Pakistan to ban religious party after deadly protests nationwide

Pakistan to ban religious party after deadly protests nationwide
Short Url
Updated 15 April 2021

Pakistan to ban religious party after deadly protests nationwide

Pakistan to ban religious party after deadly protests nationwide
  • Arrest of Tehreek-e-Labaik Pakistan head sparks nationwide demonstrations

ISLAMABAD, KARACHI: The Pakistan government on Wednesday said it had sent a proposal to the federal Cabinet to impose a ban on the Tehreek-e-Labaik Pakistan (TLP) religious party for killing two policemen, attacking law enforcement forces and disrupting public life through nationwide protests.

Demonstrations erupted in major Pakistani cities and quickly turned violent after Saad Rizvi, the head of the TLP, was arrested on Monday.

Addressing a press conference, Interior Minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed said that protesters had killed two policemen and injured another 340 during violent attacks on law enforcement forces.

“We have decided to slap a ban on the TLP,” he said. “A file (for the purpose) is being dispatched to the federal Cabinet for formal approval.”

“The police personnel who were kidnapped (by the protesters) have also reached back to their respective police stations,” he said, adding that demonstrators had blocked ambulances and obstructed oxygen supply to the hospitals as a third wave of the coronavirus swept through the country.

The minister also ruled out negotiations with the protesters and said their demands would not be met.

On Sunday, a day before his arrest, TLP chief Rizvi had threatened the government with protests if it did not expel France’s envoy to Islamabad over blasphemous caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad. Rizvi had called on the government to honor what he said was a commitment made to his party in February to expel the French envoy before April 20 over the publication in France of depictions of the Prophet, which enraged Muslims around the world.

The government of Prime Minister Imran Khan said that it had only committed to debating the matter in parliament.

The interior minister congratulated law enforcement officials for clearing all blocked roads, including motorways, in eight to 10 hours.

“They (the protesters) were well prepared and wanted to reach Islamabad at any cost,” Ahmed said, adding that the government had tried its best to resolve the issue through negotiations, but failed to convince TLP leaders.

“We are banning them not for any political reason, but due to their character,” he said, adding that if the government met the TLP’s demands, it would send the world a signal that Pakistan was an “extremist state.”

Earlier in the day, the interior minister had said while chairing a meeting to review the violence: “The writ of the state must be ensured at any cost.”

Law minister and spokesperson for the Sindh government, Murtaza Waha, said that 254 people had been arrested and detained in the province since Monday.

He told Arab News: “254 have been arrested and detained whereas 15 FIRs (police reports) have been registered.”

Pakistani Taliban come out in support of TLP 

Meanwhile, the Pakistani Taliban came out in support of the TLP protesters, congratulating them for putting up resistance against security forces.

“(We) pay them (the TLP) tribute for their courage and showing the military organizations their place,” the Taliban said in a statement. “We assure them that we will make them (the government) accountable for every drop of the martyrs’ blood,” they added, referring to TLP claims that its supporters had been killed in clashes with authorities.

The Pakistani Taliban, a different entity from the Afghan Taliban and fighting to overthrow the Pakistan government, are an umbrella of the militant group Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), which has broken into many divisions.

Designated a terrorist group by the US, the TTP has been in disarray in recent years, especially after several of its top leaders were killed by US drone strikes on both sides of the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, forcing its members into shelter in Afghanistan or flee to urban Pakistan.

“We want to remind them (the TLP) that this government and security institutions are always untrustworthy, breachers of promise and liars so they should not be trusted and military effort is the only solution to this problem,” the Taliban statement said.

In a press conference on Tuesday evening, science and technology minister Chaudhry Fawad Hussain said: “No group or party must even think of dictating to the government or the state . . . If a state allows this, then it will disintegrate and there will be chaos.”

In a statement released on Tuesday afternoon, TLP told the government: “You will have to expel the French ambassador under all costs . . . The country will remain jammed until the French ambassador is expelled.”

In a separate statement, the TLP said that its protests would continue until Rizvi was released. 

 

ARMED PROTESTERS

On Tuesday, the government of Punjab said that troops of Pakistan Rangers (Punjab) were “required with immediate effect till the request of de-requisition.”

Rangers were deployed in the cities of Rahim Yar Khan, Sheikhupura, Chakwal and Gujranwala, the circular said.

