Results of WFA’s first diversity, equity and inclusion census released

Results of WFA’s first diversity, equity and inclusion census released
Initial results identified key challenges around family status, age, and gender as well as ethnicity and disability. (Supplied)
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Updated 28 October 2021

Results of WFA’s first diversity, equity and inclusion census released

Results of WFA’s first diversity, equity and inclusion census released
  • Most common forms of discrimination globally were reported on the basis of age and family status

DUBAI: The initial results of the first census on diversity, equity and inclusion initiated by the World Federation of Advertisers to assess diversity challenges facing the marketing and advertising industry have been released.

Initial results identified key challenges around family status, age, and gender as well as ethnicity and disability.

It found clear gaps in lived experiences when these groups were compared to the industry average, both in individual markets and globally. For example, on Kantar’s Inclusion Index, which is generated by asking questions about people’s sense of belonging, the absence of discrimination, and the presence of negative behavior, men scored at 69 percent compared to women at 61 percent.
“This has been a Herculean but long-overdue effort. For the very first time, we hear and see the marketing industry in all its different facets and nuance,” said Stephan Loerke, CEO of the WFA.

Despite these serious concerns, the marketing sector still outperformed every other category analyzed by research partner Kantar, scoring an overall 64 percent on the index, ahead of the next highest sector, health and pharmaceuticals, on 60 percent.

The research effort was led by the WFA in close collaboration with agency associations including the European Association of Communication Agencies, Voxcomm, Cannes Lions, Advertising Week, The Effies, GlobalWebIndex, Campaign, the International Advertising Association and Kantar.

The most common forms of discrimination identified by the survey were family, status and age, with 27 percent agreeing that their company does not treat all employees fairly regardless of family status and 27 percent agreeing that their company does not treat all employees equally regardless of age. Thirty-six percent of respondents agreed that age can hinder one’s career, while 40 percent of women agreed that family status could hinder one’s career.

These statistics reflect a key finding from the census: Women’s experiences are notably poorer than men’s. There is also strong evidence of a gender pay gap in some markets. In the US and Canada, for example, the gap is worst among industry starters, with a 13 percent gap in the US and a 20 percent gap in Canada.

There were similar findings for ethnic minorities, who scored lower on key sentiments, such as “I feel like I belong at my company,” than ethnic majority groups in nearly all markets. In the US, 17 percent said they faced discrimination based on their racial background. In a number of markets, this was also reflected by a pay gap. However, in many markets surveyed, ethnic minorities or foreign nationals reported being paid more than the ethnic majority.

In an industry struggling to find the right talent, the lack of diversity and inclusion is of grave concern, with 17 percent saying they were likely to leave their current company as a result of the lack of inclusion and/or discrimination they had experienced. Fifteen percent said they would leave the industry entirely.

The Netherlands performed best as a country on this issue, with only 9 percent saying they would find new employment within the industry.

“There is a confidence and strong sense of belonging that rings true of the marketing industry,” said Loerke.

However, there are significant minorities in all countries saying they witness negative behaviors and discrimination on account of their age, family status, gender, ethnicity, race, disability, mental health and sexuality, he added.

“No company or industry can ignore this; a line has been drawn in the sand and we now know where progress must be made. The onus on us all now is to work together to make our industry fairer, more diverse and more inclusive — and to measure our common progress in a second wave in the spring of 2023,” he said.

The results are based on more than 10,000 responses from 27 markets around the world conducted from June to July 2021, with the online survey identifying not just the demographics of participants but also their sense of belonging, as well as experience of discrimination and demeaning behavior.

The full findings for each specific market will be shared later this year. The results will also feed into the work of the WFA Diversity and Inclusion Task Force as well as national action plans led by WFA national associations around the world.


