G7 summit kicks off under shadow of Ukraine war, stagflation risk

US President Joe Biden, center right, after his arrival at Franz-Josef-Strauss Airport near Munich, Germany, Saturday, June 25, 2022, ahead of the G7 summit. (AP)
US President Joe Biden, center right, after his arrival at Franz-Josef-Strauss Airport near Munich, Germany, Saturday, June 25, 2022, ahead of the G7 summit. (AP)
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Updated 26 June 2022

G7 summit kicks off under shadow of Ukraine war, stagflation risk

 US President Joe Biden, center right, after his arrival at Franz-Josef-Strauss Airport near Munich, Germany, on Saturday.
  • The G7 partners are set to agree to ban imports of gold from Russia, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters
  • The G7 leaders are also expected to discuss options for tackling rising energy prices and replacing Russian oil and gas imports

SCHLOSS ELMAU, Germany: German Chancellor Olaf Scholz welcomes leaders of the Group of Seven rich democracies on Sunday to a three-day summit in the Bavarian Alps overshadowed by the war in Ukraine and its far-reaching consequences, from energy shortages to a food crisis.
The summit takes place against a darker backdrop than last year when the British, Canadian, French, German, Italian, Japanese and US leaders met for the first time since before the COVID-19 pandemic and vowed to build back better.
Soaring global energy and food prices are hitting economic growth in the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.
The United Nations warned on Friday of an “unprecedented global hunger crisis.”
Climate change, an increasingly assertive China and the rise of authoritarianism are also set to be on the agenda.
The G7 leaders are expected to seek to show a united front on supporting Ukraine for as long as necessary and cranking up pressure on the Kremlin — although they will want to avoid sanctions that could stoke inflation and exacerbate the cost-of-living crisis affecting their own people.
“The main message from the G7 will be unity and coordination of action... That’s the main message, that even through difficult times... we stick to our alliance,” an EU official said.
The G7 partners are set to agree to ban imports of gold from Russia, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters. A German government source later said that leaders were having “really constructive” conversations on a possible price cap on Russian oil imports.
The G7 leaders are also expected to discuss options for tackling rising energy prices and replacing Russian oil and gas imports.
The summit takes place at the castle resort of Schloss Elmau at the foot of Germany’s highest mountain, the Zugspitze — the same venue as when the country last hosted the G7 annual meet-up in 2015. Then too, Russian aggression against Ukraine dominated the agenda a year after Moscow’s invasion of Crimea.
The summit is also a chance for Scholz to capitalize on being the host by displaying more assertive leadership on the Ukraine crisis.
The chancellor vowed a revolution in German foreign and defense policy after Russia’s invasion in February, promising to bolster the military with a 100 billion euro fund and send weapons to Ukraine.
But critics have since charged him with foot-dragging and sending mixed messages by warning that Russia might perceive NATO as a war party and highlighting the risk of nuclear war.
The G7 was founded in 1975 as a forum for the richest nations to discuss crises such as the OPEC oil embargo.
It became the G8 after Russia was admitted six years after the fall of the Soviet Union. But Moscow was suspended in 2014 after it annexed Crimea from Ukraine.

GLOBAL PARTNERS
This year, Scholz has invited as partner countries Senegal, currently chairing the African Union, Argentina, currently heading the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, as well as Indonesia and India, the current and next hosts of the G20 group of large industrial nations, as well as South Africa.
“The summit must send not only the message that NATO and the G7 are more united than ever, but also that the democracies of the world stand together against Putin’s imperialism just as they do in the fight against hunger and poverty,” Scholz told the German parliament this week.
Many countries of the global south are concerned about the collateral damage from western sanctions.
An EU official said G7 countries would impress upon the partner countries that food price spikes hitting them were the result of Russia’s actions and that there were no sanctions targeting food. It was also a mistake to think of the Ukraine war as a local matter.
“It’s more than this. It’s questioning the order, the post Second World War order,” the official said.


Australian government gears up Syrian prison rescue plan

Australian government gears up Syrian prison rescue plan
Updated 6 sec ago

Australian government gears up Syrian prison rescue plan

Australian government gears up Syrian prison rescue plan
  • Women, children suffer malnutrition, frostbite, violence in northeastern Syrian camps

LONDON: The Australian government is set to rescue dozens of Australian women and children detained in Syrian prison camps, the Guardian reported.

