Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19

Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19
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Cira 3, a remote-controlled robot that runs tests on suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients to limit the human exposure to the virus is seen next to a healthcare worker in a corridor of the hospital, amid a second wave of infections in Tanta, Egypt, November 18, 2020. (Reuters)
Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19
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Cira 3, a remote-controlled robot that runs tests on suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients to limit the human exposure to the virus is seen in a corridor of the hospital, amid a second wave of infections in Tanta, Egypt, November 18, 2020. (Reuters)
Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19
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Mahmoud El Komy, a 26-year-old Egyptian mechatronics engineer, stands beside Cira 3, a remote-controlled robot that runs tests on suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, to limit the human exposure to the virus, amid a second wave of infections in Tanta, Egypt, November 18, 2020. (Reuters)
Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19
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Mahmoud El Komy, a 26-year-old Egyptian mechatronics engineer, stands beside Cira 3, a remote-controlled robot that runs tests on suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, to limit the human exposure to the virus, amid a second wave of infections in Tanta, Egypt, November 18, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 25 November 2020

Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19

Egyptian inventor trials robot that can test for COVID-19
  • Cira-03 tests a patient for COVID-19 by cupping their chin and then extending an arm with a swab into their mouth
  • The creation can also take blood tests, perform echocardiograms and X-rays

TANTA: With Egypt facing a second coronavirus wave, an inventor is trialing a remote-control robot which can test for COVID-19, take the temperature of patients, and warn them if they don’t wear masks at a private hospital north of Cairo.
Mahmoud el-Komy, who designed the robot, called Cira-03, says it can help limit exposure to infection and prevent the transmission of the virus.
His creation, which has a human-like face and head and robotic arms, can take blood tests, perform echocardiograms and X-rays, and display the results to patients on a screen attached to its chest.
“I tried to make the robot seem more human, so that the patient doesn’t fear it. So they don’t feel like a box is walking in on them,” he said.
“There has been a positive response from patients. They saw the robot and weren’t afraid. On the contrary, there is more trust in this because the robot is more precise than humans.”
Cira-03 tests a patient for coronavirus by cupping their chin and then extending an arm with a swab into their mouth.
Abu Bakr El-Mihi, head of a private hospital where the robot is being tested, said they were using the robot to take the temperature of anyone suspected of having COVID-19.


UK initiative returns with MENA art in focus

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
Updated 21 January 2021

UK initiative returns with MENA art in focus

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
  • Program will feature established artists with links to region
  • Organizers emphasize need for cultural community amid pandemic

LONDON: Artists, actors and writers from across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) will take part in the latest instalment of an initiative set up to provide a sense of cultural community during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Arab British Centre and MENA Arts UK will collaborate to deliver a series of online talks by established creators that will give the public a chance to ask them questions directly, and the creators an opportunity to reflect on their work during the pandemic.

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom.

In the following weeks, award-winning writers and actors — including BAFTA winner Amir El-Masry — will also take part in the program.

This year’s program is the second in the Hangout series, the first of which was introduced early in the pandemic in 2020.

MENA Arts UK was formed last year to celebrate Britain-based artists with a connection to the region.

“We’ve been overwhelmed by the incredible response to our launch last year, and are so excited to be partnering with the Arab British Centre,” said Laura Hanna, a member of MENA Arts UK’s steering group.

“This Takeover means we can create and open up conversations around the work of MENA+ artists for a wider audience.”

The Arab British Centre is a cultural organization that regularly hosts and takes part in events celebrating and fostering cultural connections between the UK and the Arab world.

“We are delighted to be bringing back our Friday Hangout series with our friends at MENA Arts UK,” said Amani Hassan, acting executive director of the Arab British Centre.

 

“As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to severely impact life here in the UK, creating spaces where we can come together for a moment of community, culture and creativity is as essential now as it was back in March last year.”