US sanctions Iran’s Quds Force, Hezbollah

US sanctions Iran’s Quds Force, Hezbollah
A US Treasury Department report on Wednesday said that officials had facilitated the sale of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of Iranian oil for both the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Quds Force and Hezbollah. (File/AP)
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Updated 27 May 2022

US sanctions Iran’s Quds Force, Hezbollah

US sanctions Iran’s Quds Force, Hezbollah
  • The US would continue to strictly enforce sanctions on Iran’s illicit oil trade
  • Ruwan Al-Rejoleh, a MENA expert and consultant based in Washington, called the sanctions an “important step”

DUBAI: The US has designated a network run by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Quds Force an “international oil smuggling and money laundering network.”
A US Treasury Department report on Wednesday said that officials had facilitated the sale of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of Iranian oil for both the IRGC-QF and Hezbollah.
It acted as a critical element of Iran’s oil revenue generation, and supported proxy militant groups that continued to “perpetuate conflict and suffering throughout the region.”
The department’s undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, Brian Nelson, said the US would continue to strictly enforce sanctions on Iran’s illicit oil trade.
He added that similar sanctions could apply to anyone purchasing oil from Iran.
Ruwan Al-Rejoleh, a MENA expert and consultant based in Washington, called the sanctions an “important step.”
“Assisted by Hezbollah, this oil network has been allowed to operate freely for too long. This is an important step, but the administration must keep pushing Hezbollah and its allies to the margins,” she said. “Hezbollah, who control the Lebanese Energy Ministry, recently took advantage of Lebanon’s energy problems to secure preferential access to the Lebanese market for their masters in Tehran.”
She said Sonatrach, a state-owned Algerian company, had been responsible for sending fuel oil to Lebanon and that its exit had “exacerbated the country’s already crippling” energy problems.
Ghada Aoun, Mount Lebanon’s state prosecutor, launched politically motivated proceedings against Sonatrach, which caused the Algerians to leave, she added.
“Hezbollah used this chaos to secure access for Iran to Beirut’s energy market.”


Turkey to seek extradition of 33 suspects from Finland, Sweden

Turkey to seek extradition of 33 suspects from Finland, Sweden
Updated 6 sec ago

Turkey to seek extradition of 33 suspects from Finland, Sweden

Turkey to seek extradition of 33 suspects from Finland, Sweden
  • Extradition sought under a deal that paved the way for Ankara to back the Nordic countries’ NATO membership bids
ITANBUL: Turkey said Wednesday it would seek the extradition of 33 “terror” suspects from Sweden and Finland under a deal that paved the way for Ankara to back the Nordic countries’ NATO membership bids.
“We will seek the extradition of terrorists from the relevant countries within the framework of the new agreement,” signed on Tuesday by the foreign ministers of Turkey, Sweden and Finland, Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag was quoted as saying by NTV television.

Israel accuses Hezbollah of trying to hack UN Lebanon peacekeepers

Israel accuses Hezbollah of trying to hack UN Lebanon peacekeepers
Israel has accused Hezbollah gunmen of setting up clandestine positions at the border in defiance of UNIFIL. (File/AFP)
Updated 21 min 22 sec ago

Israel accuses Hezbollah of trying to hack UN Lebanon peacekeepers

Israel accuses Hezbollah of trying to hack UN Lebanon peacekeepers
  • The allegation — to which there was no immediate response from Beirut, Tehran or the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) — came as Israeli-Iranian tensions soar

JERUSALEM: Israel accused the Iranian-backed Lebanese militia Hezbollah on Wednesday of conducting a cyber operation designed to disrupt a UN peacekeeping mission on the border between the countries, and threatened harsh Israeli retaliation against enemy hackers.
The allegation — to which there was no immediate response from Beirut, Tehran or the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) — came as Israeli-Iranian tensions soar.
In what he termed a first public disclosure of the incident, Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz said “Iranian security institutions in cooperation with Hezbollah (recently) launched a cyber operation with the aim of stealing materials about UNIFIL activities and deployment in the area, for Hezbollah’s use.”
“This is yet another direct attack by Iran and Hezbollah on Lebanese citizens and on Lebanon’s stability,” he told a cyber conference at Tel Aviv University, without elaborating.
Established in 1978, UNIFIL patrols Lebanon’s southern border. It is charged with monitoring the ceasefire that ended the last war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006.
Israel has accused Hezbollah gunmen of setting up clandestine positions at the border in defiance of UNIFIL. Lebanese officials say Israel continues air force overflights of their territory in violation of the cease-fire.
Gantz said an Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps cyber unit called “Shahid Kaveh” had “conducted research to damage ships, gas stations and industrial plants in several Western countries including Britain, the US, France and Israel.”
Britain’s Sky News reported similar allegations last year, saying the Iranian embassy in London had not responded to them.
Gantz hinted that Israel — which is widely believed to have waged cyber war against Iran’s nuclear facilities and other infrastructure — may retaliate physically against enemy hackers.
“We know who they are, we target them and those who direct them. They are in our sights as we speak — and not just in the cyber-space,” he said. “There is a variety of possible responses to cyber-attacks — in and outside of the cyber-domain.”