More than 20 Australian women and at least 40 children are stuck in the Al-Hol and Al-Roj camps in northeastern Syria. The camps, being managed by the Syrian Democratic Forces, hold the wives, widows, and children of Daesh fighters defeated by the US-led coalition in Iraq and Syria.

Many of their husbands have been killed by the coalition and its partners in the region, and some have been jailed. Canberra is now set to recover more than 20 of those still in the region. The dozens set to be repatriated will be mostly children, but officials told the Guardian that the rescue operation would take several months.

Most of the children are aged under six and several were born in the camps to widowed wives of the fighters.

The next mission will be the first time that the Australian government has attempted to repatriate citizens from the camps since 2019, when it launched a secret rescue operation to recover eight orphans, including a pregnant teenager.

The government has consistently claimed that security risks prevented any fresh attempts, but government sources told the Guardian that a rescue mission was now on the way.

A spokesperson for Clare O’Neil, Australia’s home affairs minister, told Guardian Australia on Sunday: “The Australian government’s overriding priority is the protection of Australians and Australia’s national interest, informed by national security advice. Given the sensitive nature of the matters involved, it would not be appropriate to comment further.”

Forty-four children and several Australian widows are held in Al-Roj camp, which is closer to the Iraqi border than the more dangerous Al-Hol camp, where shootings have taken place and illness is rife. More than 100 murders were reported in Al-Hol camp in the 18 months leading up to June.

The SDF, a predominantly Kurdish force, last month arrested more than 300 Daesh fighters inside the camp. Its troops seized weapons and freed at least six women who were living as slaves, chained under the control of their captors. One of the women had been living in captivity since 2014, when she was just nine years old.

The Australian push to repatriate citizens comes after several other Western nations adopted similar plans.

The Guardian said that Germany had repatriated 91 citizens, France, 86, and the US, 26. Kazakhstan had recovered 700 of its citizens, with Russia and Kosovo both repatriating more than 200 each.

The US has urged Canberra to conduct repatriations amid reports of troubling conditions that the children have endured. In July, Sydney-born teenager Yusuf Zahab died of unknown causes. He had tuberculosis and was begging for support in January amid Daesh attacks on a prison. He was aged 11 when taken to Syria against his will by his family, of which a dozen joined Daesh.

Reports of malnutrition and frostbite suffered by Australian children were heard in 2020, and 2021.

UN experts said plans to repatriate women and children were “entirely feasible.”

In a joint statement, they said: “The government of Australia has the capacity to do so. Many other governments are currently doing it. Australia has an advanced child welfare, education, criminal justice, and health system which is eminently capable of addressing the needs of these children and their mothers.

“Failure to repatriate is an abdication of Australia’s treaty obligations and their deeper moral obligations to protect Australia’s most vulnerable children.”

Peter Maurer, president of the International Committee of the Red Cross, told the Guardian that “appallingly harsh conditions” in Al-Hol were worsening.

“The children here have less food, clean water, health care, and education than international standards call for. They are endlessly exposed to dangers, and their rights are ignored. A lack of attention is not an excuse to forget the women and children here.

“We welcome the efforts that have been made to repatriate women and children back to their home countries. But this camp remains the shame of the international community,” he said.


Swiss police violently disperse anti-Iran protest at embassy

Swiss police violently disperse anti-Iran protest at embassy
Updated 8 min 26 sec ago

Swiss police violently disperse anti-Iran protest at embassy

Swiss police violently disperse anti-Iran protest at embassy
  • Two men climbed over the embassy’s fence, in Bern, and pulled down the Iranian flag
  • Police said they used rubber bullets after several other protesters tried to follow the two men

BERLIN: Swiss police used rubber bullets to disperse protesters in front of the Iranian Embassy in Bern after two men climbed over the embassy’s fence and pulled down the Iranian flag from a flagpole in the yard.
Police said late Saturday that nobody was injured and that the “large crowd” of protesters was dispersed after the use of rubber bullets. The two protesters who entered the embassy’s grounds were detained, according to police in the Swiss capital.
Police said they used rubber bullets after several other protesters at the unauthorized demonstration tried following the two men who had first entered the embassy’s yard and also attempted to access the premises.
It wasn’t immediately clear if more protesters were detained.
Thousands of Iranians have taken to the streets over the last two weeks in protests over the death of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman who had been detained by the morality police in the capital, Tehran, for allegedly wearing her mandatory Islamic headscarf too loosely.
Outside of Iran, thousands of protesters have also staged demonstrations in European countries and elsewhere over the death of Amini. They’ve also expressed anger over the treatment of women and wider repression in the Islamic Republic.


