UK mosque raised $1.4m for charity during Ramadan

UK mosque raised $1.4m for charity during Ramadan
Green Lane Masjid’s Humanitarian Taskforce said it was “more active than ever” during this year’s Ramadan. (@GreenLaneMasjid)
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Updated 10 June 2021

UK mosque raised $1.4m for charity during Ramadan

UK mosque raised $1.4m for charity during Ramadan
  • From Birmingham to Beirut, Green Lane Masjid is using donations made during the holy month to feed the hungry
  • The mosque has provided 30-40% more than previous years for humanitarian emergencies overseas

LONDON: A British mosque raised £996,000 ($1.4 million) for charity during Ramadan, with fundraisers providing humanitarian assistance in Yemen, Syria and Lebanon, as well as helping to feed the hungry and vulnerable in the UK.
In a statement issued to Arab News, Green Lane Masjid’s Humanitarian Taskforce said it was “more active than ever” during this year’s Ramadan.
Working with charities including Islamic Relief and One Ummah, the Birmingham-based mosque ran a series of events, TV fundraisers and food-delivery programs throughout the holy month.
As well as fasting and regular prayer, Muslims are encouraged to give generously to charitable causes during Ramadan.
In one TV fundraiser, over £130,000 was raised and pledged for Green Lane Masjid’s bread factory project in Syria.
Using this money, it will continue to bake over 11 tons of flour every day, providing regular and affordable food for 28,000 Syrians, many of whom face poverty and economic ruin.
Yemen also benefitted from the mosque’s fundraising. In one appeal hosted by a local radio station in Birmingham, the mosque raised nearly £20,000 — a sum of money earmarked for children caught up in the country’s escalating humanitarian crisis.
That money “will be used to buy peanut paste, a life-saving meal for malnourished children who are on the brink of death,” the mosque told Arab News.
“The paste is used for children who need high calorific intake to increase their weight but are unable to absorb normal food due to their critical condition.”
In Lebanon, the mosque provided thousands of hot iftar meals to refugees, many of whom would have otherwise been unable to participate in the traditional evening breaking of the fast.
“Over the past year, there has also been a conscious effort by the Taskforce to focus on UK projects too,” said Green Lane Masjid.
“Just in February, the team partnered with Islamic Relief to distribute over 2,000 meals to the homeless and vulnerable on the streets of Birmingham.”
Around 65 percent of those who were served meals were non-Muslims struggling to make ends meet due to the hardships of the coronavirus pandemic.
Nusaybah Naeem, an editor at the mosque, told Arab News that her team and the wider community rose to the challenge presented by the pandemic and its ensuing economic shock — both at home and abroad. 
“In February 2021, we saw (food bank) demand quadruple as many people had lost jobs, run out of savings, or were waiting to receive benefits. Our food bank service users are often burdened by debt and are suffering with other issues such as mental health problems or domestic violence,” she added.
“We do have a strong ethnic mix of attendees to the food bank. Many of our attendees are non-Muslims. Our services are open to all regardless of race, creed or background.” 
Further afield, “our taskforce has achieved 30-40 percent more than previous years this Ramadan for key humanitarian causes abroad,” she said.
“This is partly down to the humanitarian emergencies that have arisen with Yemen, Palestine, the Rohingyas and others. It’s also a reflection of the giving nature of our community, even in difficult times when they may be worse off themselves. Ramadan encourages people to strive harder than they may in other months.”


UK firm creates monitor that detects COVID-19 in 15 minutes

UK firm creates monitor that detects COVID-19 in 15 minutes
Updated 13 min 6 sec ago

UK firm creates monitor that detects COVID-19 in 15 minutes

UK firm creates monitor that detects COVID-19 in 15 minutes
  • Ceiling-mounted gadget 98-100% accurate after early rounds of testing
  • ‘Covid alarm’ can even detect virus in asymptomatic people

LONDON: A team of British scientists has created a monitor that can detect COVID-19 infections in a room within 15 minutes.

The ceiling-mounted “Covid alarm,” created by Cambridge-based developer Roboscientific, detects chemicals secreted by the skin or found on the breath of people with the virus called “volatile organic compounds,” which scientists at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and Durham University said creates an “odor fingerprint” that could be identified by the device with 98-100 percent accuracy.

The scientists, whose work has yet to be peer-reviewed, stressed that more studies are needed, but initial analysis from 54 samples has been enough to prompt funding interest in further testing from the UK Department of Health and Social Care.

The monitor can apparently differentiate between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases, and can even detect the virus accurately in asymptomatic people, making it even more accurate than polymerase chain reaction tests.

The breakthrough could prove invaluable in the future of testing for COVID-19, and with modification, for other diseases as well.

The device can be installed in all sorts of environments, from schools to hospitals and aircraft cabins, and can send results instantly to computers and mobile phones.

At £5,000 ($7,050) per monitor, it may also prove more economically viable than frequent disposable testing.

Prof. James Logan, head of the Department of Disease Control at LSHTM, said trials could be completed by the end of 2021.