Lahore police spokesperson, Rana Arif, told the daily Dawn newspaper that protesters had beaten a police constable to death in Lahore’s Shahdara area on Tuesday, as a result of which a police case had been registered against TLP leaders and supporters. Police had also registered a case against Rizvi on terrorism and other charges, Arif said.

“Over 300 policemen in Punjab, including 97 in Lahore, had sustained injuries, many of them serious, after violent protesters attacked them with clubs, bricks and firearms,” Dawn reported. “The Gujrat district police officer and Kharian deputy superintendent of police were among the injured.”

“Hundreds of protesters and policemen were injured and thousands of TLP activists and supporters were arrested and booked for attacking law enforcement personnel and blocking main roads and highways,” Dawn added, saying four people, including a policeman, had been killed.

Police said that four policemen had been shot by armed TLP protesters, and the use of firearms by demonstrators had taken law enforcement agencies by surprise.

“In Lahore alone, four policemen were shot at and injured by the armed men of the TLP in the Shahpur Kanjran area. Similarly, two police constables were shot at and injured in Faisalabad,” Dawn reported. It added: “Two video clips from Lahore in this regard showed policemen, Imran and Aslam, being rushed to a hospital with bullet wounds. In another video clip, an on-duty policeman was seen calling for help to dispatch more forces, saying they had come under armed attack by the protesters in Shahpur Kanjran.”

“The TLP armed men opened fire on the police and our four constables were injured,” Lahore DIG (operations) Sajid Kiani told reporters on Tuesday evening.

Under a standing order, he said, unarmed police had been deployed and allowed only to use anti-riot gear against protesters. “But it shocked us that the TLP men used guns against the anti-riot force,” Kiani said.

Giving one example, Kiani said that when police reached Shahpur Kanjran to clear the national highway, announcements were made in nearby mosques urging TLP followers to take on police.

“Within 10 minutes, some 200 people joined those already present and attacked police,” he said, adding that Lahore police had lodged 19 cases against protesters and cleared the areas of Shahdara, Imamia Colony, Thokar Niaz Baig, Babu Sabu and some parts of Ring Road by Tuesday evening.

Police also conducted an operation in the Chungi Amar Sidhu area to rescue Model Town SP (operations) Dost Mohammad Khosa and five other policemen from protesters holding them hostage at a power grid station.

The Shahdara and Thokar areas of Lahore also turned into battlefields after hundreds of TLP supporters took several policemen hostage.

In Shahdara, a constable died from head and chest injuries after protesters tortured him with clubs, police said.

Police said that TLP activists had occupied and blocked 22 main roads, intersections and areas of Lahore, while reports of violence had also come from Faisalabad, Sheikhupura, Rahim Yar Khan, Sahiwal and Gujrat.

Reports from other parts of Punjab suggested TLP supporters had occupied more than 100 points, roads and major intersections of various cities of the province.

More than 1,400 activists of the TLP have been arrested across Punjab, a Punjab police spokesperson told Dawn, saying police had launched major operations, cleared nearly 60 roads and areas, and registered multiple police cases against supporters, representatives and leaders of the TLP.

Speaking to Arab News, Muhammad Ali, a TLP spokesperson in Karachi, said that at least six workers of the party had died and a large number were wounded after being fired on by law enforcement agencies. Hospital and rescue sources only confirmed two deaths.

In a statement released on Tuesday, the TLP said seven of its supporters had been killed by police, but the figures could not be independently verified.

HISTORY OF PROTESTS 

Saad Rizvi became the leader of the Tehreek-e-Labiak Pakistan party in November last year after the sudden death of his father, Khadim Hussein Rizvi.

Tehreek-e-Labiak and other religious parties have denounced French President Emmanuel Macron since October last year, saying he tried to defend caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad as freedom of expression.

Macron’s comments came after a young Muslim beheaded a French school teacher who had shown caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in class. The images had been republished by the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo to mark the opening of the trial over the deadly 2015 attack against the publication for the original caricatures. That enraged many Muslims in Pakistan and elsewhere who believe the depictions are blasphemous.

Rizvi’s party gained prominence in Pakistan’s 2018 federal elections, campaigning to defend the country’s blasphemy law, which calls for the death penalty for anyone who insults Islam. It also has a history of staging protests and sit-ins to pressure the government to accept its demands.

In November 2017, Rizvi’s followers staged a 21-day protest and sit-in after a reference to the sanctity of the Prophet Muhammad was removed from the text of a government form.


