How Saudi Arabia is initiating action on greenhouse gas emissions reduction

How Saudi Arabia is initiating action on greenhouse gas emissions reduction
The Kingdom is aiming to plant more than 10 billion trees over the course of the next two decades as part of the Saudi Green Initiative.
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Updated 21 September 2021

How Saudi Arabia is initiating action on greenhouse gas emissions reduction

How Saudi Arabia is initiating action on greenhouse gas emissions reduction
  • At UNGA, Saudi Arabia will show it is a leader in the global campaign for energy sustainability
  • The Kingdom has a big environmental responsibility as a major player in global energy markets

DUBAI: Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, the energy minister of Saudi Arabia, set out the Kingdom’s position on climate change loud and clear at the Future Investment Initiative forum in Riyadh earlier this year.

“We are long believers in the Paris Agreement and are doing everything in our power to achieve it,” he said, before issuing a challenge to other countries to match the Kingdom’s ambition in the campaign to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thereby mitigate global warming.

“Whatever we will do in the Kingdom will support emissions reduction, and we are doing it willingly because the economic benefits (from new energy technologies) are clear. We will enjoy being looked at as a reasonable and responsible international citizen because we will be doing more than most European countries by 2030 to combat climate change,” he said.

That message — Saudi Arabia will be a leader in the global campaign for energy sustainability — will be hammered home at the continuing 76th session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York, where climate change and sustainability are bound to be key issues.

The UNGA meetings are an opportunity each year to monitor progress on the UN’s sustainable development goals, the set of 17 policy objectives put in place in 2015 as a “blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all,” and intended for full implementation by 2030.

That time frame coincides with Saudi Arabia’s own Vision 2030 strategy, itself designed to transform the Kingdom and diversify its economy away from oil dependency. Sustainability is a vital part of the Vision 2030 plan.

The message will be driven home in New York, and next month in Glasgow when the COP26 summit takes crucial decisions on the next phase of implementation of the Paris Agreements.

Saudi Arabia’s position on climate change is long-standing and clear: The Kingdom shares the concern of the rest of the world that global warming presents a risk to humanity if allowed to go unchecked. Moreover, as a major player in global energy markets, Saudi Arabia has a big responsibility for protecting the planet.




Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman set out the Kingdom’s position on climate change loud and clear at the Future Investment Initiative forum earlier this year

But, precisely because of its role as a leading energy producer, the Saudi position is far more nuanced than some in Europe and North America who have turned against hydrocarbon fuels in any form.

One Saudi policy adviser told Arab News: “We reject the false choice between preserving the economy and protecting the environment. We view the rising global demand for energy products as an opportunity to re-imagine the future of energy globally, and through the Kingdom’s Vision 2030, we aim to pioneer this future.”

That thinking is behind many of the energy policy initiatives that have emerged from Riyadh over the past couple of years. Prince Abdulaziz has long been an enthusiast of sustainability and energy efficiency, and the drive toward a comprehensive policy on climate change has been given new impetus since he was appointed energy minister two years ago.

Central to the Kingdom’s strategy on climate change is the concept of the circular carbon economy (CCE) — a framework for tackling climate change while continuing to enjoy the benefits of economic growth driven by oil and gas, the most efficient and powerful energy sources mankind has ever developed.

CCE is based on the principles of the 4Rs — to reduce, reuse, recycle and ultimately remove harmful CO2 and other emissions from industrial processes and the atmosphere.

The Kingdom has a longstanding policy of aiming to reduce greenhouse gases through energy-efficiency programs that target travel, industry and construction. Saudi oil is already one of the “cleanest” crudes in the world, as measured by independent scientists.

Saudi Aramco also has a big R&D program in place to develop more energy-efficient motor engines. Hydrocarbon products are reused and recycled across the Kingdom’s industrial sector.

Saudi Arabia long ago ceased the practice of gas flaring, which is still common practice in many oil-producing countries.

One of the persistent features of the Kingdom’s energy policy has been to use hydrocarbons and their byproducts as non-fuel ingredients in the chemical and other manufacturing industry, and this trend has accelerated since the merger between Saudi Aramco and SABIC, the petrochemicals giant.

Most climate experts agree that it is the fourth R — remove — that is the most challenging, but also potentially the most effective in lowering greenhouse gas emissions and slowing climate change to the 1.5C global temperature increase the Paris Agreement requires by 2050.

Saudi Arabia has a headstart in technologies linked to carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), which aims to prevent CO2 from escaping into the atmosphere, either by reusing it in industrial processes such as building materials or storing it in secure “sinks” such as old oil reservoirs and other natural locations.




The Kingdom’s reliance on oil could soon become a thing of the past, with megaprojects such as NEOM being built on zero-carbon models. (AFP)

The Kingdom has also been funding R&D into direct air capture (DAC), which some climate scientists see as the long-term “silver bullet” in combating climate change. If CO2 can be successfully removed from the air on a global scale, that would go a long way to solving the problem of global warming.

