Bahrain’s King Hamad invites Pope Francis to visit Manama

Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
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Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
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Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
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Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
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Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
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Updated 26 November 2021

Bahrain’s King Hamad invites Pope Francis to visit Manama

Pope Francis receives Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, adviser for diplomatic affairs to Bahrain’s King Hamad, at the Vatican. (BNA)
  • Pope Francis thanked King Hamad for the invitation to visit Bahrain

LONDON: Bahrain’s King Hamad on Thursday sent a message to Pope Francis that included an official invitation to visit the kingdom.
The message was delivered by Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed, the king’s adviser for diplomatic affairs, during a meeting with the pope at the Vatican.
Sheikh Khalid expressed King Hamad’s appreciation for the pontiff’s “pivotal and prominent role in establishing and strengthening interfaith dialogue and understanding between different cultures and civilizations, and spreading the values of human brotherhood and coexistence among all,” Bahrain News Agency reported.
He reiterated the king’s support for the Document on Human Fraternity for World Peace and Living Together, also known as the Abu Dhabi declaration, and the importance of building on it to ensure a more prosperous future for all of humanity.
Pope Francis thanked King Hamad for the invitation to visit Bahrain.
He said the invitation embodies the kingdom’s “character as a role model for openness and coexistence among all components of society,” praising King Hamad’s constant keenness to promote a culture of dialogue and tolerance, and his initiatives to spread the principles of coexistence and brotherhood among all countries and peoples.
The Abu Dhabi agreement was signed by Pope Francis on behalf of the Roman Catholic Church, and the grand imam of Egypt’s Al-Azhar in 2019 in the UAE, during the pope’s historic visit to the Arabian Peninsula.


Yemeni military commander hopeful of Marib advance after army cuts Houthi supply lines 

Yemeni military commander hopeful of Marib advance after army cuts Houthi supply lines 
Updated 7 sec ago

Yemeni military commander hopeful of Marib advance after army cuts Houthi supply lines 

Yemeni military commander hopeful of Marib advance after army cuts Houthi supply lines 

LONDON: Yemen’s military commander heading army troops in Marib Maj. Gen. Mansour Thawaba said he was hopeful of advancements in the strategic province after Houthi supply lines were cut. 

There have been “great advances” in the past two days in Bayhan, Usaylan and Harib, the major general told Al-Arabiya, noting that army forces cut the Houthis’ supply line between Bayhan and Harib.

He explained that military operations continued on all fronts, with the southern front seeing most of the action. He also noted the Saudi-led Arab coalition’s support with airstrikes. 

“Marib is not besieged, and the Houthis are far from achieving this,” he said. 

He added that most of those fighting for the Houthis were children and young men. 

“They do not care about the children of Yemenis who are killed by the dozens every day,” he said, referring to the Houthi militia. 

The coalition announced on Friday night that it had destroyed a ballistic missile launcher south of Sanaa.

The coalition added that it also destroyed a “mine-making workshop” in the capital, stressing that it had taken “preventive measures to spare civilians and civilian structures from collateral damage” during the airstrikes.


Clashes rock Arab town in Israel, alleged car-rammer killed

Clashes rock Arab town in Israel, alleged car-rammer killed
Updated 04 December 2021

Clashes rock Arab town in Israel, alleged car-rammer killed

Clashes rock Arab town in Israel, alleged car-rammer killed
  • The chaos comes amid a wave of violent crime in Israel’s Arab community that shows no sign of abating