Nurse who helped saved Boris Johnson’s life quits in protest

Nurse who helped saved Boris Johnson’s life quits in protest
A file photo shows (L-R) St Thomas Hospital Director of Infection and consultant Dr Nick Price, Britain's PM Boris Johnson and Ward Sister Jenny McGee sharing a joke as the PM talks to the NHS staff in central London on July 5, 2020. (AFP)
Updated 19 May 2021

Nurse who helped saved Boris Johnson’s life quits in protest

Nurse who helped saved Boris Johnson’s life quits in protest
  • She refused to take part in a Downing Street photo opportunity last July, noting: “Lots of nurses felt that the government hadn’t led very effectively, the indecisiveness, so many mixed messages

LONDON: A nurse credited with helping to save Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s life last year has quit the UK health service in protest at the government’s lack of “respect” for frontline staff.
New Zealand-born Jenny McGee was one of two intensive-care nurses who gave Johnson round-the-clock treatment a year ago in a central London hospital when he was struck down with Covid-19.
The prime minister said later that he only pulled through thanks to their care, but his government has since faced fury from nurses for offering a pay rise of just one percent — effectively a cut, after inflation.
“We’re not getting the respect and now pay that we deserve. I’m just sick of it. So I’ve handed in my resignation,” McGee says in a Channel 4 television documentary airing next Monday.
She refused to take part in a Downing Street photo opportunity last July, noting: “Lots of nurses felt that the government hadn’t led very effectively, the indecisiveness, so many mixed messages. “It was just very upsetting.”
Keir Starmer, leader of the main opposition Labour party, said McGee’s resignation was a “devastating indictment of Boris Johnson’s approach to the people who put their lives on the line for him and our whole country.”
But a Downing Street spokesperson said “this government will do everything in our power to support” staff of the National Health Service (NHS), stressing they had been excluded from a pay freeze affecting other public sector workers.
In the documentary, McGee says it was “surreal” seeing the prime minister in her hospital. “All around him there was lots and lots of sick patients, some of whom were dying,” she recalled. “I remember seeing him and thinking he looked very, very unwell. He was a different color really.
“They are very complicated patients to look after and we just didn’t know what was going to happen.”
A worse wave of the pandemic hit Britain in the winter months, and McGee said the situation on her wards leading up to Christmas “was just a cesspool of Covid.”
“At that point, I don’t know how to describe the horrendousness of what we were going through,” she said.
In a statement Tuesday, McGee said she plans to take up a new nursing job in the Caribbean, but hopes to return to the NHS in the future.


US condemns Erdogan 'anti-Semitic' remarks

US condemns Erdogan 'anti-Semitic' remarks
Updated 19 May 2021

US condemns Erdogan 'anti-Semitic' remarks

US condemns Erdogan 'anti-Semitic' remarks
  • The latest episodes are likely to sour further the relationship between Turkey and the United States

WASHINGTON: The United States on Tuesday sharply criticized Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for what it called "anti-Semitic" remarks amid his denunciations of Israel's strikes in Gaza.
"The United States strongly condemns President Erdogan's recent anti-Semitic comments regarding the Jewish people and finds them reprehensible," State Department spokesman Ned Price said in a statement.
"We urge President Erdogan and other Turkish leaders to refrain from incendiary remarks, which could incite further violence," he said.
Erdogan, whose political roots are in Islamism, has championed the Palestinian cause during his 18-year rule even though Turkey remains one of the few Muslim-majority nations with relations with Israel.
He has accused Israel of "terrorism" against the Palestinians and recently said, "It is in their nature."
"They are murderers, to the point that they kill children who are five or six years old. They only are satisfied by sucking their blood," he said.
Erdogan also lashed out at US President Joe Biden for his diplomatic support to Israel, saying the US leader has "bloody hands."
The latest episodes are likely to sour further the relationship between Turkey and the United States.
Biden took office vowing a harder line on Erdogan, whom he has described as an autocrat, and last month took the landmark step of recognizing the mass killings of Armenians by the waning Ottoman Empire in 1915-17 as genocide.
Biden and Erdogan nonetheless had agreed to hold a first meeting on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Brussels next month.


