Saudi Arabia’s economy likely to grow in 2021 and 2022, says report

Higher oil output amid an OPEC+ agreement has helped push Saudi Arabia's economic recovery in 2021. (Shutterstock photo)
Higher oil output amid an OPEC+ agreement has helped push Saudi Arabia's economic recovery in 2021. (Shutterstock photo)
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Updated 01 August 2021

Saudi Arabia’s economy likely to grow in 2021 and 2022, says report

Saudi Arabia’s economy likely to grow in 2021 and 2022, says report
  • Capital Economics' forecast a further evidence that the Saudi economic recovery has taken off in 2021

RIYADHH Saudi Arabia’s economy is poised to grow from 2.2 percent to 4.8 percent in 2021 and from 4.1 percent to 6.3 percent in 2022, said a Capital Economics report.

The new forecasts are further evidence that the Saudi economic recovery has taken off in 2021.

At the start of the year, the Kingdom’s Ministry of Finance said that it expected 3.2 percent growth this year — reversing the pandemic-driven downturn of 2020. The International Monetary Fund forecast just 2.1 percent growth two months ago.

The Saudi economy is expected to maintain growth in the second half of the year. The expansion is also backed by higher oil output amid an OPEC+ agreement.

The Kingdom’s finance, insurance, real estate, and business sectors are likely to expand by 9 percent annually and their relative share to overall economic activity will grow by 12.7 percent.

Meanwhile, the services sector is also likely to grow about 10 percent annually on average, implying that its relative gross domestic product (GDP) share will climb to almost 40 percent in 2030.

 


Saudi Arabia insurance reforms will enhance sector — CAIS CEO

Saudi Arabia insurance reforms will enhance sector — CAIS CEO
Updated 8 sec ago

Saudi Arabia insurance reforms will enhance sector — CAIS CEO

Saudi Arabia insurance reforms will enhance sector — CAIS CEO
RIYADH: Saudi Arabia may be the first country in the world to witness a merger between three insurance companies following regulatory reforms, according to Sulaiman Binmayouf, CEO at United Co. for Actuarial Services CAIS.

Many of Saudi Arabia’s 29 insurance companies need capital infusions or mergers to meet the requirements of regulators, after they ordered to triple capital to SR300 million from SR100 million, Binmayouf said.

The Kingdom’s insurance companies are only profitable with high premiums, some of which they have to freeze as reserves, meaning they can’t invest the money, he said.

However, he expects the adoption of IFRS 17 standards by the insurance sector in the Kingdom will help solve the problem.

IFRS 17 is an International Financial Reporting Standard that was issued by the International Accounting Standards Board in May 2017.

The financial statements of insurance companies on the Capital Market Authority (CMA) website are not sufficient for taking an investment decision, said Binmayouf.

The standard will provide a more accurate supervision and disclosure process in the development of financial statements, giving investors a clearer idea of whether they want to invest in the company or not, he said.

“Investors should look at the status of insurance companies in terms of the board of directors and committees, and review the strategic plan and financial statements to make the investment decision,” he said.

That will lead to more capital flowing into the insurance sector, while supporting its stability, he said. IFRS 17 will be implemented in stages, as decided by the central bank.

Fed policy tightening not all bad for Gulf economies — Jefferies

Fed policy tightening not all bad for Gulf economies — Jefferies
Updated 3 min 52 sec ago

Fed policy tightening not all bad for Gulf economies — Jefferies

Fed policy tightening not all bad for Gulf economies — Jefferies
  • A likely strengthening of the dollar, to which Gulf currencies are pegged, may push down inflation, because it makes imports less expensive

RIYADH: The impending end of super-loose monetary policy from the Federal Reserve will have both positive and negative effects on the economies of the Arabian Gulf, according to Alia Moubayed, a managing director at investment bank Jefferies International.

A likely strengthening of the dollar, to which Gulf currencies are pegged, may push down inflation, because it makes imports less expensive, Moubayed said in an interview with Asharq.

Higher interest rates on dollar-denominated assets tend to lead to outflows from emerging markets, but Moubayed said that the Gulf markets have recently witnessed an influx of foreign capital, especially into stocks, and so should not be affected as badly as many of their EM peers.