Amazon cloud outage hits major websites, streaming apps

Amazon drivers cheer as they go back to their their delivery vans, as their logistics systems is announced to be back online at the Amazon Delivery Station in Rosemead, Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. (AP)
Amazon drivers cheer as they go back to their their delivery vans, as their logistics systems is announced to be back online at the Amazon Delivery Station in Rosemead, Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. (AP)
Updated 3 sec ago

Amazon cloud outage hits major websites, streaming apps

Amazon drivers cheer as they go back to their their delivery vans, as their logistics systems is announced to be back online at the Amazon Delivery Station in Rosemead, Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. (AP)
  • Amazon said the outage was related to network devices and linked to application programming interface, or API, which is a set of protocols for building and integrating application software

NEW YORK: A major outage disrupted Amazon’s cloud services on Tuesday, knocking out streaming platforms Netflix and Disney+, Robinhood, a wide range of apps and Amazon.com Inc’s e-commerce website as consumers shopped ahead of Christmas.
Amazon said it was working to resolve the issue and was making progress, but did not give an estimate when services would be fully restored.
Amazon’s Ring security cameras, mobile banking app Chime and robot vacuum cleaner maker iRobot, that use Amazon Web Services (AWS), reported issues according to their social media pages.
Trading app Robinhood and Walt Disney’s streaming service Disney+ and Netflix were also down, according to Downdetector.com.
“Netflix which runs nearly all of its infrastructure on AWS appears to have lost 26 percent of its traffic,” Doug Madory, head of Internet analysis at analytics firm Kentik, said.
Amazon said the outage was related to network devices and linked to application programming interface, or API, which is a set of protocols for building and integrating application software.
“This issue is also affecting some of our monitoring and incident response tooling, which is delaying our ability to provide updates,” the company said on its status dashboard https://status.aws.amazon.com.
Downdetector.com showed more than 24,000 incidents of people reporting issues with Amazon, including its namesake e-commerce website, Prime Video and other services. The outage tracking website collates status reports from a number of sources, including user-submitted errors on its platform.
Users began reporting issues around 10:40 a.m. ET on Tuesday and the outage might be affecting a larger number of users.
Amazon has experienced 27 outages over the past 12 months related to its services, according to web tool reviewing website ToolTester.
In June, websites including Reddit, Amazon, CNN, PayPal, Spotify, Al Jazeera Media Network and the New York Times were hit by a widespread hour-long outage linked to US-based content delivery network provider Fastly Inc, a smaller rival of AWS.


Anghami launches new original podcast ‘Shagaf’

Anghami launches new original podcast ‘Shagaf’
Updated 07 December 2021

Anghami launches new original podcast ‘Shagaf’

Anghami launches new original podcast ‘Shagaf’
  • Streaming platform’s latest production shares the journey of Arab women entrepreneurs

DUBAI: Audio streaming platform Anghami has launched a new original podcast, “Shagaf,” featuring Arab women entrepreneurs from the fields of business and technology.

The show is hosted by female entrepreneur Emon Shakoor, who is the founder and CEO of Blossom Accelerator, Saudi Arabia’s first female-focused accelerator. “As an entrepreneur running an accelerator with a focus on women, empowering female founders is what I strive for,” said Shakoor.

The weekly podcast’s guests include Yara Ghouth, founder of online marketplace Naseej Market, and designer Nasibah Hafiz, who has her own fashion brand, among others.

Shakoor added that working with Anghami on the podcast is a “great way to get our literal voices heard” and share the realities of starting a business. “We want to share real stories with real women,” she added.

In Saudi Arabia, 67 percent of podcast listeners tuned in at least once a week, 30 percent of them listened to podcasts on a daily basis, while 22 percent did so three times a week, according to a report by podcast network Rising Giants Network.

The report also found that Anghami was growing in popularity in the Kingdom with 32 percent of those questioned saying it was their favorite platform.

“Podcast consumption is growing fast in MENA (the Middle East and North Africa),” said Zeina Tabbara, Anghami’s podcast lead.