Indonesia’s COVID-19 vaccine drive gets a shot in the arm with private sector plan

Indonesia’s COVID-19 vaccine drive gets a shot in the arm with private sector plan
Indonesia aims to vaccinate 181.5 million people or 70 percent of its 270 million population to develop herd immunity by the end of 2021. (AFP)
Updated 19 May 2021

Indonesia’s COVID-19 vaccine drive gets a shot in the arm with private sector plan

Indonesia’s COVID-19 vaccine drive gets a shot in the arm with private sector plan
  • President wants to accelerate efforts to reach herd immunity by year-end

JAKARTA: Private sector companies in Indonesia on Tuesday began inoculating employees against COVID-19 with a paid-for vaccine plan aimed at boosting productivity and accelerating the government’s free, nationwide vaccination drive.

The plan was finally rolled out four months after President Joko Widodo — in a January meeting with the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce (Kadin) — introduced the idea for the private sector to carry out and pay for its own vaccination drive, Kadin chairman Rosan Roeslani said.
“We discussed with the president on how to quickly reach herd immunity. The president came up with this idea, and the business community responded positively,” Roeslani told Arab News.
Widodo rolled out the private vaccination drive during a visit to a Unilever Indonesia plant in an industrial zone of Cikarang, West Java province.
The company began inoculating its employees along with 16 other companies and two private vaccination centers for micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) from industrial zones around Jakarta.
Unilever, and 16 other labor-intensive companies began administering the jab on Tuesday.
There are also two centers for MSMEs that do not have their own premises for carrying out vaccinations.
Roeslani said 22,736 companies had registered to inoculate more than 10 million people through the private vaccination scheme, which the chamber coordinated.
The companies registered in the program have to buy the vaccine from Kimia Farma, a subsidiary of the state-owned vaccine manufacturer Bio Farma, which the government assigned to import the vaccines for private companies.
The Health Ministry has capped the price for a single dose of China’s Sinopharm vaccine at $35, but participating companies cannot charge their employees for it.
Widodo said Indonesia had secured 420,000 Sinopharm doses out of the committed 30 million for private inoculation.
Other vaccines to be used for the private companies are China’s CanSino, while negotiations are underway for Russia’s Sputnik V.

HIGHLIGHT

The plan was finally rolled out four months after President Joko Widodo introduced the idea for the private sector to carry out and pay for its own vaccination drive.

“It is really difficult to secure vaccines nowadays, with 215 countries around the world competing to get them,” Widodo said during an exchange with vaccine recipients from other companies via video conference. “You are among the lucky ones to get the jab today. We hope by August or September, we will have inoculated 70 million people and the curve will be flattened by then so that the manufacturing plants can resume normal operations.”
Iswar Deni, the corporate secretary of garment manufacturer Pan Brothers, said the company had started to inoculate 1,000 out of 3,000 people it had registered.
“We are inoculating those at the supervisor and higher up level since they are the ones with high mobility to manage production operations, as well as those at the front line such as security personnel, internal COVID-19 task force members and labor union committee members,” he told Arab News.
Indonesia aims to vaccinate 181.5 million people or 70 percent of its 270 million population to develop herd immunity by the end of 2021.
As of Tuesday, nearly 14 million people had received their first jab, while 9.2 million have had the second dose of China’s Sinovac and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines which the government used in its national drive.
Accelerating the number of people being vaccinated is timely as Indonesia is facing the prospect of increased infections after the Eid Al-Fitr holiday, when people gathered in large numbers during the festivities and flocked to markets during the last days of Ramadan for Eid shopping.


Virus-ravaged rural Indian communities left ‘at God’s mercy’

Virus-ravaged rural Indian communities left ‘at God’s mercy’
A health worker inoculates a woman in Noida, Uttar Pradesh on Monday. (AFP)
Updated 19 May 2021

Virus-ravaged rural Indian communities left ‘at God’s mercy’

Virus-ravaged rural Indian communities left ‘at God’s mercy’
  • Officials in Basi village, in Uttar Pradesh’s worst-affected district of Baghpat, have recorded 35 deaths out of a population of 7,000 in the last month

