Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces clash, water cannon deployed

Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces clash, water cannon deployed
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Updated 10 May 2021

Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces clash, water cannon deployed

Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces clash, water cannon deployed

Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces clash in East Jerusalem, as tensions boil over the postponement of a key court hearing on a flashpoint property dispute.

Hundreds of Palestinian protesters were wounded in clashes with Israeli security forces over the weekend, as Israel vows to restore order in Jerusalem.

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Nadal bounced by 50th-ranked Lloyd Harris in Washington

Nadal bounced by 50th-ranked Lloyd Harris in Washington
Updated 06 August 2021

Nadal bounced by 50th-ranked Lloyd Harris in Washington

Nadal bounced by 50th-ranked Lloyd Harris in Washington
  • The 24-year-old Harris is 6-foot-4 with big serves that regularly topped 120 mph and produced 16 aces on Thursday
  • Nadal lost to Novak Djokovic at the French Open finals and skipped Wimbledon and the Tokyo Olympics

WASHINGTON: The good news for Rafael Nadal was that his painful left foot felt much better Thursday at the Citi Open. The bad news? His debut appearance at the tournament ended after two rough outings.
A day after needing three sets and more than three hours to get by at the hard-court tuneup for the US Open, Nadal was eliminated 6-4, 1-6, 6-4 under the lights by 50th-ranked Lloyd Harris of South Africa.
“I need to keep working,” Nadal said.
He is a 20-time Grand Slam champion. Harris has only once made it as far as the third round at a major.
“All the credit to him that he played aggressive,” Nadal said. “He played well. He was brave.”
The 24-year-old Harris is 6-foot-4 with big serves that regularly topped 120 mph and produced 16 aces Thursday.
“His serve,” Nadal said, “was huge.”
Nadal’s, admittedly, was not. That might be a sign of rust, which would be understandable given that the 35-year-old Spaniard hadn’t competed anywhere in nearly two months — not even picking up his racket for about three weeks after a semifinal loss to Novak Djokovic at the French Open.
Nadal skipped Wimbledon and the Tokyo Olympics and certainly never quite played the way he can during his first trip to the US capital.
Thursday’s match ended when Nadal got broken for the second time, with Harris dropping his racket in disbelief after delivering a lob winner to close the proceedings.
“I played this last game really bad,” said Nadal, who was the top seed. “My serve was not working the proper way.”
This was less of a physical tug-of-war between a pair of heavy hitters than Nadal’s victory over 192nd-ranked Jack Sock on Wednesday, which was decided by a third-set tiebreaker.
About 3 1/2 hours before returning to the main stadium to face Harris, Nadal made his way to tiny Court 5 for a training session.
As fans shouted “Vamos, Rafa!” and snapped photos and video with their phones from the stands at an adjacent court, Nadal didn’t do much running. Instead, he mostly stayed in place while smacking groundstrokes, then practicing volleys, serves and returns for 45 minutes with Emilio Gomez, a 29-year-old from Ecuador who is ranked 165th and lost in the Citi Open’s first round.
Not at all taxing by Nadal’s usual exacting and exhausting standards.
And against Harris, when the points mattered, it took Nadal a bit to get going. It wasn’t really until the second set that he seemed into it, as did the fans, many of whom rose to salute when Nadal broke to lead 3-1 with a forehand passing winner.
But down the stretch in the third set, it was Nadal, surprisingly, who faltered. He now will try to regroup ahead of the US Open, which he missed last year during the pandemic but won the last time he entered, in 2019.
Harris, meanwhile, continues the pursuit of a first ATP title, which would leave him 87 behind Nadal’s total.
“To be honest, tennis-wise, I did a lot of good things,” Harris said. “I think the best thing was to stay in the moment, keep my composure.”
Next for him is a match against 2015 Citi Open champion and 2014 US Open finalist Kei Nishikori on Friday.
Other quarterfinals: Mackie McDonald vs. Denis Kudla in an all-US contest, No. 5 seed Jannik Sinner of Italy vs. Steve Johnson of the US, and No. 11 John Millman of Australia vs. Jenson Brooksby of the US
Sinner beat Sebastian Korda 7-6 (3), 7-6 (3) in a matchup between two youngsters considered possible future stars of men’s tennis who also happen to be doubles partners this week.
Sinner, 19, reached the French Open quarterfinals last year and the fourth round there this year before losing to 13-time champion Nadal each time. Korda, 21, is only the third man in the last 50 years to reach the fourth round in his debuts at both Roland Garros and Wimbledon.
They got to know each other on tour; Sinner said Korda texted him about joining up in doubles. After facing each other on a breezy, 90-degree afternoon, they reached the doubles semifinals at night by beating Nick Kyrgios and Frances Tiafoe.
Brooksby, 20, beat No. 2 seed Felix Auger-Aliassime 6-3, 6-4.
“He’s going to be dangerous in the future,” said Auger-Aliassime, a Wimbledon quarterfinalist last month.
For Nadal, the past two months were not easy.
“I had a lot of problems with my foot. I was not able to practice all the days that I really wanted, but I did as much as I could,” he said. “And I tried hard here, no?”