“The fact that devices already exist that we can use will really speed this up. These results are really promising, and demonstrate the potential for using this technology as a rapid, non-invasive test with incredible accuracy,” he added.

“If these devices are successfully developed for use in public places, they could be affordably and easily scaled up.”

Roboscientific, which is also developing a handheld monitor for use on individuals and with a results turnaround time of just two minutes, first developed the technology six years ago to detect infections in farm animals.

It proved so accurate that it was able to detect single cases of salmonella or campylobacter in chicken barns of up to 50,000 birds.


Partying youths defy Paris police for third night running

Partying youths defy Paris police for third night running
Updated 13 June 2021

Partying youths defy Paris police for third night running

Partying youths defy Paris police for third night running
  • Officials have urged people to continue respecting social distancing limits as the country emerges from its third COVID-19 lockdown

PARIS: Paris police said Sunday that three people were detained after officers used tear gas to disperse hundreds of youths gathered for a street party in defiance of COVID-19 social distancing limits and an 11:00 p.m. curfew.
The so-called Project X gatherings, a reference to an American film from 2012, on the vast lawns in front of the Invalides war museum on Saturday was the third since Thursday.
Videos on social media showed largely maskless youths surrounding a car and then climbing and jumping on its roof, while others bombarded police vans with bottles.
Other parties were broken up in the Tuileries gardens near the Louvre and on the banks of the Seine River, police said, as people enjoying warm evenings outside found it difficult to respect the coronavirus curfew.
Many bars across the city remained open after 11:00 p.m. over the weekend, the first since the curfew was pushed back from 9:00 p.m. last Wednesday, according to AFP reporters.
“We had our ‘bac’ [high school exit exam] this year and we really needed to let loose,” said Cedric, 17, who came with friends from the nearby 15th district of the capital.
Officials have urged people to continue respecting social distancing limits as the country emerges from its third COVID-19 lockdown.
Since Wednesday, bars and restaurants are allowed to serve patrons indoors for the first time since October, and the government plans to drop the nationwide curfew entirely on June 30.
Health authorities reported 3,972 new cases over the previous 24 hours on Saturday, while the number of patients in intensive care fell to 2,110, far below the peak of nearly 6,000 during the third wave of cases that began in March.
Thirty-four deaths were reported, bringing the French total to 110,407.


Gas explosion in China kills 11, rescue operation ongoing

Gas explosion in China kills 11, rescue operation ongoing
Updated 13 June 2021

Gas explosion in China kills 11, rescue operation ongoing

Gas explosion in China kills 11, rescue operation ongoing
  • Rescue efforts were continuing, a statement by the government in Shiyan city said
BEIJING: At least 11 people were killed and 37 others seriously injured when a gas line explosion ripped through a residential compound in central China’s Hubei province on Sunday, local officials said.
Rescue efforts were continuing, a statement by the government in Shiyan city said, adding at least 144 people were pulled from a badly damaged market building.

As summit ends, G-7 urged to deliver on vaccines, climate

As summit ends, G-7 urged to deliver on vaccines, climate
Updated 13 June 2021

As summit ends, G-7 urged to deliver on vaccines, climate

As summit ends, G-7 urged to deliver on vaccines, climate
  • Uncertain how firm the group’s commitments will be on coronavirus vaccines
  • Leaders mingled with Queen Elizabeth II at a royal reception on their first evening

FALMOUTH, England: The Group of Seven leaders aim to end their first summit in two years with a punchy set of promises Sunday, including vaccinating the world against coronavirus, making huge corporations pay their fair share of taxes and tackling climate change with a blend of technology and money.
They want to show that international cooperation is back after the upheavals caused both by the pandemic and the unpredictability of former US President Donald Trump. And they want to convey that the club of wealthy democracies — Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States — is a better friend to poorer nations than authoritarian rivals such as China.
But it was uncertain how firm the group’s commitments will be on coronavirus vaccines, the economy and the environment when the leaders issue their final communique. Also unclear was whether all of the leaders would back the United States’ call to chastise China for repressing its Uyghur minority and other abuses.
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the summit’s host, wanted the three-day meeting to fly the flag for a “Global Britain,” his government’s initiative to give the midsized country outsized influence when it comes to global problem-solving.
Brexit cast a shadow over that goal during the summit on the coast of southwest England. European Union leaders and US President Joe Biden voiced concerns about problems with new UK-EU trade rules that have heightened tensions in Northern Ireland.
But overall, the mood has been positive: The leaders smiled for the cameras on the beach at cliff-fringed Carbis Bay, a village and resort that became a traffic-clogged fortress for the meeting. The last G-7 summit was in France in 2019. The pandemic scuttled the planned 2020 event in the United States.
The leaders mingled with Queen Elizabeth II at a royal reception on their first evening, and were served steak and lobster at a beach barbecue on their second.
America’s allies were visibly relieved to have the US back as an engaged international player after the “America First” policy of the Trump administration.
“The United States is back, and democracies of the world are standing together,” Biden said as he arrived in the UK on the first foreign trip of his 5-month-old presidency. After the G-7 summit, the president is to have tea with the queen on Sunday, attend a NATO summit in Brussels on Monday and hold talks with Russian leader Vladimir Putin in Geneva on Wednesday.
At the G-7, Johnson described Biden as a “breath of fresh air.” French President Emmanuel Macron, after speaking one-to-one with Biden, said, “It’s great to have a US president part of the club and very willing to cooperate.”
The re-energized G-7 made ambitious declarations during their meetings about girls’ education, preventing future pandemics and using the finance system to fund green growth. Above all, they vowed to share vaccine doses with less well-off nations that urgently need them. Johnson said the group would pledge at least 1 billion doses, with half that coming from the United States and 100 million from Britain.
World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus commended the vaccine pledge but said it’s not enough. To truly end the pandemic, he said, 11 billion doses are needed to vaccinate at least 70 percent of the world’s population by the middle of next year.
“We need more and we need them faster,” Tedros said.
Public health advocates said much more than just doses was needed, including money and logistical help to get shots into the arms of people in poorer countries.
“It’s not enough to just get vaccines flown into capitals,” said Lily Caprani, head of COVID-19 vaccines advocacy for UNICEF. “We can’t let them potentially go to waste or be at risk or be at risk of not being delivered. So it’s a real end-to-end solution that’s needed.”
The leaders’ final communique is expected to formally embrace placing a global minimum tax of at least 15 percent on large multinational companies to stop corporations from using tax havens to shift profits and to avoid taxes.


Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack
Updated 13 June 2021

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack

Canada pays final homage to Muslim family killed in terror attack
  • Canadian PM Trudeau called the killings a “terrorist attack” and vowed to clamp down on far-right groups and online hate
  • The four victims were killed by Nathaniel Veltman while they were out for an evening walk near their home in London, Ontario

LONDON, Canada: Several hundred people gathered in London, Ontario on Saturday to pay homage to a Muslim family deliberately mowed down by the driver of a pick-up truck, in an attack that has shocked Canadians and which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau denounced as “terrorist.”
Four members of the Afzaal family — a man and his wife, their teenage daughter and his mother — were out for a walk in their London neighborhood Sunday when a 20-year-old man in a black pickup truck drove into them on purpose, according to authorities.
A fifth family member, a nine-year-old boy, was seriously injured.
On Saturday, hundreds of people filled a large parking lot and a football field next to the London Islamic center, where a private ceremony was held, to join in a public remembrance around the family’s four caskets, each covered with a Canadian flag.
“The very fact that their coffins are draped in the beautiful Canadian flag is a testimony of the fact that the entire Canadian nation stands with them,” Pakistan’s ambassador to Canada, Raza Bashir Tarar, told the crowd.
The ceremony, with brief remarks and prayers, was broadcast live on major Canadian networks.
“We are not alone in our grief,” said Ali Islam, an uncle of Madiha Salman, one of the victims. He stressed that the outpouring of support “has been the first step toward finding a way to heal.”
“We realized that our extended family was much larger than we could have ever imagined.”
Another speaker at the event, Sajid Ali Mohamed, noted that the attack on the Muslim family has been described as terrorism, instead of being blamed on mental illness.
“If it’s not a turning point, at least it’s a nudge in the right direction,” he said.

Pallbearers arrange the caskets at a funeral service for the terror attack victims in London, Ontario, on June 12, 2021. (Geoff Robins/The Canadian Press via AP)

The funeral cortege then headed to a cemetery — as people lined the route in a show of solidarity — for the private burial of Salman Afzaal, 46, his wife Madiha, 44, their daughter Yumna, 15 and Salman’s mother Talat, 74.
Many people wore either green ribbons, in support of the Muslim community, or mauve ones, Yumna’s favorite color.The attack has badly shaken the Muslim community and other Canadians as well.
Numerous vigils and solemn commemorations have taken place across Canada in recent days.
On Friday, several thousand people joined in an ecumenical walk through the streets of London, which is home to some 30,000 Muslims.
Many bore posters reading “We are all human” or “Hate kills.”
People also paid homage Friday in Quebec City, where a January 2017 mosque shooting claimed six lives.
The latest attack has fueled debate about the prevalence of Islamophobia in Canada and, within the Muslim community heightened fears that outward signs of religious affiliation can make a person a target.
In an interview with the CBC network, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan said the attack had shocked people across Pakistan.
He called on the international community to take action against “hate websites which create hatred among human beings.”
“Some international leaders, or leaders in the Western countries, actually don’t understand this phenomenon,” he added in excerpts of the interview released ahead of its broadcast on Sunday.
Twenty-year-old Nathaniel Veltman, who has no criminal record and no known link to any extremist group, has been charged in the attack with four counts of first-degree murder and one of attempted murder.
Police say the attack was planned and motivated by hatred, and have not ruled out adding terrorism-related charges.
Trudeau has promised to step up the fight against extremist groups.
Following the attack, Canadian deputies adopted a nonbinding resolution, introduced by the left-leaning New Democratic Party, calling for a national summit on Islamophobia this summer — as many Canadian Muslim organizations have demanded.