Lebanese-Brazilian label presents new UAE-inspired collection at Arab Fashion Week

The new creations feature black and white looks embroidered with angelic white pearls. (Supplied)
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Updated 24 October 2020

Lebanese-Brazilian label presents new UAE-inspired collection at Arab Fashion Week

DUBAI: Dubai-based label AAVVA on Thursday presented its fall-winter 2020 collection, Mother of Pearls, during Arab Fashion Week (AFW), which runs virtually until Saturday.

AAVVA was founded by Lebanese and Brazilian design duo Ahmad Ammar and Vincenzo Visciglia. The ready-to-wear label has been on the market since 2011, continuously creating stylish and avant-garde silhouettes.

The brand showcased its new pieces as part of Brazil Noble, the first ever virtual fashion event that aims to bring Brazilian fashion to the world through AFW.




The brand showcased its new pieces as part of Brazil Noble, the first ever virtual fashion event that aims to bring Brazilian fashion to the world through AFW. (Supplied)

For their latest collection, the pair were inspired by the UAE’s history and success.

“We wanted to pay tribute to the country that inspired us to start and grow to where we are today, and also mix the free-spiritedness, art, and vibe of the Brazilian design,” they told Arab News.

The new creations feature black and white looks embroidered with angelic white pearls.

“We wanted to be chic, but also since our previous collection was full of color, we were in the mood for something more muted yet extremely lavish. The pearl embroidery is not like something we’ve done before, intricate, full, and yet simplistic in essence,” they said.




For their latest collection, the pair were inspired by the UAE’s history and success. (Supplied)

The designers said the collection was “empowering and unique” because they “placed importance on volume and movement to enhance the female silhouette, a signature of our design element.”

Has the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic affected AAVVA’s design process? Yes, is the answer.

“We think the pandemic has affected everyone and all walks of life,” they said. “We were blessed to be in the UAE – a country that is so involved in the welfare of its people. The country took amazing measures to protect its people. While the world around us shut down, we were still able to work slowly but surely amidst the lockdown.

“The measures held us back from sourcing fabrics internationally, or getting the work done on the pieces as we usually do – but we still created a collection that we are proud of and that definitely brought a smile to many faces,” they added.

They noted that since the virus outbreak, businesses and the fashion industry had become more digitalized.

“Fashion has been shot into digital space and it is proving a fascinating journey. While people in fashion are aware of what they are missing – the emotional and storytelling impact of real fashion shows – we have to adjust to the new alternatives. As they say, ‘the show must go on.’”


Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

Nutrition is the most important part when it comes to bodybuilding, then comes type of exercise, and good rest. (AFP)
Updated 29 November 2020

Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

  • Ali Al-Salam, who stopped consuming animal products in 2017, says certain steps must be completed to have an athletic body

JEDDAH: The vegan diet has risen in popularity in Saudi Arabia in recent years and has been a constant topic of debate among Saudis, attracting the interest of many, including athletes.

Ongoing debates about whether the vegan diet is sufficient for normal people, let alone bodybuilders, abound, but one Saudi is answering them physically.
Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.
Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease, but other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.
Speaking to Arab News, 33-year-old Saudi vegan bodybuilder, Ali Al-Salam, who first started his vegan diet three years ago when he was suffering from high blood pressure, highlighted that the consumption of animal products is a deep rooted idea among bodybuilders and athletes.
“We always hear that in order to build muscle, we must consume animal products. In some parts of the world, there are people who can only have a small amount of animal products yet they live their lives healthily and comfortably and are not suffering from malnutrition — on the contrary, they have a lower level of chronic illnesses.”

When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.

Ali Al-Salam, Saudi vegan bodybuilder

He said it also opened his eyes to what goes on in the dairy and meat industry; he began researching in 2016 and decided to become vegan in 2017.
“I was just like every other athlete, I used to consume a high amounts of protein. I remember in the last days before turning vegan, I used to have 10 egg whites and a piece of steak for breakfast to fulfil my protein needs. This made me think, ‘is this the only way to consume protein?’ And from then on, I started researching and got introduced to the vegan diet at a larger scale,” he said.
“When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.”
He explained that bodybuilding does not solely rely on protein, and that there are steps that must be completed in order to reach an athletic body. Nutrition is the most important part, then comes type of exercise, and good rest.
“When we talk about good nutrition, it does not just rely on protein. Yes, it is important, but the amount of calories in general is more important,” he said.
“Let’s say you needed 200 grams of protein, does that mean if you consumed 200 grams of it, you would gain muscle? No. You need all the basic nutrients to reach a certain amount of calories in general,” he added.
He highlighted that as soon as people register for gym memberships, they immediately look for supplements because they think they cannot reach the needed amount of protein.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.

• Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease.

• But other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.

• Vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants.

• Animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.

“I’m talking about non-vegans here too, where their protein intake is already high. Marketing plays a big role here. People link protein to animal products because our society grew up with this idea as well.
“Can a vegan build muscle? Yes, when they eat right, exercise correctly and rest well. The misconception about protein stems from amino acids. People think vegan food lacks amino acids, and only animal products are full of them and that is far from the truth,” he added.
When comparing vegan athletes to regular athletes, he said vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants which helps greatly in recovery, and because “animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.”