Ayat Dahi: Saudi jeweler from the heart of the Al-Balad alleys

Ayat Dahi: Saudi jeweler from the heart of the Al-Balad alleys
Updated 06 August 2021

Ayat Dahi: Saudi jeweler from the heart of the Al-Balad alleys

Ayat Dahi: Saudi jeweler from the heart of the Al-Balad alleys
  • Ayat Dahi opened her jewelry studio in 2020 and though the pandemic was a worldwide crisis, she remained optimistic and focused on her art
  • Ayat Studio offers weekly jewelry making and pottery workshops for beginners and advanced levels for both genders

JEDDAH: The art of jewelry design is complex and requires a keen eye for details, achieved with time and effort. What better than to bring the beauty of such art from the heart of Jeddah’s old town.

Making jewelry might seem a bit intimidating as it requires dealing with solid materials, sharp tools, and a lot of patience. But despite any difficulties, Ayat Dahi, a young Saudi Arabian artist and jeweler from Jeddah, decided to unleash her artistic skills and open her own jewelry studio. At the same time, she also wanted to educate and inspire art among the youth of her society.

Dahi received her master’s degree in jewelry making from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia in 2017. She told Arab News that her interest in the craft was already there, but working toward a degree helped her grow.

“I started making jewelry 10 years ago but I was only a beginner back then,” she said. “The real spark for making jewelry was ignited once I was back from the US.”

Dealing with craft tools, such as a torch, sandpaper, hammers, and saws require a bit of strength and confidence.

“Although the tools I am dealing with are considered dangerous and sharp, you have to be very careful and precise when dealing with them,” Dahi said. “However, the fine result will always leave me surprised and in awe.”

She participated at the annual Atlanta jewelry show in 2017.

“The exhibit gathered jewelry makers from everywhere in one place,” said Dahi, who was inspired by her love for coffee. “The pieces on display were derived from the coffee culture. I would use a coffee bean in a ring instead of a precious stone and I also had dual rings that can be worn by couples or friends.”

A woman with many talents, Dahi also works as a barista at one of Jeddah’s well-known cafes and was among the very first females to do so in the Kingdom.

She said that she always tries to incorporate new items and designs into her jewelry pieces to make them more contemporary and artsy. “Generally, I like to produce jewelry that can be worn as a jewelry item and sometimes I opt to produce art pieces with the same tools and techniques used for jewelry,” Dahi said. “However it does not matter if the piece is wearable or not. It is the process and the piece itself that ends up being beautifully made and designed.”

HIGHLIGHTS

Ayat Dahi received her master’s degree in jewelry making from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia in 2017. She told Arab News that her interest in the craft was already there, but working toward a degree helped her grow.

A woman with many talents, Dahi also works as a barista at one of Jeddah’s well-known cafes and was among the very first females to do so in the Kingdom. She said that she always tries to incorporate new items and designs into her jewelry pieces to make them more contemporary and artsy. 

Inspired by her surroundings, the jewelry designer is working on a souvenir project of a wearable jewelry collection motivated by Al-Balad’s many historic sites and architectural designs.

She further went on to explain how there are endless techniques in jewelry making. It starts with pitching an idea, researching and sketching the design, then cutting, polishing, and soldering.

“I believe having an artistic imagination for the design is one of the most valuable assets of the craft,” Dahi said. “Once I finish designing and crafting any piece, I really feel accomplished knowing that I am the one behind it.”

In 2019, Dahi earned her traditional arts diploma at Jameel House of Tradition Arts, located in the old Jeddah downtown, known as Al-Balad. It is also where her studio is located, near the Nassif House Museum, built by Omar Nassif in 1881.

“I choose to have a studio in Al-Balad because it is one of the dearest historic areas to my heart, and I believe it is a very inspiring place for so many people, too,” she said.

“I want visitors to experience the true meaning of an art workshop, and thus I chose the Al-Balad area, where they will have to walk between the old streets and alleyways to reach the studio.”

Saudi artist and jeweler Ayat Dahi at work. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)

Ayat Studio offers weekly jewelry making and pottery workshops for beginners and advanced levels for both genders. The studio also supports other artists by providing them with a space to offer workshops. Dahi also aims to exchange experiences and learn new things through these workshops.

In 2020, she decided to open her jewelry studio and though the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic was a worldwide crisis, Dahi remained optimistic and focused on her art.

“During the pandemic, I was keeping myself busy working on various things in my home studio and sharing what I accomplished through social media,” she said. “That caught people’s attention and then many were longing for a visit. After that, I decided to open a studio in the downtown area.”

Inspired by her surroundings, the jewelry designer is working on a souvenir project of a wearable jewelry collection motivated by Al-Balad’s many historic sites and architectural designs.


OIC slams attempted Houthi attack on southern Saudi city

OIC slams attempted Houthi attack on southern Saudi city
Updated 06 August 2021

OIC slams attempted Houthi attack on southern Saudi city

OIC slams attempted Houthi attack on southern Saudi city

JEDDAH: The Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on Thursday condemned the Iran-backed Houthi militia’s targeting of civilians in the Saudi city of Khamis Mushayt.