UMM AL-FAHM, Israel: Police on Friday shot and killed a man in an Arab town in northern Israel who had allegedly been involved in a car-ramming attack that wounded two officers, Israeli officials said.
The incident capped an eruption of communal violence in Umm Al-Fahm, including armed clashes among residents. On Thursday, a man was shot and killed in the town. Israeli police and firefighters raced to the community as gunfire rang out and buildings were set ablaze.
The chaos comes amid a wave of violent crime in Israel’s Arab community that shows no sign of abating, despite far-reaching action announced in recent months by Israeli authorities.
Friday’s incident began when paramilitary Border Police opened fire on a vehicle speeding toward them, fatally shooting one man and wounding the other in the car, who was arrested after receiving medical treatment, Border Police said. They said the two officers suffered light to moderate wounds.
They said a gun and ammunition were found in the car, and that the two men were suspected of involvement in violent family disputes that have rocked Umm Al-Fahm in recent months. Authorities said the car-ramming was not politically motivated.
Arab towns across Israel have seen a major escalation in violence in recent years driven by organized crime and family feuds. At least 117 Arabs have been killed in 2021, the highest number on record, according to the Abraham Initiatives, which promotes Jewish-Arab coexistence. The crime rate among Arabs far exceeds their 20 percent share of the population.
Arab citizens of Israel have the right to vote, most speak fluent Hebrew, and they have a large presence in the country’s universities and medical profession. But they face widespread discrimination, especially with housing.
They have close familial ties to Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Gaza, and largely identify with their cause, leading many Jewish Israelis to view them with suspicion. Jewish-Arab violence erupted across Israel during the Gaza war in May.
Arab activists have long accused police of ignoring crime in their communities. Israeli officials have touted a number of initiatives in recent years, including larger budgets for law enforcement in Arab communities, but police say local leaders could do more to help them.
Israel’s current government pledged major action against crime in Arab communities in August as it announced a wave of arrests. That was a central demand of a small party that made history this year by being the first Arab faction to join a ruling coalition.
Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett expressed support for the police on Friday, calling for improved security and further dialogue with Arab leaders.


Arab coalition destroys ballistic missile launch pad in Yemen’s capital

Arab coalition destroys ballistic missile launch pad in Yemen’s capital
Updated 04 December 2021

Arab coalition destroys ballistic missile launch pad in Yemen’s capital

Arab coalition destroys ballistic missile launch pad in Yemen’s capital

RIYADH: The Arab coalition destroyed a ballistic missile launch pad and a warehouse used to build drones in Yemen’s capital, Al Ekhbariya reported on Saturday.
The coalition has carried out multiple sorties in the past few weeks to hamper Houthi militia operations in and around Sanaa.
The launch pad destruction in southern Sanaa also killed experts, the coalition said, adding that a mine-making and drone-assembly workshop was also destroyed.
The coalition said they took the necessary precautions to safeguard civilian life during the operations.
The near daily attacks by the militia on Saudi civilian infrastructure using drones has reduced considerably as the coalition has gone after specific targets behind the persistent attacks.
Experts belonging to Hezbollah and Iran’s Revolutionary Guard have been killed by the coalition airstrikes in recent weeks.
The Yemeni government is engaged in a fierce resistance in the governorate of Marib, a resource-rich region coveted by the Iran-backed group.
On Thursday, the coalition said it carried out nine operations against militia targets in Marib in the past 24 hours, killing 45 fighters and destroying six military vehicles.
Government forces also liberated a large swathe of land in the southern governorate of Shabwa on Thursday.
Backed by air cover from the Arab coalition, government troops pushed deeper into Houthi-controlled Bayhan and Ousylan districts, expelling militia fighters from wide areas and taking control of a strategic road that connects the two districts, a military official told Arab News on Thursday.
The Arab coalition has been fighting the Iran-backed Houthis, after the militia seized Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, in 2014.
In March, Saudi Arabia announced a roadmap called the Riyadh Initiative to halt fighting in Yemen and reopen Sanaa airport, as well as continuing talks to find a solution to the conflict. The proposal was seen as a welcome step internationally, but has been rejected by Houthi leadership.
The war, which has now lasted for seven years, has cost thousands of Yemenis their lives and has forced many more to depend on humanitarian assistance.
Saudi relief agency, KSrelief, has poured billions of dollars worth of aid into Yemen and has hundreds of projects focusing on food and health.
In July, The World Food Programme welcomed Saudi contributions to the fund saying humanitarian action in Yemen could not be sustained without it.