King Charles III won’t attend COP27, Buckingham Palace confirms

King Charles III won’t attend COP27, Buckingham Palace confirms
Updated 23 min 9 sec ago

King Charles III won’t attend COP27, Buckingham Palace confirms

King Charles III won’t attend COP27, Buckingham Palace confirms
  • Had been talks over whether Charles could play a role in the climate conference in a different way

LONDON: King Charles III will not travel to next month’s COP27 climate summit in Egypt, Buckingham Palace has confirmed.

A report released late on Saturday said the decision came after UK Prime Minister Liz Truss “objected” to the avid environmentalist monarch attending.

Britain’s new monarch, who took the throne after his mother Queen Elizabeth II died last month, had intended to deliver a speech at the November 6-18 gathering, the Sunday Times reported.

But the plan was reportedly axed after Truss opposed it during a personal audience with Charles at Buckingham Palace last month and on the advice of Number 10 advisers.

However, Sky News reported that palace sources said any suggestion of disagreement between the new monarch and prime minister was “categorically untrue” and that the decision was “agreed in consultation.”

A Number 10 source told Sky News: “The idea the prime minister gives orders to the King is ridiculous.”

And according to the Sky report, there have been talks over whether Charles could play a role in the climate conference in a different way.

The decision comes amid speculation Britain’s new leader, already under fire over her economic plans which have sparked market turmoil, could controversially scale back the country’s climate change commitments.

Her newly assembled cabinet contains a number of ministers who have expressed skepticism about the so-called 2050 net zero goals, while Truss herself is seen as less enthusiastic about the policy than predecessor Boris Johnson.

The Sunday Times said she is unlikely to attend COP27 — the 27th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) — at the Egyptian resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Britain hosted the last summit in the Scottish city Glasgow, when Charles, the late queen and his son William all addressed the event.

The newspaper said the episode was “likely to fuel tensions” between Charles and Truss, but cited a government source who claimed the audience had been “cordial” and there had “not been a row.”

Meanwhile, a royal source told the paper: “It is no mystery that the king was invited to go there.

“He had to think very carefully about what steps to take for his first overseas tour, and he is not going to be attending COP(27).”

Both Downing Street and Buckingham Palace declined to comment on the Times report.

Under convention in Britain, all overseas official visits by members of the royal family are undertaken in accordance with advice from the government.

However, despite not attending in person, reports said the king still hopes to be able to contribute in some form to the conference.

Charles III is a committed environmentalist with a long history of campaigning for better conservation, organic farming and tackling climate change.

* With AFP


Stampede at Indonesian football match leaves nearly 200 dead

Stampede at Indonesian football match leaves nearly 200 dead
Updated 02 October 2022

Stampede at Indonesian football match leaves nearly 200 dead

Stampede at Indonesian football match leaves nearly 200 dead
  • Rights groups call for investigation as Indonesia set to host FIFA U-20 World Cup
  • Stampede occurred after police used tear gas to control crowd

JAKARTA: Nearly 200 people were killed when violence broke out after a local league football match in East Java, authorities said on Sunday, in what appears to be the worst stadium disaster in half a century.

Frustrated supporters of Arema football club rushed onto the field at Kanjuruhan Stadium in Malang city after their team lost 2-3 to visiting Persebaya Surabaya on Saturday night.

The death toll has been rapidly rising since early Sunday when police recorded 129 deaths.

“This number increased to 174 people who have died, according to 10:30 a.m. data gathered by the regional disaster management agency in East Java,” East Java Deputy Gov. Emil Dardak told local media.