The Arab coalition said on Wednesday that a drone targeted the southern city in the Kingdom.

OIC Secretary-General Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen praised the Saudi-backed coalition and its support for Yemen’s internationally recognized government to deal with terrorism in line with international humanitarian law.

He reiterated the OIC’s solidarity and support for Saudi Arabia in all measures it takes to preserve its security, stability and the safety of its citizens and residents. 

The UAE and Bahrain also condemned and denounced the Houthi attempts to attack civilians and infrastructure.

The UAE urged the international community to take an “immediate and decisive stance” to “stop the recurrent acts,” which target vital and civilian installations and the security and stability of the Kingdom.

Bahrain also called on the international community to condemn terrorism that threatens the region.


What We Are Eating Today: Wildflour

What We Are Eating Today: Wildflour
Updated 06 August 2021

What We Are Eating Today: Wildflour

What We Are Eating Today: Wildflour

Jeddah-based bakery Wildflour offers local homemade desserts and specialized gifts for people who crave the sweet taste of brownies and cookies.

The business chooses simplicity and classic flavors to create memorable dessert foods and baked goods.

Its most popular products include chewy brownie bites with a crumble top and freshly baked bundt cakes in several flavors, including banana and chocolate, and lemon and blueberry.

The bakery uses classic white boxes and decorative wildflower varieties to package its desserts. It also offers gift options, cards and flowers. Wildflour offers catering services for large events and also hosts product giveaways.

One unique product offered by the bakery is the brownie bit mini jar, which dispenses miniature sweet snacks for people following strict diets. It is also good choice for a chocolate treat on the go.

For more information, find the bakery on the food delivery app Lugmety or directly on Instagram @wildflour.bakery.


‘Delta plus’ variant seen in South Korea ‘is not new’: Saudi expert

‘Delta plus’ variant seen in South Korea ‘is not new’: Saudi expert
Updated 06 August 2021

‘Delta plus’ variant seen in South Korea ‘is not new’: Saudi expert

‘Delta plus’ variant seen in South Korea ‘is not new’: Saudi expert
  • 102 quarantine violators arrested in Makkah region; 986 new cases reported

JEDDAH: The COVID-19 delta plus variant, detected in two South Korean cases on Tuesday, is “not new and has been detected in India for months,” a Saudi infectious disease expert has said.

“Delta plus was previously detected in the EU since March and in India for months,” said Ahmed Al-Hakawi, who is also a hospital epidemiologist in Riyadh.

South Korea reported its first two cases of the variant earlier this week, with overall COVID-19 cases in the country rising sharply.

Al-Hakawi said that the new form of COVID-19 “differs slightly from the delta variant through the presence of the K417N mutation that was previously detected in the beta mutant.”

He added that the delta plus designation has yet to be approved by medical authorities, and that there is no evidence to suggest that is is more virulent than the original delta variant.

Meanwhile, a total of 102 people in the Makkah region have been arrested for failing to adhere to quarantine regulations after testing positive for COVID-19.

The media spokesman for local police said that preliminary legal procedures were taken against the individuals and their cases were referred to the relevant authorities.

INNUMBERS

530,981 - Total coronavirus cases in Saudi Arabia

512,373 - Total number of recoveries

8,297 - Total number of deaths from COVID-19

Those breaking the Kingdom’s COVID-19 regulations could face fines of up to SR200,000 ($53,000), a maximum of two years in prison, or both. The penalty is doubled for repeated violations.

Non-Saudis found to have breached quarantine rules run the risk of being deported and permanently banned from the country.

Saudi Arabia on Thursday reported 13 more COVID-19-related deaths, bringing the Kingdom’s death toll over the course of the pandemic to 8,297.

There were 986 new cases, meaning that 530,981 people have now contracted the disease. A total of 10,311 cases remained active, of which 1,424 were in critical condition.

Of the newly recorded cases, 189 were in the Makkah region, 177 in the Riyadh region, 162 in the Eastern Province and 55 in Madinah region.

In addition, the Saudi Ministry of Health said that 1,055 patients had recovered from the disease, increasing the total number of recoveries in the Kingdom to 512,373.

The region with the highest number of recoveries was Riyadh with 262. It was followed by the Eastern Province with 194 and Makkah with 151.

Saudi Arabia has so far conducted 25,549,087 PCR tests, with 105,537 carried out in the past 24 hours.

Testing hubs and treatment centers set up throughout the country have dealt with hundreds of thousands of people since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Among them, Taakad (make sure) centers provide COVID-19 testing for those who show no or only mild symptoms or believe they have come into contact with an infected individual, while Tetamman (rest assured) clinics offer treatment and advice to those with virus symptoms such as fever, loss of taste and smell, and breathing difficulties.

Appointments for either service can be made via the ministry’s Sehhaty app.

Meanwhile, 28,829,305 people in the Kingdom have now received a COVID-19 vaccine, including 1,501,805 elderly people. About 56.35 percent of the population have received the first dose, while 26.4 percent have completed both doses. At this rate, 70 percent of the population is expected to have completed both doses by Sept. 29 this year.