Afghan man in UK faces Austria extradition on suspicion of rape, murder of girl

Afghan man in UK faces Austria extradition on suspicion of rape, murder of girl
Stephansplatz metro station, with St. Stephen’s church in the background, at the center of Vienna. (Wikimedia Commons)
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Updated 13 September 2021

Afghan man in UK faces Austria extradition on suspicion of rape, murder of girl

Afghan man in UK faces Austria extradition on suspicion of rape, murder of girl
  • Rasuili Zubaidullah arrived in UK 2 weeks after body of 13-year-old found in Vienna
  • He gave false name to immigration officials; 3 others detained in Austria

LONDON: An Afghan refugee who claimed asylum in the UK has been arrested on suspicion of being involved in the rape and murder of a 13-year-old girl in Austria.

The victim, known only as Leonie, was drugged and gang-raped by a group of men, all believed to be Afghans, before she was suffocated. Her body was discovered rolled up inside a carpet in Vienna on June 26.

Rasuili Zubaidullah, 22, was arrested two weeks after he arrived in Britain on July 18, under a fake name, on a boat carrying refugees.

He applied for asylum and was housed in a London hotel before Austrian police contacted their UK counterparts.

He was detained on July 29 by the UK National Extradition Unit and faces being sent back to Austria, where three other Afghan men have also been arrested in connection with the murder.

Extradition proceedings are likely to begin in January, after Zubaidullah appeared in court via video link from prison on Sept. 3. He is scheduled to appear again in court on Oct. 1.


Bangladesh to launch Myanmar curriculum for Rohingya refugee children

Bangladesh to launch Myanmar curriculum for Rohingya refugee children
Updated 27 October 2021

Bangladesh to launch Myanmar curriculum for Rohingya refugee children

Bangladesh to launch Myanmar curriculum for Rohingya refugee children
  • Stalled by COVID-19 lockdowns, pilot program now set to swing into action

DHAKA: Bangladeshi authorities and the UN are preparing to introduce formal education using a Myanmar curriculum for hundreds of thousands of Rohingya children living in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar.

The fishing port in southeastern Bangladesh, hosts more than 1.1 million Rohingya Muslims — members of an ethnic and religious minority group who fled persecution in neighboring Myanmar during a military crackdown in northern Rakhine state in 2017.

The children, who constitute half of the refugee population, now attend 6,250 informal learning centers run by UN agencies and aid partners at 34 camps in Cox’s Bazar, which provide basic education to more than 354,000 students.

The Bangladeshi government in January 2020 agreed with the UN that the Rohingya children should be provided with Myanmar education to prepare them for a future return to their country. Stalled by coronavirus disease pandemic lockdowns for one-and-half years, a pilot program is now set to be launched as Bangladeshi schools reopened last month.

Regina de la Portilla, UN refugee agency spokesperson at Cox’s Bazar, recently told Arab News: “The Myanmar curriculum is to be introduced in learning centers, as per the government of Bangladesh request, with the objective that children can restart their education when they are able to safely and voluntarily return to their home country. Preparations are completed to roll out the pilot.”

The foreign ministry expected the program to be launched soon as final preparations are underway. A ministry official, who wished to remain anonymous, said: “We are working on it and are currently busy with last-minute preparations. We hope to roll out the curriculum anytime soon.

“We have made some observations in the curriculum to incorporate Myanmar culture. Our objective is to prepare them to integrate with the Myanmar society once they are repatriated,” he said.

BRAC, the largest development organization based in Bangladesh, which has been running learning centers for 65,000 Rohingya children in Cox’s Bazar, plans to teach them in Myanmar’s main language, Burmese.

Khan Mohammed Ferdous, BRAC’s education program chief at Cox’s Bazar, told Arab News: “Teachers at our learning centers have received basic training but are yet to be trained for the new curriculum.

“Currently, we are following a learning competence framework and approach, a government-approved guideline for the informal education system. Gradually, the framework will jump into the Myanmar curriculum.”

Rohingya parents in Cox’s Bazar are waiting for the introduction of the new curriculum, which would help prepare them for future repatriation.

Fatema Begum, 35, said she had been worrying about her four children as formal education was not available at the camps.

“The introduction of the Myanmar curriculum in the camps is inspiring news to me because my children will have the opportunity to learn more about their homeland. They will have the eligibility to pursue higher education,” she added.

Abdur Rahim, 41, a father-of-three, was also hoping for a better future for his children.

He said: “The boys and girls at Rohingya camps have nothing to do except roam around. When the Myanmar curriculum is launched, they will be able to receive some quality education, which will help them to pursue a better career in Myanmar.”

Prof. Amena Mohsin from the University of Dhaka’s international relations department described the move as a “message” to the world that Rohingya refugees were Myanmar citizens whose opportunities in Bangladesh were limited.

She said: “There is no point in teaching the refugee children with the Bangladeshi curriculum since they are not allowed to get engaged in any formal job in Bangladesh. The Myanmar curriculum will help them prepare for livelihoods when they return to Myanmar.”