However, until the technology is proven and widely available, there are other techniques that can be implemented to ameliorate airborne carbon. Again Saudi Arabia has been at the forefront with its Saudi Green Initiative, which envisions the planting of 10 billion trees in the Kingdom over the next two decades as part of a wider Middle East Green Initiative that will eventually see a total of 50 billion trees planted in the region.

When he launched the initiative earlier this year, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said: “As a leading global oil producer, we are fully aware of our responsibility in advancing the fight against the climate crisis, and that just as we played a leading role in stabilizing energy markets during the oil and gas era, we will work to lead the coming green era.”

The other major plank of the Saudi Green Initiatives is a commitment to lift the proportion of renewables in the Kingdom’s domestic energy mix to 50 percent by 2030, replacing oil as an energy-generating fuel, with the balance to come from natural gas.

The Kingdom has already begun this program, with big wind and solar projects announced earlier this year to generate electricity from renewable sources.

The jewel in the crown of the Saudi sustainability strategy is the NEOM megacity under construction in the Kingdom’s northwest, which will have a zero-carbon footprint, with all its power and water needs satisfied by non-hydrocarbon sources, notably “green” hydrogen.

All the Saudi mega-projects of Vision 2030 also have sustainability at the heart of their plans.

Saudi Arabia is already a pioneer in developing hydrogen fuels, and last year exported the first shipment of “blue” ammonia — a much cleaner fuel that is a byproduct of the oil and gas industrial process — to Japan for use in that country’s electricity generation industry.




Saudi Aramco’s Shaybah oilfield. The company is one of the most profitable in the world. (Reuters)

An alliance with Germany was announced this year to study and develop hydrogen fuels, combining Saudi energy expertise with German engineering and technological prowess.

Nobody in New York — or Glasgow next month — is underestimating the scale of the climate challenge ahead, but Saudi Arabia has shown, and will continue to show, that a responsible approach to the problem can be adopted without totally abandoning the power and efficiency of hydrocarbons.

The Kingdom is winning allies in this challenge. At last year’s G20 summit of world leaders, the CCE framework promoted by Saudi Arabia was adopted unanimously as the preferred global methodology for combating global warming.


Saudi aid agency continues relief projects in Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon

Saudi aid agency continues relief projects in Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon
Updated 28 October 2021

Saudi aid agency continues relief projects in Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon

Saudi aid agency continues relief projects in Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon

HODEIDAH: In a single week, more than 301,000 liters of clean water were pumped into tanks, and an additional 287,000 liters were provided for domestic use, as part of an ongoing King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center project to supply water and environmental sanitation in Yemen’s Hodeidah governorate.
KSrelief also delivered medical supplies to the Jordanian government to support the health sector in the country and help authorities battle the coronavirus pandemic. They included liquid medical oxygen, oxygen tanks and equipment for intensive care departments.
The aid was officially presented by the Saudi Ambassador to Jordan Naif bin Bandar Al-Sudairi to the Jordanian Minister of Health Firas Ibrahim Al-Hawari.
Al-Sudairi said that the Kingdom and Jordan are bound by strong and distinguished relations that are supported by the leaderships of both countries.
KSrelief said it also continues to distribute bread in northern Lebanon as part of the third phase of the Al-Amal Charity Bakery Project. It has been distributing 20,000 bundles of bread daily to needy Syrian, Lebanese and Palestinian families for 12 months. Each family receives two bundles and the project is benefiting 50,000 people.
The project is part of the Kingdom’s efforts, through the work of KSrelief, to improve the living conditions of refugees and provide them with basic food supplies, authorities said.


Saudi medical team takes part in groundbreaking COVID-19 study

Saudi medical team takes part in groundbreaking COVID-19 study
Updated 28 October 2021

Saudi medical team takes part in groundbreaking COVID-19 study

Saudi medical team takes part in groundbreaking COVID-19 study

RIYADH: The findings of an international study on the effectiveness of blood thinners in reducing COVID-19-related deaths have been published in the British Medical Journal, with the King Saud University Medical City Clinical Research Unit playing a key role.
The comparative scientific research, which included King Saud University Medical City, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, studied the effect of blood thinners (heparin drugs) used daily for most patients in hospitals to alleviate dangerous side effects of COVID-19.
In the Kingdom, 148 patients took part in the study, representing one-third of total participants around the world.
Results show that deaths in a high-dose groups were less than those in a preventive dose group. Heparin drugs in the latter group were used as an anticoagulant to decrease harmful blood clotting.
The head of the Saudi research team, Dr. Mosaed bin Hamoud Al-Hamza, vascular surgery consultant at King Saud University Medical City and general supervisor of the study in the Kingdom, said: “The research was based on the findings of survey studies at the beginning of the pandemic, which showed that some infected cases were exposed to arterial and venous clots that lead to severe complications.”
He added that the results of the newest study might lead to a change in treatment protocols for some COVID-19 patients, specifically people hospitalized due to a lack of oxygen.


