Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love

Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love
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Three Emiratis broke four world records as part of the annual Guinness World Records (GWR) Day which was celebrated globally on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (Supplied)
Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love
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Three Emiratis broke four world records as part of the annual Guinness World Records (GWR) Day which was celebrated globally on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (Supplied)
Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love
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Three Emiratis broke four world records as part of the annual Guinness World Records (GWR) Day which was celebrated globally on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (Supplied)
Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love
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Three Emiratis broke four world records as part of the annual Guinness World Records (GWR) Day which was celebrated globally on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (Supplied)
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Updated 19 November 2020

Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love

Emiratis claim four Guinness world records with feats of skill, daring — and love

LONDON: Three Emiratis broke four world records as part of the annual Guinness World Records (GWR) Day which was celebrated globally on Wednesday, Nov. 18.

Omeir Saeed broke two world records — for furthest wakeboard ramp jump by a male and the most wakeboard rail airs in 30 seconds — while Dr. Khawla Al-Romaithi claimed the world record for the fastest time to travel to all seven continents, a feat he achieved in three days, 14 hours, 46 minutes and 48 seconds.

 

Meera Al-Hosani made the “largest sock word” by shaping the garments into the word “Happiness” in Arabic, breaking the current record while also raising awareness about inclusivity for people with Down’s syndrome in the UAE.

Saeed, 23, achieved an impressive 21-meter jump, smashing the previous record of 15 meters held by Jerome Macquart of France since 2004, as well as landing 10 rail airs in 30 seconds — double Macquart’s record of five set in 2005.

“If there is one thing I learned from this experience, it is that we hold a big responsibility to inspire the younger generation, to transfer the message and share the passion. Having this global recognition makes me proud as an Emirati. This is certainly the jewel in the crown of so many years of achievement and success,” Saeed said.

Al-Romaithi’s record-breaking time traveling to all seven continents beat the previous mark set by Kasey Stewart and Julie Berry from the US in December 2017 which stood at three days, 20 hours, 4 minutes and 19 seconds.

“To travel the world at a time when almost the whole globe is in lockdown is challenging, but to be the fastest to do it is even more challenging,” she said. “Since I started my trip in February 2020, the whole world has changed, and I think it makes this achievement even more worthy. Being an Emirati mom with all this makes me the proudest ever.”

Al-Hosani said that “love for my little Latifa” inspired her to write the word “Happiness” in Arabic using 1,447 socks.

“This was a great way to help raise awareness about these amazing, cheerful individuals,” Al-Hosani said. “I have been blessed with Latifa, who spreads joy everywhere she goes. I cannot be more thankful to be recognized as a Guinness World Records title holder, and contribute to sending this message of hope from the UAE.”

More than 50 countries took part in the GWR Day. Among those attempting to create world records was Deena Shipwright in Bahrain who was hoping to take the highest number of football penalties in a 24-hour period.

Other stories from around the world:

* In China, 105-year-old Yu Te-Hsin took on the challenge of oldest male to tandem paraglide.

* Japanese pair Hijiki Ikuyama and Angora Soncho will combine in an attempt for the most alternate skips by a pair in 30 seconds. With 60 skips to beat in the timeframe, the pair from Tokyo were determined to set themselves a goal, keep fit and achieve something special during what they called a “difficult year.”

* In the UK, Londoner Tinuke O’Yediran, a professional roller-skater and circus performer, is attempting two records — most cartwheels on roller skates in one minute and most 360 spins on e-skates in one minute.

* In the the US, sports and entertainment titans the Harlem Globetrotters have spent much of their year at home after tours and shows were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. With months to practice and hone skills, they are attempting the furthest behind-the-back basketball shot, highest throw and catch of a spinning basketball and most bounced basketball figure-eight moves in one minute.


‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
Updated 03 December 2020

‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
  • The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region

LONDON: A politician named after Nazi leader Adolf Hitler has won a regional election in Namibia.

The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region, with 1,196 votes over his opponent’s 213.

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology and entered politics originally to fight apartheid in southern Africa.

“That I have this name doesn’t mean that I want to subjugate Oshana now. It doesn’t mean that I’m striving for world domination. My father named me after this man. He probably didn’t understand what Adolf Hitler stood for,” the region’s new district administrator said.

“It was a completely normal name for me as a child. It wasn’t until I was growing up that I realized that this man wanted to subjugate the whole world. I have nothing to do with any of these things.”

According to media reports, his wife calls him Adolf and he usually appears in public as Adolf Uunona, leaving out the “Hitler.” But he said it was too late to change his name or update the ballot, adding: “It’s on all the official documents.”

Adolf, or Adolph, is not an uncommon name in the former German colony of Namibia, however most of those still alive with the name were alive before the Second World War.

Namibia still has communities of German-speaking people and is visited by 120,000 Germans each year.

There are German-language newspapers, radio stations, road names, place names and a small German-speaking minority.