Israel’s Knesset set to dissolve by midnight triggering snap election

Israel’s Knesset set to dissolve by midnight triggering snap election
Updated 29 June 2022

Israel’s Knesset set to dissolve by midnight triggering snap election

Israel’s Knesset set to dissolve by midnight triggering snap election
  • The Knesset set a deadline for midnight on Wednesday for a final vote to dissolve
  • Foreign minister Yair Lapid will take over as prime minister of a caretaker government

JERUSALEM: Israel was headed on Wednesday toward its fifth election in less than four years, plunging it deeper into political uncertainty as it grapples with rising living costs and renewed international efforts to revive a nuclear deal with Iran.
Prime Minister Naftali Bennett moved last week to dissolve parliament after infighting made his ruling coalition no longer tenable. The Knesset set a deadline for midnight on Wednesday for a final vote to dissolve.
Once the calling of a snap election gets the Knesset’s final approval, Israel’s center-left foreign minister, Yair Lapid, will take over from Bennett as prime minister of a caretaker government with limited powers.
But even with lawmakers grappling over the exact election date, either Oct. 25 or Nov. 1, the campaign has already become dominated by the possible comeback of former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Lapid and Bennett ended Netanyahu’s record reign a year ago by forming a rare alliance of rightists, liberals and Arab parties, which lasted longer than many expected but faltered in recent amid infighting.
Netanyahu, now opposition leader, has been delighted by the end of what he has called the worst government in Israel’s history. He hopes to win a sixth term in office despite being on trial for corruption on charges he denies.
Surveys have shown his right-wing Likud party leading the polls but still short of a governing majority despite support of allied religious and nationalist parties.
Lawmakers from the pro-Netanyahu bloc have said they were working to form a new government before parliament dissolves. That scenario, which appears remote, would scupper an early election.


Palestinian killed by Israel army in West Bank: Palestinians

Palestinian killed by Israel army in West Bank: Palestinians
Updated 29 June 2022

Palestinian killed by Israel army in West Bank: Palestinians

Palestinian killed by Israel army in West Bank: Palestinians
  • The Palestinians’ official Wafa news agency said he was killed during an Israeli raid in the town

RAMALLAH, Palestinian Territories: Israeli troops shot dead a Palestinian early Wednesday during clashes in the hotspot town of Jenin in the occupied West Bank, Palestinian and Israeli officials said.
Mohammad Marei, 25, died from a bullet wound to the chest, the Palestinian health ministry said. The Palestinians’ official Wafa news agency said he was killed during an Israeli raid in the town.
The Israeli army said it conducted overnight “counter-terrorism activities” in several West Bank locations.
In Jenin, Palestinian gunmen opened fire on troops, the army said.
“A number of suspects also hurled explosive devices at soldiers, who responded with fire. A hit was identified,” the army added, without specifically commenting on Marei’s death.
His killing comes amid spiralling violence in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Nineteen people — mostly Israeli civilians inside Israel — have been killed since late March, mainly in attacks by Palestinians and Israeli Arabs.
Israeli security forces have responded with near-daily raids in the West Bank, including in and around Jenin.
Forty-eight Palestinians have been killed, mostly in the West Bank — among them attackers and suspected militants but also non-combatants, including Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, who was killed by Israeli army fire while covering a raid in Jenin, according to the United Nations.
Three Israeli Arab attackers have also been killed since late March.


Former student held after two Iraq professors killed

Police believe the shooter did not originally intend to kill the engineering professor. (AFP)
Police believe the shooter did not originally intend to kill the engineering professor. (AFP)
Updated 29 June 2022

Former student held after two Iraq professors killed

Police believe the shooter did not originally intend to kill the engineering professor. (AFP)
  • The suspect was expelled from Soran University by the first victim’s wife and was then refused a place at Salaheddin University by the second victim, the governor said

IRBIL, Iraq: Two Iraqi university professors were gunned down in the Kurdish regional capital Irbil on Tuesday prompting the arrest of a disgruntled former student, authorities said.
Shootings as a means of settling scores are far from rare in Iraq — its legacy of war and sectarian conflict mean the country’s 40 million people count some 7.6 million firearms, according to figures from the Small Arms Survey.
A Soran University engineering professor was shot dead in his home in the early hours, and the dean of the Salaheddin University law faculty, Kawan Ismail, was killed on campus shortly afterwards, provincial governor Omed Khoshnaw told reporters.
Police believe the shooter did not originally intend to kill the engineering professor, but rather his wife, who is a law professor at the same university and was away from home at the time, Khosnaw said.
The suspect was expelled from Soran University by the first victim’s wife and was then refused a place at Salaheddin University by the second victim, the governor said.
He had been arrested several times previously after making death threats against the second victim, whose bodyguard was also wounded in the attack.