‘Afghanistan still exists’: Hope in Kabul after T20 World Cup win over Scotland

‘Afghanistan still exists’: Hope in Kabul after T20 World Cup win over Scotland
Updated 27 October 2021

‘Afghanistan still exists’: Hope in Kabul after T20 World Cup win over Scotland

‘Afghanistan still exists’: Hope in Kabul after T20 World Cup win over Scotland
  • Taliban officials took to social media to celebrate the win and wish the team success in future

KABUL: Residents of Kabul on Tuesday rejoiced at Afghanistan’s T20 World Cup victory against Scotland, with many saying the first major win for the cricket team since the Taliban takeover in mid-August was proof the country still existed.

Despite decades of violence and war, cricket is enthusiastically followed in Afghanistan, and on Monday, the Afghan national team beat Scotland in a match played at the Sharjah Cricket Stadium in the UAE.  

“I couldn’t stop crying as I saw our team with our national flag — as we know the political situation in Afghanistan is not good, but in the meantime, it shows that a country called ‘Afghanistan’ still exists,” Ali Khan Shanghai, a shopkeeper in Kabul, told Arab News.

For Abdul Ahad Hassani, another Kabul resident, the win also symbolized the nation’s survival.

“Raising the Afghanistan national flag and playing the national anthem in these games indicates that Afghanistan can still breathe,” he said. “Beating Scotland by a huge margin … shows that Afghanistan still exists, and no one can defeat the new generation that we have.”

Abdul Saboor Atayee, a student at Al-Azhar University in Kabul, said that with the current unstable political situation in the country, the victory was a “great comeback for the nation, that we are still here.”

While the Taliban are not in favor of public entertainment and banned many forms of it during their previous rule between 1996-2001, officials celebrated the win, with Taliban government spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid taking to social media to wish the team more success.

“Congratulations to all Afghans on the victory of the Afghan team in the ongoing World Twenty20,” Mujahid tweeted on Monday. “Congratulations to the team and wish them more success in the future.”

Afghanistan’s permanent representative-designate to the UN, and former Taliban spokesman, Suhail Shaheen, also took to Twitter.

“Well done boys!” he said. “May Allah favour you with future victories.”

Afghanistan Cricket Board member Haji Hassin Zadran told Arab News there was hope for more wins in the tournament as Afghanistan prepares to take on neighboring Pakistan during their next match on Friday.

“We hope that in this T20, we will be one of the major teams,” he said. “Our lions created history, they are the cause of smiles, and we wish them further success.”


UK monarch won’t visit UN climate conference in person

UK monarch won’t visit UN climate conference in person
Updated 26 October 2021

UK monarch won’t visit UN climate conference in person

UK monarch won’t visit UN climate conference in person
  • The 95-year-old monarch has “regretfully’’ decided that she will no longer travel to Glasgow to attend the reception on Nov. 1
  • “Her Majesty is disappointed not to attend the reception but will deliver an address to the assembled delegates via a recorded video message,’’ the palace said

LONDON: Queen Elizabeth II has canceled her planned engagement at the UN climate conference, accepting doctors’ advice to rest, Buckingham Palace said Tuesday.
The 95-year-old monarch has “regretfully’’ decided that she will no longer travel to Glasgow to attend the reception on Nov. 1 — a move that will dash the hopes of Britain’s Conservative government, which is hosting the event. The climate conference runs from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12.
“Her Majesty is disappointed not to attend the reception but will deliver an address to the assembled delegates via a recorded video message,’’ the palace said.
The news came after the sovereign held virtual audiences Tuesday at Windsor Castle — the first work obligations since revelations that her doctors ordered her to rest last week.
The 95-year-old sovereign greeted the ambassador of the Republic of Korea during her first technology-aided appearance since she was driven to London’s King Edward VII’s Hospital on Oct. 20 for “preliminary investigations.” She returned to her Windsor Castle home at lunchtime the next day.
The queen underwent the medical tests after she canceled a scheduled trip to mark 100 years since the creation of Northern Ireland, and the palace said she had “reluctantly” accepted advice to rest for a few days. The matter was not related to COVID-19.
The period of rest followed a hectic few days for the monarch in which she held audiences with diplomats, had a reception at Windsor Castle for global business leaders and attended the horse races at Ascot.
Her hospital visit last week came amid general disquiet about Elizabeth’s health. Days earlier, she was seen using a walking stick at a Westminster Abbey service marking the centenary of the Royal British Legion, an armed forces charity. Though she had used a cane in 2003, it was after she underwent knee surgery.
The queen’s husband, Prince Philip, died in April 2021 at age 99. Though Elizabeth has enjoyed robust health throughout her life, she is Britain’s longest-lived and longest-reigning monarch. She is due to celebrate her Platinum Jubilee — 70 years on the throne — next year.


Up to 3 migrants feared dead off English coast

Up to 3 migrants feared dead off English coast
Updated 26 October 2021

Up to 3 migrants feared dead off English coast

Up to 3 migrants feared dead off English coast
  • Search teams continue to look for the people, believed to be Somalis
  • MP: ‘The potential loss of life is extremely distressing’

LONDON: British Border Force officers and rescue teams are searching the English Channel amid fears that three migrants have died trying to cross from France to England in a small boat.