“We’re developing podcasts in key categories such as lifestyle, sports, and tech (and are) truly excited to work with Emon who is passionate about the startup landscape in Saudi and MENA,” she added.

“Shagaf” is part of a bigger series of podcasts that Anghami aims to produce and stream, the company said in a statement.

The show is now available to stream on Anghami with new episodes dropping every Sunday.


Al-Hokair partners with dentsu’s Merkle in Saudi Arabia

Al-Hokair partners with dentsu’s Merkle in Saudi Arabia
Updated 07 December 2021

Al-Hokair partners with dentsu’s Merkle in Saudi Arabia

Al-Hokair partners with dentsu’s Merkle in Saudi Arabia
  • Merkle will offer performance media services for retail giant’s brands

DUBAI: Merkle Saudi Arabia, public relations firm dentsu’s data-driven customer experience management company, has been selected by Al-Hokair to deliver its performance marketing strategy across its fashion, beauty, and sport retail brands including Decathlon, Aldo, Gap, and Flormar in the Kingdom.

Merkle was selected after a competitive pitch in a bid to consolidate performance marketing for Al-Hokair’s retail arm with a scalable strategy and an overarching account structure, while still maintaining the requirements for individual brands under the group.

Hassan Al-Redha, head of marketing for Al-Hokair Fashion Retail, said: “We were looking for a new agency partner to deliver across all performance marketing capabilities, consolidating our pay-per-click, social, and digital media efforts across numerous distinct brands.

“Merkle’s approach is helping us to integrate our tools and augment our data assets, delivering people-based insights that will ultimately lead to more meaningful customer engagement across all touchpoints,” he added.

The agency’s remit is to deliver personalization through performance marketing and granular feed management for the premium franchise retailer across various categories including women’s wear, menswear, children and baby goods, shoes and accessories, cosmetics, food and beverages, and sports and entertainment.

Vimal Badiani, head of Merkle in the Middle East and North Africa region, said: “We are looking forward to leveraging our expertise in customer experience management to support its (Al-Hokair’s) objective of targeting audiences more efficiently and effectively by delivering personalization at scale.”


Instagram reveals new features to protect teens and support parents online

Instagram reveals new features to protect teens and support parents online
Updated 07 December 2021

Instagram reveals new features to protect teens and support parents online

Instagram reveals new features to protect teens and support parents online
  • Move comes after the social media platform came under scrutiny

DUBAI: Instagram has announced new additions to its safety features for teens, which will be rolled out next year.

The move comes after the social media platform came under scrutiny following research that was revealed by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen on how the platform affects teens.

The leaked research documents showed that 32 percent of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse; 13.5 percent of teen girls said Instagram makes thoughts of suicide worse and 17 percent of teen girls said Instagram makes eating disorders worse.

Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, wrote in a blog post: “Every day I see the positive impact that Instagram has for young people everywhere. I’m proud that our platform is a place where teens can spend time with the people they care about, explore their interests, and explore who they are.

“I want to make sure that it stays that way, which means above all keeping them safe on Instagram.”

The new features seek to implement tighter controls on what is recommended to teens, barring people from tagging or mentioning teens who don’t follow them, nudging teens towards different topics if they’ve been dwelling on one topic for a long time, and tightening controls on search, explore, hashtags and suggested accounts recommendations. Teens will also be able to bulk delete content they have posted.

The new features aim to help parents to be more involved in their teens’ Instagram experience, starting March 2022, Mosseri said. Instagram has created an educational hub for parents and guardians, which will include additional resources, such as product tutorials and tips from experts, to help them discuss social media use with their teens.

In addition, Instagram is piloting a tool that will give teens the option to notify their parents if they report someone, thereby providing their parents the opportunity to talk about it with them.

Mosseri announced the launch of “Take a Break,” a new feature for teens, in US, UK, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. It is not being launched in the Middle East currently but will be introduced later as part of a phased rollout.