Who’s Who: Anas Al-Oqalaa, vice governor at Saudi Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority

Who’s Who: Anas Al-Oqalaa, vice governor at Saudi Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority
Updated 28 October 2021

Who’s Who: Anas Al-Oqalaa, vice governor at Saudi Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority

Who’s Who: Anas Al-Oqalaa, vice governor at Saudi Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority

Anas Al-Oqalaa was recently named vice governor of legal and enforcement at the Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority.

Al-Oqalaa is a tenacious legal professional with a wealth of expertise acquired through providing legal counsel and management as part of regulatory compliance strategies.

He is also considered a legal expert in drafting legislation specializing in direct and indirect taxes, and capital markets laws. Through tenure, he has acquired an excellent working knowledge of commercial, tax and capital markets laws, and regulations.

Al-Oqalaa has 17 years’ experience in the industry, and has proven leadership skills in building and managing teams for more than 10 years. He possesses a reputation as a leader in his area of specialization.

As an experienced lawyer and legal professional who has worked in the public and private sectors, Al-Oqalaa built robust knowledge in different areas including real estate, economic and financial laws, and regulations.

Al-Oqalaa served in different roles at the Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority including deputy governor for legal affairs from October 2018 to October 2021 and general manager of the legal and compliance department from November 2017 to October 2018.

Before that, he served as the general counsel at the National Housing Co. from April 2017 to November 2017, and the general legal counsel and board secretary at the Middle East Financial Investment Co. from September 2015 to April 2017.

He also held different positions at the Capital Market Authority including head of the listed companies violations department from January 2014 to August 2015, head of investment funds and offering violations department from December 2013 to July 2014, and legal counsel from November 2006 to December 2013.

Before that, he worked as a lawyer in local law firms. Al-Oqalaa also leads and is a member of several committees and programs.

He received a master’s degree in corporate and commercial law from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and a bachelor’s degree in law from King Saud University.

Al-Oqalaa also holds several certificates in areas related to law, leadership, investment and accounting.


DiplomaticQuarter: Peruvian envoy praises rich heritage of Riyadh library

DiplomaticQuarter: Peruvian envoy praises rich heritage of Riyadh library
Updated 28 October 2021

DiplomaticQuarter: Peruvian envoy praises rich heritage of Riyadh library

DiplomaticQuarter: Peruvian envoy praises rich heritage of Riyadh library

RIYADH: Ambassador of Peru José Luis Salinas Montes praised the great scientific and cultural patrimony of Riyadh’s King Fahd National Library in a recent visit.
In a statement on its Facebook page, the Peruvian Embassy said: “On Oct. 25, Peru’s ambassador to Saudi Arabia delivered to the secretary-general of the King Fahd National Library a set of works representing our culture and discussed the possibilities of cultural cooperation with that institution.
“Our Saudi friends will now be able to learn a little more about Peru and its literary, artistic and intellectual heritage. Culture is the best way to bring peoples closer together and strengthen bonds of friendship,” it added.
The library’s Secretary-General Dr. Mansour A. Al-Zamil, who recently received the Peruvian ambassador and his accompanying delegation, said that the King Fahd National Library is an important destination for ambassadors to learn about the history and culture of Saudi Arabia.
Throughout the tour, the ambassador learned about the library’s goals and cultural and scientific activities. He also visited the exhibition of national documents and paintings by Saudi artists, as well as the public halls, studies department, reference services, and Kingdom Information Center.
At the end of the visit, gifts were exchanged, with Al-Zamil presenting the ambassador with a commemorative shield and some publications.


Saudi Arabia elected chair of FAO’s commission on regional fisheries

Saudi Arabia elected chair of FAO’s commission on regional fisheries
Updated 28 October 2021

Saudi Arabia elected chair of FAO’s commission on regional fisheries

Saudi Arabia elected chair of FAO’s commission on regional fisheries

RIYADH: The Regional Commission for Fisheries of the Food and Agriculture Organization has elected Saudi Arabia as chair of the eleventh session, for three years, by unanimous vote.

The Kingdom is represented in the RECOFI by Dr. Ali Al-Sheikhi, CEO of the National Fisheries Development Program. He also serves as director general of the General Department of Fisheries at the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture, and as president-elect of RECOFI.

The Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture said that the Kingdom’s election came due to its prominent role — regionally and globally — in the fishing industry and its efforts to protect the environment, and preserve the sustainability of natural and marine resources.

It said that RECOFI aims to encourage the development, conservation, management, best use of living marine resources and the sustainable development of the aquaculture sector within its work area. It also reviews economic and social aspects of the fishing industry and recommends measures to develop natural resources.

In recent years, the efforts of the Kingdom in fishery conservation have resulted in an increase in the volume of seafood production, amounting to about 85,000 tons in fisheries and 100,000 tons in aquaculture.