Kurdish protesters storm the chemical weapons body in The Hague

Kurdish protesters storm the chemical weapons body in The Hague
Updated 04 December 2021

Kurdish protesters storm the chemical weapons body in The Hague

Kurdish protesters storm the chemical weapons body in The Hague

THE HAGUE: Dutch police arrested 50 people on Friday after Kurdish demonstrators alleging that Turkey is using chemical weapons in northern Iraq broke into the headquarters of the global toxic arms watchdog.
Protesters got past security to enter the grounds of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in The Hague and staged a noisy rally outside the building’s front doors, AFP journalists saw.
Police dragged the demonstrators off one by one, put them on the ground and handcuffed them, before bundling them into waiting vans.
At least a dozen police vehicles sealed off the road outside the OPCW, which is opposite Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s official residence.
Several ambulances and a medical helicopter were also at the scene.
“At around noon, a large group of protesters stormed a building ... We have arrested these protesters. Several police units are present at the building,” police said on Twitter.
“The approximately 50 arrested demonstrators who were on the site have been transferred to a police location.”
Turkey denies using chemical weapons in its conflict with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party.


Libya’s foreign minister slams European migration policy

Libya’s foreign minister slams European migration policy
Updated 03 December 2021

Libya’s foreign minister slams European migration policy

Libya’s foreign minister slams European migration policy
  • Foreign Minister Najla Mangoush spoke via video call at the Mediterranean dialogues in a session titled “Dealing with Migration"
  • EU sends funds to the detention centers indirectly through aid agencies

CAIRO: Libya’s foreign minister on Friday criticized a system of deterring migrants from reaching European shores that she argued fails to address the root of the problem and has so far only served the interest of EU states.
Her comments are the latest stab at EU policies that fund forces such as the Libyan coast guard, which intercepts migrant boats and brings them back onshore and detains them.
Foreign Minister Najla Mangoush spoke via video call at the Mediterranean dialogues, a conference hosted by the Italian government, in a session titled “Dealing with Migration.”
“Please do not push the problem in our lap and please do not point your fingers at Libya and portray us as a country which abuses and disrespects refugees,” she said. “We are tired of beating around the bush, and all these superficial solutions being offered, it’s time to state the problem and face it, instead of ... keep repeating it again and again.”
The European Union, which has come under fire for its support of Libya’s domestic efforts to stem migrant crossings in the past, has supported the country’s coast guard, which regularly intercepts vessels carrying migrants. Many migrants are then placed in brutal detention facilities, held indefinitely in appalling conditions, or held for ransom in exchange for payoffs, according to migrants who have made it out.
The European Union sends funds to the detention centers indirectly through aid agencies.
In her speech, Mangoush did not directly address the abuse accusations.
Libya has emerged as the dominant transit point for migrants fleeing war and poverty in Africa and the Middle East, hoping for a better life in Europe. Each year, thousands of migrants and refugees from Africa, the Middle East and South Asia attempt the deadly Mediterranean Sea crossing to Europe on overcrowded and often unseaworthy boats.
More than 1,300 men, women and children have died so far in 2021 trying to cross the Central Mediterranean from Libya and Tunisia to Italy and Malta, according to the UN migration agency.
The EU has sent 455 million euros to Libya since 2015, largely channeled through UN agencies and aimed at beefing up Libya’s coast guard, reinforcing its southern border and improving conditions for migrants.
Libya has been at war and split for years between rival administrations in the east and west, each backed by armed groups and foreign governments. After years of UN-led talks, the country is set to hold national elections later this month.
Mangoush said that what Libya needs is better policing system at its southern borders to control the influx of migrants, to address the root of the issue. She said the solution of simply providing money to Libya would never be enough, calling past initiatives “just for the cause of serving the agenda of the EU and the perspective of the EU.”