If someone has been scrolling for a certain amount of time, Instagram will ask them to “take a break” from the platform and suggest that they set reminders to take more breaks in the future. Instagram said early test results seem to be promising with 90 percent of teens keeping the reminders on once they set them.

“As always, I’m grateful to the experts and researchers who lend us their expertise in critical areas like child development, teen mental health and online safety, and I continue to welcome productive collaboration with lawmakers and policymakers on our shared goal of creating an online world that both benefits and protects many generations to come,” Mosseri said.


Rohingya refugees sue Facebook for $150 billion over Myanmar violence

Rohingya Muslim children refugees, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait squashed against each other to receive food handouts at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh on Oct. 21, 2017. (AP)
Rohingya Muslim children refugees, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait squashed against each other to receive food handouts at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh on Oct. 21, 2017. (AP)
Updated 07 December 2021

Rohingya refugees sue Facebook for $150 billion over Myanmar violence

Rohingya Muslim children refugees, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait squashed against each other to receive food handouts at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh on Oct. 21, 2017. (AP)
  • Facebook has said it is protected from liability over content posted by users by a US Internet law known as Section 230, which holds that online platforms are not liable for content posted by third parties

CALIFORNIA: Rohingya refugees from Myanmar are suing Meta Platforms Inc, formerly known as Facebook, for $150 billion over allegations that the social media company did not take action against anti-Rohingya hate speech that contributed to violence.
A US class-action complaint, filed in California on Monday by law firms Edelson PC and Fields PLLC, argues that the company’s failures to police content and its platform’s design contributed to real-world violence faced by the Rohingya community. In a coordinated action, British lawyers also submitted a letter of notice to Facebook’s London office.
Facebook did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment about the lawsuit. The company has said it was “too slow to prevent misinformation and hate” in Myanmar and has said it has since taken steps to crack down on platform abuses in the region, including banning the military from Facebook and Instagram after the Feb. 1 coup.
Facebook has said it is protected from liability over content posted by users by a US Internet law known as Section 230, which holds that online platforms are not liable for content posted by third parties. The complaint says it seeks to apply Burmese law to the claims if Section 230 is raised as a defense.
Although US courts can apply foreign law to cases where the alleged harms and activity by companies took place in other countries, two legal experts interviewed by Reuters said they did not know of a successful precedent for foreign law being invoked in lawsuits against social media companies where Section 230 protections could apply.
Anupam Chander, a professor at Georgetown University Law Center, said that invoking Burmese law wasn’t “inappropriate.” But he predicted that “It’s unlikely to be successful,” saying that “It would be odd for Congress to have foreclosed actions under US law but permitted them to proceed under foreign law.”
More than 730,000 Rohingya Muslims fled Myanmar’s Rakhine state in August 2017 after a military crackdown that refugees said included mass killings and rape. Rights groups documented killings of civilians and burning of villages.
Myanmar authorities say they were battling an insurgency and deny carrying out systematic atrocities.
In 2018, UN human rights investigators said the use of Facebook had played a key role in spreading hate speech that fueled the violence. A Reuters investigation https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/myanmar-facebook-hate that year, cited in the US complaint, found more than 1,000 examples of posts, comments and images attacking the Rohingya and other Muslims on Facebook.
The International Criminal Court has opened a case into the accusations of crimes in the region. In September, a US federal judge ordered Facebook to release records of accounts connected to anti-Rohingya violence in Myanmar that the social media giant had shut down.
The new class-action lawsuit references claims by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, who leaked a cache https://www.reuters.com/technology/facebook-whistleblower-says-transparency-needed-fix-social-media-ills-2021-12-03 of internal documents this year, that the company does not police abusive content in countries where such speech is likely to cause the most harm.
The complaint also cites recent media reports, including a Reuters report https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/information-combat-inside-fight-myanmars-soul-2021-11-01 last month, that Myanmar’s military was using fake social media accounts to engage in what is widely referred to in the military as “information combat.”