Dr. Nasser Al-Dawood, undersecretary of the Saudi Ministry of Interior

Dr. Nasser Al-Dawood, undersecretary of the Saudi Ministry of Interior
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Updated 25 November 2020

Dr. Nasser Al-Dawood, undersecretary of the Saudi Ministry of Interior

Dr. Nasser Al-Dawood, undersecretary of the Saudi Ministry of Interior

Dr. Nasser bin Abdul Aziz Al-Dawood has been the undersecretary of the Ministry of Interior at the rank of minister since 2018.
On Saturday, Al-Dawood handed out prizes to 20 winners of the Absherthon incubator challenge which aims to encourage creativity and enhance the ministry’s e-services.
He joined the faculty of Shariah at Imam Muhammad bin Saud Islamic University and gained a bachelor’s degree in 1976-1977. He became a lecturer in the university’s faculty of social sciences in 1978.
Al-Dawood then went to the US and obtained a master’s degree and doctorate in education curriculum and teaching methods from the University of Northern Colorado.
After gaining his doctorate, he served as an assistant professor in the department of education at the faculty of social sciences at Imam Muhammad bin Saud Islamic University in 1983.
The following year, he became an associate professor in the department of education and was dean of the university’s faculty of social sciences in 1988.
Al-Dawood became director general of education in Riyadh in December 1991, serving in the role until August 1993.
He has been undersecretary of Riyadh since 2005 and was appointed as undersecretary of the Ministry of Interior in June 2018 while serving as a member of the Shoura Council.
King Salman issued a royal decree to appoint Al-Dawood as an adviser to the royal court.
He was also given the job of overseeing the celebrations for the 100th anniversary of the Kingdom’s founding, in the position of a secretary-general to the acting committee.
Al-Dawood has taken part in a number of conferences and events inside and outside of Saudi Arabia and has had research and study papers published in a range of scientific journals.


Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details. (shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2021

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
  • The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers

JEDDAH: Fraudsters have developed a new scam, contacting residents in Saudi Arabia and pretending to be bank staffers requesting customer details.
A number of Arab News staff have received such calls in recent weeks. One caller spoke Urdu while two other callers posing as senior officials from the headquarters of the bank spoke in English and Arabic with a local accent.
They used phone numbers that appeared to be local numbers but upon calling back, the lines failed to connect.
The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.
Speaking to Arab News, Talat Zaki Hafiz, secretary-general of the Media and Banking Awareness Committee of Saudi banks, said: “Saudi banks represented by the Media and Banking Awareness Committee have repeatedly warned bank customers not to react to stray phone calls of any kind coming from unknown sources that ask to update their banking record or personal information.” He further confirmed that banks do not request such information through phone calls or SMS messages.
Mohammed Khurram Khan, a professor of cybersecurity at the King Saud University in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Phishing, an online scam which targets users through emails where individuals are encouraged to click on a link that takes them to fraudulent sites, was troubling people. Now it’s a different kind of scam known as ‘vishing,’ over-the-phone phishing, where scammers persuade users to share their banking information by impersonating a bank official.”

HIGHLIGHT

The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.

Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details.
Sharing his experience Zafar Hasan, an e-learning consultant in Riyadh, said: “I received a call from someone on an unknown mobile number who introduced himself as a bank employee and told me that my ATM card was going to be blocked. It required an immediate update so I should give my Iqama number (residence permit number) and sixteen-digit ATM card number. I felt something was fishy, so I told him that I would go personally to the bank to update the card.”
The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers.
SAMA called on bank customers to take information only from the official channels of the bodies regulating the Kingdom’s financial and investment sectors and inform the competent security authorities about such fraudulent attempts.