Palestinian girls compete in a rare Gaza boxing contest

Palestinian girls compete in a rare Gaza boxing contest
1 / 2
A Palestinian girl takes part in a rare boxing championship in Gaza City November 20, 2020. (Reuters)
Palestinian girls compete in a rare Gaza boxing contest
2 / 2
Palestinian girls take part in a rare boxing championship in Gaza City November 20, 2020. (Reuters)
Short Url
Updated 20 November 2020

Palestinian girls compete in a rare Gaza boxing contest

Palestinian girls compete in a rare Gaza boxing contest
  • One boxer, Hala Ayoub, said she hoped the contest would show people that boxing is not only a man’s sport
  • “My ambition is to become a famous boxer and to raise the flag of Palestine,” said Ayoub

GAZA: Trading jabs and punches, young Palestinian girls competed in a female boxing tournament on Friday in the Gaza Strip, where the sport is mostly popular with men.
Friday’s contest featured female boxers as young as seven years old, and was attended by dozens of spectators.
One boxer, Hala Ayoub, said she hoped the contest would show people that boxing is not only a man’s sport.
“My ambition is to become a famous boxer and to raise the flag of Palestine and fight in local and international contests,” said Ayoub, 15.
“It (boxing) taught me how to defend myself, and how to release bad energy,” she said.
The number of female boxers in Gaza has doubled in the past six months since an initial 18-member all-girl team was formed. It now has 45 athletes, according to captain Osama Ayob.
Ali Abdel-Shafi, deputy chairman of the Palestinian Boxing Federation, said some of the girls from Friday’s competition would be selected to join the Palestinians’ boxing team and take part in a competition in Kuwait in February.
“This is the first championship I’ve taken part in...There is tension because of the audience and the noise but I am excited as well,” said Malak Mesleh, 15.
Women make up half of the Gaza Strip’s two million people.
Citing security concerns with Gaza’s ruling group Hamas, Israel and Egypt have long maintained border restrictions.


FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

Updated 03 December 2020

FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix
  • The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Romain Grosjean’s life

SAKHIR, Bahrain: Motor racing chiefs announced on Thursday the launch of an investigation into Romain Grosjean’s fiery Bahrain crash, saying the forensic probe would take “around six to eight” weeks to complete.
The French Formula One driver somehow wrenched himself free from his blazing Haas car with just burns to his hands and a broken left foot after a collision with Daniil Kvyat on the first lap of Sunday’s Grand Prix. He left hospital on Wednesday.
In the immediate aftermath of the shocking smash there was widespread praise for modern safety measures in the sport, but also concern over what F1’s motor sport managing director Ross Brawn described as “unpredictable” failures.
The International Automobile Federation (FIA) said it had “initiated a detailed analysis of Romain Grosjean’s accident at the 2020 Bahrain Grand Prix.”
The FIA’s safety director, Adam Baker, said: “With so much data available in Formula 1, it allows us to accurately determine every element of what occurred and this work has already begun.
“We take this research very seriously and will follow a rigorous process to find out exactly what happened before proposing potential improvements.”
The FIA probe will look at a range of factors including Grosjean’s helmet, safety harness, headrest, in-car extinguisher and the Halo cockpit protection.
The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Grosjean’s life as his car was sliced in two after careering into a barrier.
“The ‘halo’ saved the day and it saved Romain,” Brawn said on Sunday.
“There was controversy in developing it initially, but there can’t be any doubt now, so hats off to those who pushed for the introduction.”
But he added: “The fire is worrying. The split in the barrier is worrying and the barrier coming apart, but we can be happy with the safety of the car – that got us through today, but things failed in an unpredictable way.
“We haven’t seen anything like that for a very long time, but the barrier splitting normally results in a fatality.”
At the circuit new safety measures have been introduced to reduce the risk of a repeat crash at this Sunday’s Sakhir Grand Prix.
Two rows of tires wrapped in a conveyor belt have been installed in front of a reconstructed guardrail at the exit of Turn Three.
Several drivers expressed serious concerns at the failure of the barrier and the manner in which it was punctured.
In other changes to the circuit, where this weekend’s Grand Prix will be using the shorter “outer loop’, a kerb has been removed at Turn Nine – which was used as Turn 13 last Sunday – and a tire barrier in the approach to that corner has been extended and enlarged to four rows in depth.
Grosjean left hospital on Wednesday and in an Instagram post he highlighted the professionalism of a marshal with an extinguisher and the FIA doctor in the following Safety Car, who was on the scene very quickly.
“I told him he was a hero,” said Grosjean.
“He went into the fire as much as he could to save me. I felt Ian’s hands pulling me over the barrier and I knew I was safe... life will never be the same again.”
Grosjean is resting and healing from burns at a hotel in Abu Dhabi where he hopes he will be fit enough to race in the season-closing race next weekend.