NEW DELHI: Virus-ravaged rural communities in India’s largest and most populated state had been left “at God’s mercy” due to the collapse of the health system.
Millions of lives in Uttar Pradesh were said to be at risk following a surge in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases with some villages reporting hundreds of deaths and new infections on a daily basis.
A lack of proper medical facilities has left remote parts of the state ill-equipped to deal with the crisis as the country battles another wave of COVID-19.
In a ruling on Monday, Allahabad high court described the situation in Uttar Pradesh as “grim.”
Judges had been sitting to preside over a petition demanding better care for COVID-19 patients in the Meerut district. Petitioners had slammed India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government for “poor medical infrastructure and placing the lives of millions of people at the mercy of God.”
The court’s two-judge bench said: “If this is the state of affairs of treatment at a medical college in a city like Meerut, then the entire medical system of the state in the smaller cities and villages can only be taken to be at the mercy of God.”
Officials in Basi village, in Uttar Pradesh’s worst-affected district of Baghpat, have recorded 35 deaths out of a population of 7,000 in the last month.
“The situation is so grim that, in some houses, two or three deaths have taken place, wiping out the entire family,” Rajesh Nain, a social worker and village resident, told Arab News.
“In one house, both the father and son lost their lives in the space of two days, while in another, a middle-aged couple died in quick succession. It’s like the area has turned into a ghost village. No one comes out of the house; there is hardly any day when someone or other does not die,” he said.
On Tuesday, India logged more than 260,000 COVID-19 cases, a low figure compared to more than 400,000 last week, but the death rate remained high at in excess of 4,000 per day. Out of the national total, Uttar Pradesh reported 9,500 cases on Tuesday and 371 deaths.
However, experts and activists in rural areas disputed official figures, describing them as “under-reporting.”

BACKGROUND

Families reportedly ‘wiped out’ by COVID-19 as health system in parts of Uttar Pradesh collapses amid virus surge.

Basi’s former village leader, Satvir Pradhan, told Arab News: “The government is registering only those deaths which are happening in COVID-19 centers; they are ignoring villages where people are dying without oxygen, and hospital beds.
“There is no doctor, no medical centers, no testing. We asked the district administration to provide us with medical support, but despite assurances, no help has come,” he said.
The situation was reportedly similar in other parts of the state where more than 75 percent of its population of 200 million live in rural areas.
Devendra Dhammaa, a social activist and farmer from Basi’s neighboring village of Sankroub, told Arab News: “Villages in Uttar Pradesh are basically on their own as far as medical infrastructure is concerned.
“People have a fever; they take medicine supplied by local doctors who are mostly untrained, and then rest at home. If someone starts facing breathing problems, if he or she is lucky, they will find a doctor. Otherwise, they die,” he said.
Meanwhile, recent media reports said more than 2,000 bodies had been found “hastily buried or abandoned along the banks of Ganga (the Ganges)” in various districts of Uttar Pradesh.
In the Unnao district, a neighborhood of the state capital Lucknow, 900 bodies were recovered from riverbanks and similar instances were reported in districts including Ghaziabad, Kanpur, Ghazipur, Kannauj, and Ballia along the border with the eastern Indian state of Bihar.
Dr. Jagpal Singh Teotia, from Baghpat district, told Arab News: “What we are witnessing is an unprecedented horror and tragedy in the state. A huge part of the population has been left to fend for themselves with the government not providing any kind of support.
“An alertness on the part of the government and some focus on the health sector in the past one year could have saved many lives.”
Teotia, one of the few doctors in the area trained to treat COVID-19 patients, said several healthcare workers felt “helpless at the sight of tragedy” and blamed the government for “risking people’s lives.”
“When the government knew that the virus was spreading, what was the need to allow over 3 million people to gather at the Kumbh Mela (a large Hindu festival held in the northern Indian city of Haridwar)? What was the need to organize local body elections (in Uttar Pradesh last month) when the pandemic was at its peak?”
Arab News recently reported that more than 700 schoolteachers had died after participating in the local polls. A majority of the deaths took place in villages where medical facilities were non-existent.


London police officer under investigation for shouting ‘free Palestine’ at rally

London police officer under investigation for shouting ‘free Palestine’ at rally
Updated 18 May 2021

London police officer under investigation for shouting ‘free Palestine’ at rally

London police officer under investigation for shouting ‘free Palestine’ at rally
  • She was filmed accepting a white rose and hugging a protester amid a cheering crowd
  • It came as major cities across the UK have seen massive protests in solidarity with the Palestinian people

LONDON: London’s Metropolitan Police is investigating an on-duty officer who shouted “free Palestine” at a march condemning Israel’s bombing campaign in the Gaza Strip.

The uniformed female officer was captured on video at the demonstration in the capital. In the footage, she is seen accepting a white rose and hugging a protester.

She was heard shouting “free, free Palestine” to a cheering audience. The footage went viral on several social media sites.

It came as major cities across the UK have seen massive protests in solidarity with the Palestinian people.