ThePlace: Murabba Palace in Riyadh where King Abdul Aziz used to receive kings and heads of state

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Updated 19 September 2020

ThePlace: Murabba Palace in Riyadh where King Abdul Aziz used to receive kings and heads of state

  • The palace was built in the traditional Najdian style, characterized by the highest levels of workmanship and design

Murabba Palace at King Abdul Aziz Historical Center in Riyadh is one of the city’s prominent historical landmarks.
The palace was built by the founder of the Kingdom King Abdul Aziz in 1937 outside the walls of the old city of Riyadh. The palace complex was built on a plot called “Murabba Al-Sufyan,” which was used for farming during the rainy season, according to the documents at the King Abdul Aziz Foundation for Research and Archives (Darah).
King Abdul Aziz used to receive kings and visiting heads of state and make historical agreements at Murabba Palace.
The palace was built in the traditional Najdian style, characterized by the highest levels of workmanship and design. The huge walls and internal and external ceilings are built with tamarisk and palm tree fronds. Stones were used in the foundations and columns, and wood was used for doors and windows.
This photograph was taken by Mohammad Abdu as part of the Colors of Saudi collection.

 


New Saudi ambassadors take their oaths before king

Updated 59 min 25 sec ago

New Saudi ambassadors take their oaths before king

  • Kingdom’s new permanent representative to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation also sworn in

NEOM: King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman observed on Tuesday as 11 new Saudi ambassadors took their oaths of office during a virtual ceremony.

They are: Saad bin Abdulrahman Al-Ammar, the Kingdom’s envoy in Greece; Azzam Al-Qain (Spain); Abdulaziz Al-Saqr (Tunisia); Abdulkhaliq bin Rashid bin Rafiah (Hungary); Amaal Al-Mouallami (Norway); Ziyad Al-Attiyah (Netherlands); Faisal Al-Ghamdi (Nigeria); Haitham Al-Maliki (Mexico); Osama Al-Ahmadi (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Jamal Al-Madani (Uganda); and Mutrik Al-Ajaleen (the Maldives).

In addition, Saleh Al-Suhaibani took his oath as the permanent Saudi representative to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.