The real figure is likely to be higher. Volunteers from the local community have launched a campaign to identify the victims, checking households for missing persons as many teenage fans had no identification documents.

Soccer fans carry an injured man following clashes during a soccer match at Kanjuruhan Stadium in Malang, Indonesia, on Oct. 1, 2022. (AP Photo) 

The stampede occurred as fans rushed into an exit gate as police tried to control the crowd with tear gas.

“We used tear gas. It had gotten anarchic. They started attacking officers, they damaged cars,” East Java police chief Nico Afinta told reporters.

Footage circulated on social media showed scuffling between football fans and officers in riot gear, while others scaled a fence when they tried to flee the clouds of tear gas.

Indonesia’s chief security minister, Mahfud MD, said the stadium had been filled beyond its capacity, with 42,000 tickets sold for an arena that could accommodate only 38,000 people.

“Most of the victims had died because it was crowded, there was jostling, and some were trampled and had suffocated,” he said in an Instagram post.

Officers examine a damaged police vehicle following a clash between supporters of two Indonesian soccer teams at Kanjuruhan Stadium in Malang, Indonesia, on Oct. 1, 2022. (AP)

President Joko Widodo ordered a thorough investigation into the incident and ordered the Football Association of Indonesia to suspend all games in the Indonesian top league BRI Liga 1, until the probe has been completed.

“I regret that this tragedy occurred,” he said in a televised speech. “I hope this is the last football tragedy in the country.”

The Indonesian stadium disaster was one of the worst in the history of football and the deadliest in more than five decades. In 1964, violence that broke out at the Estadio Nacional in Lima, Peru, left 328 people dead.

The incident and police response to it may deal a blow to Indonesia’s plans to host the FIFA Under-20 World Cup next year, and its bid to stage the Asian Cup, also in 2023, after China pulled out as host.

Rights groups are blaming the high death toll from Saturday’s match on the use of tear gas by police.

“It’s clear that the use of tear gas is prohibited by FIFA. FIFA in article 19 of its stadium safety and security regulations stressed that the use of tear gas or firearms are prohibited for crowd control in stadiums,” the Indonesian Legal Aid Foundation said in a statement.

“We suspect that the use of excessive force with the use of tear gas and unprocedural crowd control have caused the massive death toll.”

Amnesty International Indonesia has called for accountability, saying the “loss of life cannot go unanswered.”

“People must be warned that tear gas will be used and allowed to disperse,” the group’s executive director Usman Hamid said. “Tear gas should only be used to disperse crowds when widespread violence has occurred and when other methods have failed.”


Sweden allows exports of war material to Turkey

Sweden allows exports of war material to Turkey
Updated 02 October 2022

Sweden allows exports of war material to Turkey

Sweden allows exports of war material to Turkey
  • Four rockets landed in the Green Zone on Wednesday during a partial lockdown as parliament was convening, wounding seven security personnel, and another four rockets fired from eastern Baghdad landed around the zone on Thursday

STOCKHOLM: Sweden has reauthorized exports of war materials to Turkey in an apparently significant concession to Ankara, which is threatening to block the Nordic country’s NATO membership.

Ankara requested the lifting of the restrictions — which were introduced in 2019 following a Turkish offensive in northeastern Syria — after Sweden applied to join NATO in mid-May.

“The government has made the assessment that a Swedish membership in NATO is the best way to protect Sweden’s and the Swedish people’s security,” the Inspectorate of Strategic Products said in a statement.

The government had already announced in June that Swedish membership of the military alliance could affect policy around military exports.

“Sweden’s application for NATO membership to a large degree strengthens the defense and security policy arguments for approving exports of war materials to other member states, including Turkey,” the authority said.

The ISP said it had approved exports relating to “electronic equipment,” “software” and “technical assistance” to Turkey in the third quarter of 2022.

To date, 28 of the 30 NATO member states have ratified the accession of Sweden and Finland. Only Hungary and Turkey remain. New members to the alliance require unanimous approval.

Turkey’s parliament is due to resume work on Saturday after the summer break. But the country is heading for parliamentary elections in June 2023 and this could make it cautious about voting on membership for the Nordic countries.

As of Friday, Ankara had not reacted to the Swedish announcement.