Two more people have been pulled from the water by rescuers, who continue to search the area using a helicopter and plane.

After being alerted to the distressed boat on Monday, officers continued to search for any more survivors well into Tuesday.

It is understood that they are looking for Somali passengers who may have left France as early as the weekend, the Daily Mail reported.

Days of treacherous weather and winds have further exacerbated fears for the safety of the other passengers.

Harwich and North Essex MP Sir Bernard Jenkin said: “Obviously the potential loss of life is extremely distressing. We should be extremely grateful to Border Force, the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution) and search and rescue teams for all their efforts.”

He added: “We must redouble our efforts to deal with the criminal gangs who are trafficking migrants, taking money from them and putting them in great peril.”

If the three missing individuals are confirmed dead, this incident will have been one of the deadliest ever off the coast of England.

The UK has experienced record numbers of arrivals of refugees and migrants crossing in small boats from France.

The short but treacherous journey has been made by an estimated 2,500 people in October alone.

Figures so far this year have tripled those from the whole of 2020, with some 19,500 making crossings compared with 8,410.

A Coastguard spokesperson told the Daily Mail: “HM Coastguard will continue to safeguard life around the seas and coastal areas of the UK, working with search and rescue resources in the area.

“If a vessel needs search and rescue assistance, HM Coastguard will continue to respond and rescue those in danger.”

Despite controversy from anti-immigration elements of British society and media, the RNLI — a life-saving service at sea that relies almost entirely on public donations — has reiterated its firm commitment to protecting the lives of anyone caught in distress off Britain’s coast.

“Those we rescue are vulnerable people in danger & distress,” it tweeted earlier this year. “Each of them is someone’s father, mother, son or daughter — every life is precious. This is why we launch.”


Daesh in Afghanistan could be able to attack US in 6 months-Pentagon official

Daesh in Afghanistan could be able to attack US in 6 months-Pentagon official
Updated 26 October 2021

Daesh in Afghanistan could be able to attack US in 6 months-Pentagon official

Daesh in Afghanistan could be able to attack US in 6 months-Pentagon official
  • Afghanistan could still pose serious national security concerns for the US even after it ended its two-decade-old war in defeat in August
  • Undersecretary of defense for policy said it was still unclear whether the Taliban has the ability to fight Daesh effectively following the US withdrawal

WASHINGTON: The US intelligence community has assessed that Daesh in Afghanistan could have the capability to attack the US in as little as six months, and has the intention to do so, a senior Pentagon official told Congress on Tuesday.
The remarks by Colin Kahl, undersecretary of defense for policy, are the latest reminder that Afghanistan could still pose serious national security concerns for the United States even after it ended its two-decade-old war in defeat in August.
The Taliban, which won the war, are enemies of Daesh and have seen its attempts to impose law and order after the US pullout thwarted by suicide bombings and other attacks claimed by Daesh.
They include bombings targeting the minority Shiite sect and even a Daesh beheading of a member of a Taliban militia force in the eastern city of Jalalabad.
In testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Kahl said it was still unclear whether the Taliban has the ability to fight Daesh effectively following the US withdrawal in August. The United States fought the Taliban as well as striking groups like Daesh and Al-Qaeda.
“It is our assessment that the Taliban and Daesh-K are mortal enemies. So the Taliban is highly motivated to go after Daesh-K. Their ability to do so, I think, is to be determined,” Kahl said, using an acronym for Daesh in Afghanistan.
Kahl estimated Daesh had a “cadre of a few thousand” fighters.
Acting Foreign Minister Amir Khan Muttaqi of the new Taliban government has said the threat from Daesh militants will be addressed. He also said Afghanistan would not become a base for attacks on other countries.
Kahl suggested Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan posed a more complex problem, given its ties to the Taliban. It was those ties that triggered the US military intervention in Afghanistan in 2001 following Al-Qaeda’s Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington. The Taliban had harbored Al-Qaeda leaders.
Kahl said it could take Al-Qaeda “a year or two” to regenerate the capability to carry out attacks outside of Afghanistan against the United States.
Democratic President Joe Biden, whose supervision of the chaotic end to the war last summer has damaged his approval ratings, has said the United States will continue to be vigilant against threats emanating from Afghanistan by carrying out intelligence-gathering operations in the country that would identify threats from groups like Al-Qaeda and Daesh.
Kahl said the goal was to disrupt those groups so that Daesh and Al-Qaeda don’t become capable of striking the United States.
“We need to be vigilant in disrupting that,” he said.
Still, US officials privately warn that identifying and disrupting groups like Al-Qaeda and Daesh is extremely difficult without any troops in the country. Drones capable of striking Daesh and Al-Qaeda targets are being flown in from the Gulf.
Kahl said the United States did not yet have any agreement with countries neighboring Afghanistan to host troops for counterterrorism efforts.