Higher interest rates will increase the financing burden on governments with large budget and trade deficits, such as Bahrain, Moubayed said.

However, countries such as Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE will “benefit from shrinking deficits due to the rise in oil prices and the increase in revenues in national currencies,” she said.

The Federal Reserve announced yesterday that it will likely start reducing its asset purchase program soon, and said policy makers are increasingly minded to start raising interest rates in 2022 instead of 2023 as previously envisioned.

If progress toward employment and inflation targets continues, the slowdown in asset purchases may start in November and end in mid-2022, the Fed said.


APICORP sukuk program given expected AA rating by Fitch

APICORP sukuk program given expected AA rating by Fitch
Updated 47 min ago

APICORP sukuk program given expected AA rating by Fitch

APICORP sukuk program given expected AA rating by Fitch
  • A default in APICORP's sukuk program would be considered a default in the parent, Fitch said

RIYADH: APICORP, the multilateral development bank set up by Arab oil producers, has received a rating of AA(EXP) by Fitch for its sukuk program.

APICORP Sukuk Ltd. (ASL) is incorporated in the Cayman Islands with the sole purpose of issuing Islamic debt. The final rating is contingent on Fitch receiving documents that support information already provided.

ASL is expected to receive the same AA rating as APICORP as a default in the sukuk program would be considered a default in the parent, Fitch said. APICORP’s rating is based on Fitch’s solvency and liquidity assessment and a “medium risk” business environment.

APICORP was established in 1975 by the 10 members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC) with the aim of developing the Arab world’s energy sector through equity investment, debt financing, financial advisory and energy research services.


UAE allocates $17.6bn to Emirati housing program in Dubai

UAE allocates $17.6bn to Emirati housing program in Dubai
Updated 54 min 23 sec ago

UAE allocates $17.6bn to Emirati housing program in Dubai

UAE allocates $17.6bn to Emirati housing program in Dubai
  • Land plots allocated to Emirati housing projects in Dubai increased to 1.7 billion square feet.

RIYADH: Dubai Ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum has approved the allocation of 65 billion dirhams ($17.6 billion) to a housing program for Emirati citizens in Dubai, to be spent over the next two decades, according to a statement from the Dubai Media Office.

Sheikh Mohammed, who is also prime minister of the UAE, issued directives to quadruple the number of Emiratis benefiting from the housing program from next year, and to increase the land plots allocated to Emirati housing projects in Dubai to 1.7 billion square feet.

“We are working to develop a comprehensive plan for ensuring our citizens have access to high quality housing over the next 20 years,” said Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, deputy ruler of Dubai. “Dubai’s urban development plans are subject to constant review and our housing policy will continue to evolve according to the requirements of our citizens.”

The Dubai 2040 Urban Master Plan sets out a comprehensive future map for sustainable urban development in the city, and focuses on enhancing people’s happiness and quality of life in line with the UAE’s vision for the next 50 years.


Saudi Capital Market Authority seeks to double $213bn funds under management

Saudi Capital Market Authority seeks to double $213bn funds under management
Updated 24 September 2021

Saudi Capital Market Authority seeks to double $213bn funds under management

Saudi Capital Market Authority seeks to double $213bn funds under management
  • The CMA wants to create more jobs in the financial sector by increasing the assets under management

RIYADH: The Saudi Capital Market Authority (CMA) aspires to double the funds invested through managed channels from SR800 billion ($213 billion), SPA reported, citing the CMA’s Assistant Undersecretary for Strategic and International Affairs Ahmed Al-Enezi.

The CMA wants to create more jobs in the financial sector by increasing the assets under management in funds, portfolios or other innovative financial tools, including private equity funds, venture capital, and financial technology, he said.

To that end, Saudi Arabia has invested in infrastructure, including the Saudi Fintech initiative, launched by the Saudi Central Bank in partnership with the CMA in April 2018, as a catalyst for the development of the financial technology sector in the Kingdom, said Al-Enezi.

The Fintech accelerator is helping to build the capabilities and talent required by financial technology companies, and is supporting entrepreneurs at every stage of their development, Al-Enezi said.