US tops 90,000 coronavirus cases in 24 hours for first time

People stand in line outside of CityMd for Covid-19 testing on October 29, 2020 in New York City. (David Dee Delgado/Getty Images/AFP)
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Updated 30 October 2020

US tops 90,000 coronavirus cases in 24 hours for first time

  • The US has the most number of coronavirus cases, tallying 8.94 million since the beginning of the pandemic

WASHINGTON: The United States notched a record number of new coronavirus cases on Thursday, for the first time topping 90,000 diagnoses in 24 hours, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.
The country, which has seen a resurgence of its Covid-19 outbreak since mid-October, recorded 91,295 new cases in the 24 hours up to 8:30 p.m. Thursday (0030 GMT Friday), according to a real-time count by the Baltimore-based school.
The US has tallied 8.94 million cases of the coronavirus since the beginning of the pandemic, the most of any country in the world.
Within the same 24-hour period, 1,021 people died from Covid-19 in the US, bringing the country’s total to 228,625 fatalities. It is the highest recorded toll in the world.
The country’s previous record of daily cases was set on Saturday, with 88,973 new infections.
The virus is currently spreading most rampantly in the Midwest.
With five days to go until the election, Democrat Joe Biden has made Donald Trump’s handling of the health crisis his main attack point against the president.

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Scotland leader ‘never been more certain’ of independence

Updated 28 November 2020

Scotland leader ‘never been more certain’ of independence

  • The head of Scotland’s devolved government and the leader of the pro-independence SNP told supporters at the party’s virtual conference

GLASGOW: Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon on Saturday said she had “never been more certain” of achieving independence, with Britain’s final departure from EU trading arrangements set to precede key Scottish elections in the months ahead.

The head of Scotland’s devolved government and the leader of the pro-independence SNP told supporters at the party’s virtual conference that the prospect of a break between Scotland and the rest of the UK has never been closer.

“Independence is in clear sight — and with unity of purpose, humility and hard work I have never been so certain that we will deliver it,” she said.

Sturgeon and the SNP have argued for a second referendum on Scottish independence since the party’s overwhelming victory among Scottish seats in Britain’s 2019 general election.

Now she hopes that a further resounding win in May elections to the Edinburgh parliament will hand her party a mandate for a second bid to quit the UK.

Opinion polls in recent months have shown that a majority of public opinion in Scotland now supports independence.

The country chose to remain part of the four-nation United Kingdom in a 2014 referendum on the issue.

But Scots later voted by a thumping majority in 2016 to remain in the European Union, a referendum the Leave side won by a narrow margin when taking the rest of Britain into account.

Since then, “we have won a landslide victory in a UK general election and support for independence has risen, it has become the sustained and majority view in public opinion this year,” said Sturgeon.

“Who should be taking the decisions that shape our futures? We know that it is the people who live here, wherever they come from, who can best harness Scotland’s immense human and natural resources.

“Let us reach out to all Scotland like never before,” she added.

Sturgeon urged her party to “demonstrate ... that Scotland is ready to take our place in the global family of independent nations,” saying it was “now a nation on the brink of making history.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has repeatedly rebuffed calls from for a another referendum, saying that the 2014 vote settled the question for a generation.

Earlier this month, Scottish independence campaigners seized on comments by the prime minister in which he said the creation of a devolved parliament in Edinburgh had been “a disaster.”

In response Sturgeon said the only way to protect the parliament was “with independence.”

On Thursday, she said a referendum could be held “in the earlier part” of the next parliamentary session.

“The people of Scotland have the right to choose their future. Let’s now focus all our efforts on making sure we bring about that better country they and future generations deserve,” Sturgeon said on Saturday.