Egypt unveils latest archaeological finds

Egypt unveils latest archaeological finds
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The sealed wooden coffins belong to top officials of the Late Period and the Ptolemaic period of ancient Egypt. (AP)
Egypt unveils latest archaeological finds
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Journalists gather around an ancient sarcophagus more than 2,500 years old and Mostafa Waziri, the secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, center, in Saqqara, Giza, Egypt. (AP)
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Updated 16 November 2020

Egypt unveils latest archaeological finds

Egypt unveils latest archaeological finds
  • Sealed wooden coffins belong to top officials of the Late Period and the Ptolemaic period of ancient Egypt
  • Egypt the hopes archaeological discoveries will spur tourism

SAQQARA, Egypt: Egypt has announced the discovery of an ancient treasure trove of more than 100 intact sarcophagi, dating back more than 2,500 years ago, the largest such find this year.
The sealed wooden coffins, unveiled on site amid much fanfare, belonged to top officials of the Late Period and the Ptolemaic period of ancient Egypt.
They were found in three burial shafts at depths of 12 meters in the sweeping Saqqara necropolis south of Cairo.
Archaeologists opened one coffin to reveal a mummy wrapped in a burial shroud adorned with brightly colored hieroglyphic pictorials.
Saqqara, home to more than a dozen pyramids, ancient monasteries, and animals burial sites, is a vast necropolis of the ancient Egyptian capital of Memphis, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
“Saqqara has yet to reveal all of its contents. It is a treasure,” Antiquities and Tourism Minister Khaled Al-Anani said at the unveiling ceremony.
“Excavations are still underway. Whenever we empty a burial shaft of sarcophagi, we find an entrance to another.”
The latest find came just over a month after archaeologists in the area found 59 other well-preserved and sealed wooden coffins, also dating back more than 2,500 years ago.
More than 40 statues of ancient deities and funerary masks were also discovered, the minister said.
Another two wooden statues were found in the tomb belonging to an ancient judge of the 6th dynasty, according to Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities.
It was not immediately clear if the statues depicted any of the judge’s family members but one statue is believed to depict an individual, by the name Heteb Ka, who was “venerated by the king,” Waziri said.
“The beauty of the statue ... is seen in the intricacy of its eyebrows, moustache, and eyelashes. It is absolutely beautiful and wonderful,” he added.
The sarcophagi will be distributed among several museums in Egypt including the yet-to-opened Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) at the Giza plateau.
Situated near the famed Giza pyramids, GEM is planned to be inaugurated in 2021 after multiple delays.
Anani attributed the flurry of discoveries in Saqqara to extensive excavation works in recent years.
Another discovery in the vast Saqqara necropolis is expected to be announced in December or early 2021.
Archaeologists also hope to find an ancient workshop for manufacturing wooden coffins for mummies.
Waziri explained that ancient Egyptians used to buy their coffins at this workshop.
“We expect it to be somewhere close to the coffin’s burial shafts,” Waziri said.
Egypt hopes archaeological discoveries will spur tourism, a sector which has suffered multiple shocks ever since a 2011 uprising up until today’s coronavirus pandemic.


‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
Updated 03 December 2020

‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
  • The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region

LONDON: A politician named after Nazi leader Adolf Hitler has won a regional election in Namibia.

The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region, with 1,196 votes over his opponent’s 213.

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology and entered politics originally to fight apartheid in southern Africa.

“That I have this name doesn’t mean that I want to subjugate Oshana now. It doesn’t mean that I’m striving for world domination. My father named me after this man. He probably didn’t understand what Adolf Hitler stood for,” the region’s new district administrator said.

“It was a completely normal name for me as a child. It wasn’t until I was growing up that I realized that this man wanted to subjugate the whole world. I have nothing to do with any of these things.”

According to media reports, his wife calls him Adolf and he usually appears in public as Adolf Uunona, leaving out the “Hitler.” But he said it was too late to change his name or update the ballot, adding: “It’s on all the official documents.”

Adolf, or Adolph, is not an uncommon name in the former German colony of Namibia, however most of those still alive with the name were alive before the Second World War.

Namibia still has communities of German-speaking people and is visited by 120,000 Germans each year.

There are German-language newspapers, radio stations, road names, place names and a small German-speaking minority.