelis, Palestinians clash

  • The woman’s family said she was shot while trying to close the window to her house in the town of Jenin because of tear gas outside
  • Local residents said Palestinians had not used guns

JENIN, West Bank: A Palestinian women was shot dead in the West Bank where Israeli soldiers clashed with Palestinians on Friday, Palestinian medical officials said.
Palestinian officials said Israeli troops had shot the 23-year-old.
The woman’s family said she was shot while trying to close the window to her house in the town of Jenin because of tear gas outside.
An Israeli army spokesman said a riot erupted while troops were operating in Jenin.
“Palestinians fired live fire, hurled rocks and explosive devices toward the troops. The troops responded with riot dispersal means,” the spokesman said, denying that the soldiers had used live ammunition.
Local residents said Palestinians had not used guns. They said people were throwing stones at Israeli forces that raided the area.


Israeli cabinet tightens coronavirus lockdown as infections climb

Updated 15 min 38 sec ago

Israeli cabinet tightens coronavirus lockdown as infections climb

  • Since the outbreak began, 1,316 people have died in Israel and some 200,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported
  • The current second wave of infections followed an easing in May of a lockdown imposed in March

JERUSALEM: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's cabinet decided on Thursday to tighten Israel's coronavirus lockdown after he voiced alarm that a surge in infections was pushing the nation to "the edge of the abyss".
Israel went back into lockdown, its second during the pandemic, on Sept. 18. But over the past week, the number of daily new cases has reached nearly 7,000 among a population of 9 million, severely straining the resources of some hospitals.
"We reached a decision to pull the handbrake," Deputy Health Minister Yoav Kisch said on Israel Radio about the cabinet decision, without giving precise details of the restrictions.
Israel Radio and several Israeli news sites said the revised edicts, due to take effect on Friday pending parliamentary ratification, will allow fewer businesses to operate, and only in "essential" sectors such as finance, energy, health, technology, agriculture and food sales and production.
The current 1,000-metre (0.6-mile)- limit on travel from home, except for activities such as grocery and medicine shopping and commuting to work, will now also apply to attendance at street protests, the news reports said.
The revised edict was likely to put a damper on demonstrations outside Netanyahu's Jerusalem residence, where protesters, many of them from outside the city, have been calling for his resignation over alleged corruption.
He has denied charges of bribery, fraud and breach of trust in a trial that resumes in January, and rejected allegations from protest activists that a tougher lockdown was essentially aimed at quashing the demonstrations against him.
"In the past two days, we heard from the experts that if we don't take immediate and difficult steps, we will reach the edge of the abyss," Netanyahu said in public remarks to the cabinet, which met for about eight hours.
Schools will remain closed, but the cabinet decided against shuttering synagogues on Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, next week, media reported. The number of worshippers, however, will be limited.
Infection rates in close-quarter ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighbourhoods and towns in Israel have been high, but religious parties in the coalition government had opposed shuttering synagogues.
Since the outbreak began, 1,316 people have died in Israel and some 200,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported.
The current second wave of infections followed an easing in May of a lockdown imposed in March.